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Cukurbagli

Eşyam

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It is May, 2003. I had decided to come and live in Turkey. My wife had bought a little village house (in the days when you could) and I had bought a large piece of land on which to build my dream home.For ages it seemed, I had trawled the Ex-Pat forums looking for advice from other people and finally got Pickfords International to come and size up my stuff to give me a quote.

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You know somethng Cukurbagli,That didnt surprise me one bit!. When i was serving with the forces all over the world we used to use pickfords for what we called a Unit move - that was the whole regiment - 600+ guys plus equipment, wives, kids and all their household belongings. Needless to say quite a large amount of kit used to go missing. One move in particular was to a place called Hohne in germany - i remember the police reports after the move. Over 250 mountain bikes went missing over the space of three days.There was not too much they could do about the packing as we all used 1.3m3 wooden packing cases and submitted our own lists in triplicate.When we came here i used a firm from turkey but they used a UK firm for pick up. I had a 20 foot container for our stuff, and had already packed everything in said boxes and large cardboard ones and crated the white goods.Upon arrival the driver dropped the container at the end of the drive and said right thats 3 hours mate any longer and its 100 quid an hour extra!!!.Well after doing a few moves in my time i wasnt fazed one bit and after exactly 1hr 47 mins i knocked on his cab and told him to seal it! He couldnt beleive it and was flabbergasted when i showed him the container with no space left on it!!He was well upset he couldnt scam any more money out of us, so after i gave him 2 copies of the packing lists - all 60 odd pages etc he left.I came turkey to get my residency to import it and had to call in at Mugla on the way to Izmir to pick it up. When i got there i was informed by the turkish lot i had been charged another 300 quid for not producing my packing lists to the driver!!! MMM nice try you to^^^er!! I got on the phone and refused point blank to pay it, i had also sent copies via email to the uk rep and the turkish ones so they did not have a leg to stand on.Even so it cost me about 5k in all including the customs bribes but the kit all arrived excepting one box which vanished.Scream

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What a terrible experience!! Moving to another place has always been a nightmare for me, since my first frustration, when the porters at the train station tried to cheat me. Now I keep my 'eşya' as small as possible as I dont want to add another one to the list of horror stories of moving. Now what do you think to do? There must be way of proving that your tools are not more than an amateur would need..By clock, you mean mechanical clocks, dont you?

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No-one else will ever do anything the way you yourself want or plan it ! My husband did all our packing, into wooden crates he had made himself. There were a LOT of tools and equipment, and these were packed in between books and all sorts of stuff. We needed a 40ft container to bring it to Turkey. The ship was 4 weeks late, and we engaged a local agent in Izmir to get us through Customs. It didn't go altogether smoothly, but in the end we had to pay an extra 500 euros in bribes. Altogether the total cost of shipping from Melbourne in 2003 was the equivalent of 14,000 lira (including bribes).

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By clock, you mean mechanical clocks, dont you?

Yes Saffron, I used to repair and restore antique clocks from the period 1680 to 1750, all mechanical in those days.

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Interesting thread indeed:) This is another source of horror stories. One British friend in Istanbul took months to get her furniture released from Customs and it cost her a pretty penny. I lived in Germany before going to Turkey and didn't have any of this non-EU sh*t there. For that reason everything I can't stuff into a suitcase if I ever leave Turkey will have to stay there. I have an apartment in the UK and TR and use both so don't need to do any shipping, but were that situation to change in the future, would simply sell or dump the stuff.

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.......... I must admit reading through your horror stories I'm having second thoughts on shipping the few bits of furniture I have over........ as said I'm storing for 6m to give us a chance to settle and find somewhere more permanent to rent, (it's also a back up if we/I decide to come back and start up again, you never know)....but for what I actually have in furniture I may end up selling when the time comes if we decide were staying......... I can always have a few personal belongings sent over by courier or something......

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You know somethng Cukurbagli,That didnt surprise me one bit!.

You mentioned in a different thread about having had a service career. So did I (R.A.F. 23 years), so I knew you would know all about that sort of thing. Well done with packing your stuff and screwing the driver out of a fiddle. The Air Force used to use a different firm but can't remember their name now.

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C'mon people,

Don't scare everyone off.

I had lots of tools (mechanical repairs) and strangely enough, I was told that I had enough to open a workshop.

(Actually looking at the shops here, I can furnish 3, not 1)

But they couldn't find any valid rule to stop my agent to bring them in.

I think the secret was letting the packagers themselves do their job, marking the boxes and make their list.

Anything the customs officer wanted to see was easy to produce, didn't have to spend a penny as a bribe.

As I mentioned before only trouble I had was the "non required document" advice I received but they certainly wanted it.

I would do it again without hesitation.

And I would keep more stuff this time, not selling them for pittance.

I am still looking for bits that I used to have.

Just don't stop asking questions..

:):drunk[1]:

Regards,

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'I used to repair and restore antique clocks from the period 1680 to 1750, all mechanical in those days. 'sounds great..if I had a chance, mechanical clocks would definitely be my hobby..I also love the toys that are called 'clockwork'..once I had a small collection of clockworks..So, I think you will work on them again, after you hopefully bring your tools..

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Well we all know people who've had different experiences Yoz. You were lucky, I wasn't.Yes saffron, I'll get them eventually. Need to build a workshop first.

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We used Pickfords to take our stuff from Hungary to Ankara. They tried to gazump us on the price by telling us when they had loaded the lorry that the volume would cost 200 pounds more than the price they quoted before loading. So we told them to unload 200 pounds worth of junk that we'd acquired and left it behind.The rest of the move went quite smoothly. My wife got the stuff out of customs in Ankara quite easily, although they demanded 20 Euros tax for the TV (paid with receipt) and for a radio cassette player (abandoned).We should have done it ourselves by putting it in a container on a Turkish lorry (of which there were many) at the customs area in Szeged. It would have been much cheaper (although most of the bill was paid by employer). We just thought it would be better to go for reputation (!) and the convenience sounded attractive. Win some, lose some.

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