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screamlead

Plants Out Here

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Open question to anyone in the know?Anybody know if the following are available over here - Blueberry plants/bushes - i have seeds but they dont seem to grow past sproutingRhubarb - same again i have seeds but they seem to sprout then collapseBlackberry plants - i haveone from a garden centre in fethiye but its not doing much and one died on me last yearGooseberry bushes - i have one and hoping my cuttings have rooted and come up this yeari brought over a blackberry and blueberry last year but both wilted and died on me i think the soil was not acidic enough for them.Also on the hunt for a lime tree/seeds/or plant - i got what is supposed to be a lime from said garden centre its leaves are a different colour to normal lemon etc being sort of two toned light green in colour.My garden soil is pretty bad and has some clay in it deeper down so once the garden is redone i will be making raised beds the whole way round the garden and filling with the local animals by-products and black soil.ThanksScream

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I've tried black and red currants as well as gooseberry to no avail, as you say, they grew a bit but then died off even though I put them in the shadiest part of the garden. A friend had some success with currants but only at her place at a higher altitude.

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HelloIt is worth doing a soil test to establish what nutrients and minerals are missing from your soil before trying plants that are not indigenous. And if you want to grow acid loving shrubs then it would be wise to plant in large tubs filled with ericaceous soil. Lack of iron usually shows as etiolation and poor growth rather than sudden collapse so there may be something else which your shrubs don't like - when you test the soil check for contaminants at the same time. There could of course be pathogens in the soil - fungi and the like - which are attacking your plants as well.Basically the heart of this is good husbandry - check your soil, improve it and plant what is most likely to thrive in it rather than trying to fight against your environment.Of course extreme heat and dryness don't help, but you alleviate the dryness by installing water in one way or another to humidify the immediate area. Make sure it is not still though as that will provide a breeding ground for insects that you really don't want to encourage!!Lots of luck,Your local(ish) RHS horticulturalist....

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Hi Saina,LOL thanks for the reply - i understood some of it - ha ha. I have a soil tester thing i got from b&q Uk and have tested my soil in different places all round the garden. Its one of those that goes different colours? and as far as i can tell its showing normal soil buti have no idea as to what nutrients would be missing?I have dug it over a few times and down about 18inches or so there tends to be a bit of clay - obviously why the garden floods in bad weather?. I have quite a few large trees on one side too which tends to dry out the surrounding area no matter how much i watered it.The fruit bushes i brought over were planted in pots in normal soil until i found out i needed acid based but they had collapsed by then. I'm trying to get the next visitors to bring some more for me.My gooseberry seems ok and is in a pot to which i am going to repot shortly into a larger one - i planted some of the branches/stems into anothr pot next to it last autumn and they seem to have rooted ok so hopefully i will get some extra ones this year. No fruit yet as its only about 1 year old but fingers crossed this year.I would like to get hold of some rhubarb tubers if poss as my seeds dont do very well fro some reason? any ideas??Most of the other stuff i plant seems to do ok and all my other fruit bushes/trees are well established anyway.Scream

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Morning ScreamRhubarb is very easy to grow if it has a few basics. But it is an incredibly hungry plant and needs huge amounts of everything including water if it to succeed. Perhaps you could buy some tubers from specialist vegetable and fruit growers - they are lots on the web and generally the stock they supply is excellent. Plant rhubarb in as shady a spot as you can find, in an area where the soil is rich and stays moist. Before planting dig a hole 3 times the size you need for the tubers, going down to the clay pan, break the pan up, add a layer of grit, then add enough enriched compost to half fill the hole. Water copiously, and check that the hole drains well (the water should run through to the clay pan and not stay in the bottom of your hole). Now mix in some shredded newspaper and well -rotted manure, mix through again and then plant in the evening (so that the tubers have a chance to adjust to their new home before any heat upsets them too much).If this doesn't work go to the supermarket and buy rhubarb when it is available (not much in Turkey I'm afraid)!!!!!!!!!!Seriously though your testing kit from B+Q will only give you very basic information. It might be worth popping along to a good plant centre and asking them for help in analysing your soil - if the soil has been contaminated by heavy leads and stuff you should not eat anything from it anyway, and it is surprising how often seemingly pure areas are touched by run off from farms or industrial works that seem too far away to reach your lovely plot... If there are pathogens present in the soil you can treat to sterilise an area if you want to, though this is not a simple process as you can imagine.Here in the UK we are very lucky with our temperate climate and generally good fertile soil, we get used to plants coping in adverse conditions without having to d much other than plant, water, feed and natter to them, but in a climate that can be relatively extreme, with much poorer soil conditions you need to be aware of any plants natural habitat and try to recreate it wherever possible if you want to have any success. Rhubarb is a forest plant that like to grow near streams, in deep leaf-littered soil.....any chance you can make that for it????Ah well - let me know how you get on and in the meantime I'll think a bit about alternatives that you could consider growing if all else fails - though that is tough as there really is nothing like fresh rhubarb, taken from the garden and cooked within a few hours.......

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Wow some good info there thanks, Funnily enough i actually have a stream that runs the whole length of my garden down one side and its pretty shady too. I have peach, pomegranete, and fig all growing down that side as well as a couple of grape vines too white and black.i only have the seeds to go with at the moment so ill have another go this year and see what i can do with those.Most of the other stuff i have planted has done ok in the past ie tomatoes, lettuce, radish and onions.i even got some ginger to start growing in a pot after chopping it into smaller pieces but the dogs barged past the pot and damaged them = grrr!Lots of leaf mulch to dig back in every year too and i have a decent compost heap coming along now after 3 years of weeding and garden clearing.CheersScream

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Hi Screamlead, in Turkey bilberry grows in cold and rainy forests of the eastern parts of the Black Sea region. The species is called 'Vaccinium myrtillus', which is called 'blueberry' in some references. I dont know if the hot climate of Fethiye is good for the plant, but if it has a chance to grow here, it will surely need good drainage in soil. Its roots are very sensitive to changes in humidity, according to Dr.H.

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Ahhhhhh! Bilberry now theres a memory! - i used to know a litle sopt in Uk where i came from that we used to go and pick them in summer. I didnt know you could get them here but now i know i shall have to hunt some plants down - nothing better than a hot bilberry pie with cream - mmmmm!Funnily enough i did ask at a local garden centre in fethiye opposite migros but all i got from there was a couple of blackberry plants of which one snuffed it. I am hoping the other one may start sprouting shortly. Once i do start on the garden i will be making enclosed raised beds so making one of them suitable for the acidic loving stuff should not be a problem.

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Hi AllBilberry sounds like a great idea, and rhubarb may adapt near the stream. Good luck with all of that and I am sure you will be reaping and harvesting by next year!!! Rhubarb crumble, rhubarb pie, rhubarb compote, rhubarb jam - mmmmmmmmmmmm!!Just one other thing though, Saffron you are right that peat can be used as a soil conditioner, but....the world's peat resources are under pressure as more and more of this precious material is removed and used for fuel and soil conditioning. So everyone, PLEASE DON'T use peat to condition your garden soil. There are plenty of materials for this, which come from renewable and sustainable sources (manure, leaf litter, garden compost etc etc) that are excellent, safe, organic and most importantly not peat.Enjoy the coming gardening season all....Oh and feel free to ask me questions about horticulture, gardening, sustainable resources - it's what I do!!

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I think moderation is important here..Using it for fuel- like in Ireland-or removing peatlands for agriculture-like Indonesia are not 'moderate' actions. I think its ok to use it when you want to grow a tree and your piece of land is too degraded for that purpose.

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I am trying again to upload a picture. This time of a five-petal, blue wild flower I saw at Hierapolis. Couldn't find it on the web. Does anyone know what it is. The four petal, yellow flower with it looks like wild radish.Oh, darn. I can't make this upload work. It spins around acting like it's going to work then an attachment icon appears but there is nothing there. I'm sending it anyway in hopes that you gardeners may know this wild flower. It's like a bluet but deeper blue and one more petal.

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Can it be Anemone coronaria? It is called 'dağ lalesi ' here..Around Fethiye it is common, and Baba Mountain is the gen center ..It has petals of varying colors, including blue. If you write this name on your search engine, you will find good pictures..

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Thanks, Saffron, but that's not it. Although I didn't know that the poppy was also an anemone. My flower is much smaller and only five petals. I'll try to upload it again from a different location. Maybe tonight.

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The red ones of Anemone coronaria-dağ lalesi 'mountain tulip'- really look like poppy, but they are not..Talking about poppy, let me write its Turkish name: Gelincik. What a lovely name: Gelincik means small bride, as the Turkish brides were putting red cloths in traditional times..A tiny, beautiful, bride-like flower!

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Hi Saffron, that is sweet. I think I'll have to redo my blog with this new information. I can't upload photos to the forum for some reason but you can go to this link and see the flowers on my blog. I will appreciate your identifying the wild flowers, as I am striving to be accurate. There are only four pictures so far but I am hoping to add to this page, as I come upon more wild flowers in the next three months. Thanks for any suggestions. Cheers, Alice.

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Thanks so much, Saffron. You must be a botanist!! I already have two more to ask you about. I found them on a walk through my neighborhood. I will be posting them on the same blog page soon.PS I can email pictures sooner if you want.

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Your blog looks lovely with wild flowers! I can visit your blog or you can send me a mail, let me see if I will know them..Names of some plants vary greatly from region to region, but there are almost standard names as well . .In some cases there are hundreds of species of the same genus, which can be large in number, too..

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The flowers on the left look like Gazania sp, they love to escape from gardens!! I love them, they dont demand much, and give big bright flowers..On the right, I think I've seen them but dont know their names..

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Hi guysI am not a gardener but I put 30 fruit trees in my garden they are all growing and producing fruitted

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Ted you must have a factory to process.:) I have a sniff of those lovely jar of jams and marmelade coming from your cellars..all organic....how lovely..I'll tell you what when the season comes a can set a corner stall and earn money for you :):D

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