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jackieeuk

Seksenusagi

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My Partner was born and raised in a small village called Seksenusagi. And although I have spent hours trawling the internet for photos for this village there appears to be none available.

The closest town will be Ortaköy which is just a few miles away in the Cappadocia region of Turkey.

Please if anyone has visited this area or as any photos they would be willing to share with me so I can actually see the place of his birth.

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The nearest pictures I've found are of Askaray on the net. Maybe Seksenusagi is too small to warrant photos or no-one has visited in a tourist capacity.

As to what to do when you visit his family. i wouldn't worry too much as you will be the "honoured guest" and therefore not required to do the chores, but you could ask out of respect.

My English friend is married to a Turk, from a nearby village, to Dalaman, and when we've visited she's done nothing at all.

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You are right about the village. It literally is a village that no one would want to actually visit, but I'm hoping just maybe someone on a back packing holiday might have just stumbled across it.

Thanks also about the visiting the family. I want to make a good impression. Perhaps I shouldn't, otherwise I will be considered marriage material!

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There are so many places out in Central/Eastern Turkey that aren't really on the map and, and it would be very unusual to find photos of those towns. Out that way a guest's happiness is considered to be the responsibility of the host, they may drive you crazy with all of their efforts to feed you, entertain you, make you feel welcome and generally take care of you.

I think I can give you some assurance that you'll enjoy the visit. I was the guest of a family in Adana and I could hardly leave the house to get a pack of smokes because they were afraid that they hadn't taken care of me well enough. They just felt like if I had to leave the house for something, then they had failed in some way to have it on hand for me! But then again I've also stayed at Turks houses who were more relaxed about the hospitality thing, but it was still well above what I was ever used to in any country. You're in for a treat I think.

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Thank you Ken for that reassurance. I am really looking forward to the visit, yet apprehensive although it won't be this year, due to my not having enough leave left, and now that Penny and yourself has reassured me I feel a bit relaxed. My partner was, as I said, born and raised in this isolated area, where traditions are still strong and the fear of my western ways thrust upon them may make me appear disrespectful.

I am not a larger lout and am quiet. I needed reassurance from people who know more about their culture than I do. I know that asking about photos for the village was a long shot, But I'm just hoping a back packer somewhere who likes to get away from Joe's Fish & Chip shops and the British bull dog pubs and get stuck into the heart of a country might just have stumbled across this village.

I won't hold my breath though.

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I've researched a few backpacker sites for Turkey and the nearest pictures are of Aksaray. Sorry not found any closer.

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I have spent hours and have come to the conclusion there are none. I think I'm going to have to send him a camera (he's currently back with his family).

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Another way of looking, if you haven't already, is Google earth. Put in Seksenusagi Turkey and zoom in. It should show you a satellite image of area. Has your partner told you about Turkish toilets?

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That's all I could find about the village, the satellite image, sending flowers to the village, and hotels, that's close enough to the area in order to get to the village. And no, he hasn't told me about the toilets but the others have. I absolutely know I'll end up down there with what I've just departed with.

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He probably didn't tell you because to him they're completely normal! But if you travel around the rural areas, take your own toilet paper. There may be none unless you go to a nice restaurant. Interestingly enough I asked a pub owner about his having a western-style sit-down toilet, and he said he's actually gotten complaints from Turks who consider it unsanitary to sit on a surface where someone else has done their "business." So I guess it's all how you look at it. I have, however been in homes in some of the rural areas and they have both kinds, side-by-side.

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When I bought my place it had a Turkish toilet, being a Turkish style build, which I had changed straight away!

My friend's family house in a village nearby has an outside turkish toilet, set 20 feet away from the house, that has three walls, a rickety door and no roof. You can see over the top when standing up! It has no flush, just a water barrel and jug to clean yourself afterwards and to pour down the toilet, and smells! Not for the faint hearted, but when you gotta go, you gotta go! They have no shower room either, just an old fashioned washing at the sink.

But as Ken said, it's quite normal for the locals. I was told that my friend's mother-in -law, if visiting a western house with proper toilet, wouldn't know how to use it, and have to physically be shown.

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Oh Penny you made me roar with laughter when I read your post, I was imagining you sitting down doing what you have to do gazing up looking at the stars.

Ken, one thing I have noticed is just how clean they are. Everyone and myself I have to admit before I saw for myself imagined things not to be as I am used to but when I first went to my partner's place of abode I was very surprised at just how clean and tidy thing were. It was so clean and tidy, so I can see how they think sitting where someone else just has is considered unclean. I have dogs and he was horrified totally shocked on how I could possibly keep animals in the house.

Usually the shoes come off when entering a house, but he said he couldn't walk in bare feet where animals have been, and yet upstairs the shoes had to come off including mine. It's my house yet he couldn't bear to walk into the bedroom in shoes where he had just worn them where animals had been.

I am very quick to put people right who think they are not as sanitary as us. I found myself doing housework all the time trying to bring myself up to his standards.

Going to the loo, hmm. I think pampers might be on my list of things to take when i go! My friend visited her husband's family. She is a large lady and she said she found it very difficult to use their toilets. She just couldn't balance. I didn't mean to, but I laughed trying to imagine her squatting and losing her balance. Her husband said he couldn't stop laughing either. I'm off to the the gym to become more flexible!

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I can assure you Jackie, you can't sit down on a turkish toilet, squat more like! If you've been to Europe you will still see some. Here they are like a shower tray, with 2 raised areas either side of the hole to put your feet on. Ideal for men, if they just need a wee, but more difficult for us, especially wearing trousers. You either have to take them off completely or try to keep them off the tray, whilst balancing. Not an easy feat I assure you.

The other thing, you can't put any paper down the loos, the waste pipes are narrow so clog up easily. A small bin is provided for any waste paper! A thing I used to forget on returning to UK, I'd throw the paper on the floor where a bin would be, you get so used to it.

Another thing, you'll vary rarely find a sink plug except in major hotels. They believe it is unclean to wash in anything but running water. Back in UK, we'd fill a sink with hot water, wash in it, then rinse in the same water.

The Turks don't see domestic animals as we do, although some do pamper their pets. The dogs live outside usually guarding the property, cats are there to keep rodents down and half feral. Except a local cat who walks in my house each morning when I open the door and sits by the fridge waiting for a saucer of milk, then promptly finds a comfy spot to sleep. I have to physically evict him when I need to go out. The other cats come around to me but are not tame as yet!

The main reason you take your shoes off when entering a Turkish house, is to keep the dirt and dust out. Some houses will issue you a pair of house slippers to wear, and if you need their toilet, often you take off the slippers and put on a pair of plastic flip flops. If you came to my house, you'd leave your shoes by the door and you'd wear my slippers. I walk around bare footed anyway including my balcony! I spend a lot of time washing my feet.

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Well I said. I wanted to visit Turkey but never did I think that less than a week later I would be going! I was going to keep it quiet until I got back and then just proudly present my photos in an album but I cant keep my mouth shut, I just have to tell you. I'm going to be the first to publish photos of Seksenusagi on the net.

I'm leaving in the early hours Monday and coming back next Sunday.The trip was nothing to do with me, all arranged behind my back. My partner 's boss asked me to go and see him and it was urgent. I went down and I was presented with flight details, all paid for, so I could go and visit my partner. I only mentioned that I had been signed off from work for two weeks for various things, and that was it. I was given a ticket and told to go and enjoy the country. I just had to tell you all.

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That's wonderful news Jackie, you must be really excited to be going over there quicker than you hoped. We will want to see loads of photos when you get back, not forgetting posts on what you did and saw.

Do what I used to do. Write down place names and notes to jog your memory for when you get back, as I'm sure you'll be overwhelmed by the experiences you'll encounter. Really, have a great time, and enjoy!

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