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Giray

Moving to turkey soon

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Hi 

I have been following this forum for long time  but this is my first time to post on it . I'm going to retire soon as I'm getting near the age of 63 . My missus and I  had visited several cities in Turkey and we fall in love in all of them. Now we  decided to spent more time in turkey  precisely  from early May to late October  every year and we need  advice from you wise people to choose which area we can settle in.We are looking for a quiet non touristy  village  preferably overlooking the sea  near an airport and has a suitable weather for outdoor activities during that period of the year.TIA

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Welcome to the Forum Giray. in order to help make decent suggestions we probably need to know what you mean by non touristy.  We fled Bodrum when it became unbearable for us, especially in the summer. If you really go non touristy then you will need to speak more Turkish, you will not have access to 'expat' bars and restaurants. Non of that is a problem for us.  You will also need to buy a car if you are to live in a village. For us it also means having to drive 25km to the nearest town, 50km to the nearest city. When you say airport do you mean international airport or are you happy to fly via Istanbul for example?

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Thanks Abi for your reply. You may agree that touristic cities are  usually crowded, noisy during the season and we are trying to avoid that. Living in a village or small town  nearby local airport  about 30 k.m.distance hopefully will give us  easy reach  to  both city amenities and the airport  whenever we like. We are used to have dinner at home most of  the evenings and we are not fancy about bars as well so there will be no problem with that. The only issue will be the language barrier as you mentioned  but we will  trying to get over by using instant translation applications on the phone and  we will work hard  to learn some Turkish . Later after settling  we will buy  our own car if we feel we need to.

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In our village there is a bus into town each day at 08:00 but you would have to fill your time in town as the only return bus leaves at 15:00

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Thanks  Abi I'm sure it's a nice  village but it seems to be  in  a very  remote location  than we are planning to be . We liked  Uzumlu  near  Fethiye  still we are searching  for something  a bit more Turkish 

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I've been looking for something similar as well. I live in Antalya now but will be moving next year. I am thinking of one of the towns near Fethiye or Marmaris. My plan is to rent a car (or drive my own if I buy one before then) and visit various towns there and stay for a day or two in each one. I personally wouldn't want to live in Marmaris, but the area not only has nice beaches but also a lot of greenery and trees, so that's why I am taking a look at that area.

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I am not trying to recommend our village at all, just to point out the things that need considering before moving. Believe me, we are happy to be the only foreigners in town! At first people thought we were strange but over the years many of the things that we have chosen, bought or done have been copied by the locals. We were the first people in the village to use drip irrigation, to buy a strimmer for example, before that people had used scythes, some still do.

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Giray, take a look at Ovacik or Gocek. Just north of Fethiye. If you want restaurants or bars, you can drive in to town or take the bus during the summer months. However, it will be quiet and English is spoken widely in this part of Turkey, so the barrier will not be a major issue. You could also go a little further north and look on the outskirts of Bodrum, but prices will be much higher in that region. 

Are you planning to buy or rent? That can help me point you in the right direction. 

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Thanks Justin .  We visited both areas and we liked  Ovacik because it is a bit  cooler  during  summer and located short distance from Fethiye and Oludeniz .but still  a lot of holiday maker flood the area during the summer  . We are planning to rent first and see how it goes

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The last place I will recommend is a bit further north, but a place we enjoy visiting. Cunda Island in Ayvalik is gorgeous. Lots of history and some of the best olives and olive oil you will come across in Turkey. Look up Ayvalik olive oil. :) The city and surrounding area is small and unique-very Turkish. Even if you don't decide to live, it's worth a visit when you are in. All the best! 

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I've visited Köyceğiz before, it is a lovely and quiet town. As I recall there were plenty of shade trees, which I liked a lot. Plus the promenade along the lake. I understand it isn't a touristy place like nearby Dalyan.

I love Ayvalık. And the nearby Sarımsaklı Beach. It is very charming and there were few tourists.  I was also considering moving there. I told a Turk about this, and he said the water is much colder there. A friend of his had gone there, supposedly even during the tourism season, and found the water too cold to swim in. Of course this is third-hand information, and I never went and stuck my foot in the water, but it's something to check on if you like to swim.

Another town I love, north of Izmir, is Foça. It might be too small for a lot of people, but wow, it is a very pretty town.

Ayvalık and Foça are also on the İzban route. The İzban is Izmir's metro. I don't know how long it takes to get from Izmir to Foça or Ayvalık, but it might be nice to take the train into the center of Izmir whenever you want.

Besides the towns around Marmaris, I was also considering some of the towns on the peninsula near Izmir, such as Seferihisar. Seferihisar is a designated citaslow, or "slow city," where the pace of life is intentionally relaxed. Plus it's not far from Izmir. I used to live in Çeşme and I liked it a lot, but I've heard from the locals it gets incredibly crowded with tourists in the summer these days.

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Have a swim before you decide. We stayed in a place called Ören, somewhere near Ayvalik (not the one near Bodrum), in fact we were there when Iraq invaded Kuwait, and the water is freezing.  ( We had left Kuwait 1 month earlier so it was a bit of a shock). I seem to remember it was also freezing in Teos outside Izmir.

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On 07/07/2019 at 16:19, Ken Grubb said:

I've been looking for something similar as well. I live in Antalya now but will be moving next year. I am thinking of one of the towns near Fethiye or Marmaris. My plan is to rent a car (or drive my own if I buy one before then) and visit various towns there and stay for a day or two in each one. I personally wouldn't want to live in Marmaris, but the area not only has nice beaches but also a lot of greenery and trees, so that's why I am taking a look at that area.

Hi Ken,

Thank you for your time and sharing so much useful information on this forum. I have been researching about Turkey and living there for a while now and I have been trying to find information on Americans living there. You seem to have great experience and knowledge regarding this subject. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to find anything in regards to sharing financial and tax information between Turkey and The United States governments!

- In your experience, does Turkey share financial and banking information with the IRS or the treasury?

- Is it beneficial to request residency in Turkey if we are only going to stay there off&on for Six months a year at the most (for tax purposes)?

- What do you think about purchasing a property in Alanya, we visited there recently and really like the small tourist town atmosphere?

- Do Americans with Turkish residency, have to file taxes with the IRS and the Turkish tax office?

Thank you in advance for your time and I am looking forward to hear from you soon.

 

Regards,

Mav

 

 

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Mav,

I have been living here for a little over a year, and there has not been any sharing of bank/financial information between Turkey and the US. If you are living here in Turkey, unless you have an earned income, you will be fine. Earned is the key term. Not retirements, 401k, SS, etc. That was the interpretation given to me, and I have had no issues. Now, would I call up the IRS and say here is the scoop? Doubtful, but I have yet to and don't forsee any issue in my future. 

You won't be able to work unless you have citizenship or a special work permit (Which is hard to obtain), so if you are only going to be here for 6 months out of the year, you will be fine. 

I am a property advisor here in Turkey, but I am not trying to sell you or endorse my business, but here is a link to why we have seen a rise in property investment in Alanya.

https://www.propertyturkey.com/blog-turkey/why-alanya-is-popular-with-foreign-house-buyers

Alanya offers a multitude of options for home buyers. Most importantly, it is one of the more affordable areas in the region to buy outright. If you have any questions, please feel free to start a thread and I'll do my best to answer whatever you've got. Ken has great experience to share as do many others. 

Hope this helped a bit!

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Mav,

Straight from the US Embassy in Ankara website. https://tr.usembassy.gov/u-s-citizen-services/local-resources-of-u-s-citizens/living-in-turkey/

If you are planning to stay in Turkey for more than 90 days within a 180-day period, for any reason, including tourism, you must get a Turkish residence permit.  In order to obtain a residence permit, please schedule an online appointment at Directorate General of Migration Management’s website before you contact Provincial Directorates of Migration Management Office in your area.

You can obtain sworn affidavit notarials for original U.S. birth certificates for the purpose of getting residence permits by scheduling a notarial appointment.  There is no need for the minor to appear, one parent with the original copy of the US Birth Certificate with the parent’s ID will suffice for a sworn affidavit .

The U.S. Embassy strongly urges U.S Citizens not to overstay their visas and to maintain valid residence permits at all times.  Turkish authorities do enforce the laws, including those stipulating fines, deportation, and bans on future travel to Turkey for people who overstay their visas or do not maintain valid residency permits. If you stay beyond the date your visa or residence permit expires, even if only for a few days, you will be fined at the port of exit and will be subject to a travel ban preventing you from re-entering Turkey for a period between three months and five years (depending on the length of your overstay).  Monthly fines for overstaying Turkish visas or residency permits add up quickly. Travelers are encouraged to check with local authorities to ensure compliance with all Turkish immigration regulations.

U.S. citizens who have overstayed their visas, residence permits, or visa exempt periods and are subject to a fine can also benefit from the residence permit procedure as long as they pay the related fines.

If you are a tourist and want to stay longer in Turkey

U.S. citizens who enter Turkey with a tourist visa obtained at a Turkish Embassy or Consulate or who buy a tourist visa stamp at an airport or other port of entry or who are exempt from getting tourist visas, and who wish to stay in Turkey for tourism purposes longer than 90 days, are able to get a tourist residence permit for a maximum period of six months by scheduling an online appointment for e-residency applications at e-ikamet.goc.gov.tr for Provincial Directorates of Migration Management Offices.  The six month residence permit plus the 90-day initial entry permit will allow U.S. citizens to stay legally in Turkey for up to a total of 9 months.

 

Obtaining U.S. criminal records for residence permits

Information on how to obtain U.S. criminal records can be found here.

Do I need health insurance to get a residence permit in Turkey?

If you are obtaining residence permit, you will be required by the Turkish government to get health insurance that has coverage in Turkey.

The Turkish government implemented a general health insurance law called the Social Insurance and General Health Insurance Law (GHI). You can find below some useful information and updates about the General Health Insurance Law (GHI) if you are applying for GHI in Turkey.

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Thank you Justin for taking the time and I really appreciate the links for the important information. We have yet to decide, but we doubt staying anywhere for more than 90 days. However the information you have provided is much appreciated, since we can strategize for the future. 

Thank you kindly,

Mav

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Quote

- In your experience, does Turkey share financial and banking information with the IRS or the treasury?

Yes. The USA and Turkey have an international agreement to share tax information. It also covers what is taxed and not taxed in Turkey. You can read it here:

https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-trty/turkey.pdf

Quote

- Is it beneficial to request residency in Turkey if we are only going to stay there off&on for Six months a year at the most (for tax purposes)?

Yes. If you are going to stay more than 90 days in any 180-day period, you will need to get a residence permit to cover the rest of the time. You can get one for months, a year, or two years. You will need to apply using their online system within 60 days of your reaching your visa's expiration date, or the maximum amount of time the visa allows (in your case, you would apply after 30 days).

Quote

- What do you think about purchasing a property in Alanya, we visited there recently and really like the small tourist town atmosphere?

If you don't mind the touristy feel of it, I think Alanya would be a nice place to live. Great beaches, and a pretty town in my opinion. Lots of expats from all over Europe live there, it has a diverse expat community.

Quote

- Do Americans with Turkish residency, have to file taxes with the IRS and the Turkish tax office?

Read the tax treaty to be sure, since that overrides everything. The basic law says, by default, if your main home, your "base" is in Turkey, or you are making income from providing personal services for more than 183 days in a year, while in Turkey, then you are a tax resident of Turkey for that year, and you have to pay taxes on your worldwide income, in Turkey.

However,

The tax treaty between the USA and Turkey overrides this, making some things taxable only in the home country. For example, rental income from a property in the person's home country (USA or Turkey) is taxable only in the home country, not in the country where the person has tax residence. So if you have a rental property in the USA, you pay the taxes for that in the USA, no matter how much time you spend in Turkey.

If you are receiving income from an annuity or pension, it works the same way under the treaty. Taxes on that are paid in the home country from where the annuity of pension originates.

If for some reason you have to pay taxes in Turkey, you can first ask the Internal Revenue Service to stop automatically deducting taxes from your income. Then, when you pay taxes in Turkey, you can get a tax credit on your US tax return for the taxes you had to pay in Turkey.

Read the tax treaty as linked above for more detailed information.

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Just like Ibrahim Ali we live in a village location. Not far from Bozcaada island our house overlooks the sea with a main town 22 km away and Canakkale around 70 km away. It means that we can get a flight to either Ankara or Istanbul fairly easily if we want to travel overseas but we have settled her permanently so we don't have to worry about visas or residency permits etc. 

One thing that Ibrahim Ali has already pointed out and something which is very important. You really do need to speak Turkish if you want to live in a Turkish village. Our village is a bit remote and if we have Turkish friends from Canakkale come to visit us for the first time they are a bit surprised to find that when they park up in the village square all eyes are on them and they are watched with interest until I turn up to meet them. The one big upside about living in a village is that you are much more readily accepted as one of the locals if you live there, adopt a local name, speak the language and integrate with the community. This level of acceptance is unlikely to take place in a big town or city in the same way as it does in a small community. 

Although the village we live in might seem a little remote we are near the very touristic island of Bozcaada but we also have our own wonderful sandy beach at the bottom of the hill which gets local tourists from Istanbul and we live in an unspoiled area of Turkey in a region which is much cheaper than the tourist resorts. 

This has already been mentioned but you will need a car if you live in a Turkish village. We bought a new car when we first arrived but we hardly use it now. We have acquired one of those BMC ( Leyland Sherpa van - A la Turkish style ) flatbed pickups ( Kamyonet ) for around £2000 ( 2200 Euro or $2500 ) and then spent another TL2000 bringing up to tip top condition ( New tyres all round, new radiator, service, cv joint, track rod ends, etc etc - basically changed anything that was not in good condition ). Parts and insurance are cheap for these vehicles since they are made in Turkey and we bomb around everywhere in it. They are robust and ideal for village life which is why almost every village in Turkey has them.

Anyway, some great advice from Ken, JustinM and Ibrahim Ali  - Take a look at Ayvacik and Cunda Island as mentioned - You might find that is more to your liking albeit as Ibrahim has mentioned the water is colder than the south coast.

 

20180710_184338.jpg.a0c3d3b024958300e2b8cad650308aba.jpg

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On 16/07/2019 at 15:39, as012a2568 said:

Just like Ibrahim Ali we live in a village location. Not far from Bozcaada island our house overlooks the sea with a main town 22 km away and Canakkale around 70 km away. It means that we can get a flight to either Ankara or Istanbul fairly easily if we want to travel overseas but we have settled her permanently so we don't have to worry about visas or residency permits etc. 

One thing that Ibrahim Ali has already pointed out and something which is very important. You really do need to speak Turkish if you want to live in a Turkish village. Our village is a bit remote and if we have Turkish friends from Canakkale come to visit us for the first time they are a bit surprised to find that when they park up in the village square all eyes are on them and they are watched with interest until I turn up to meet them. The one big upside about living in a village is that you are much more readily accepted as one of the locals if you live there, adopt a local name, speak the language and integrate with the community. This level of acceptance is unlikely to take place in a big town or city in the same way as it does in a small community. 

Although the village we live in might seem a little remote we are near the very touristic island of Bozcaada but we also have our own wonderful sandy beach at the bottom of the hill which gets local tourists from Istanbul and we live in an unspoiled area of Turkey in a region which is much cheaper than the tourist resorts. 

This has already been mentioned but you will need a car if you live in a Turkish village. We bought a new car when we first arrived but we hardly use it now. We have acquired one of those BMC ( Leyland Sherpa van - A la Turkish style ) flatbed pickups ( Kamyonet ) for around £2000 ( 2200 Euro or $2500 ) and then spent another TL2000 bringing up to tip top condition ( New tyres all round, new radiator, service, cv joint, track rod ends, etc etc - basically changed anything that was not in good condition ). Parts and insurance are cheap for these vehicles since they are made in Turkey and we bomb around everywhere in it. They are robust and ideal for village life which is why almost every village in Turkey has them.

Anyway, some great advice from Ken, JustinM and Ibrahim Ali  - Take a look at Ayvacik and Cunda Island as mentioned - You might find that is more to your liking albeit as Ibrahim has mentioned the water is colder than the south coast.

 

20180710_184338.jpg.a0c3d3b024958300e2b8cad650308aba.jpg

I agree with everything you said wholeheartedly. We fell in love with a small area near the ruins of Troy called Ciplak koy. The people, the town center, the natural beauty of the land and the closenes of the sea and canakkale made it an ideal place for us to look for a summer home. We are still searching, but hope to finalize something to be able to enjoy next summer.

These small villages and the countryside in this part of the country are untouched and downright beautiful. Food and local products are amazing! 
 

Great post.

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20 minutes ago, JustinM said:

I agree with everything you said wholeheartedly. We fell in love with a small area near the ruins of Troy called Ciplak koy. The people, the town center, the natural beauty of the land and the closenes of the sea and canakkale made it an ideal place for us to look for a summer home. We are still searching, but hope to finalize something to be able to enjoy next summer.

These small villages and the countryside in this part of the country are untouched and downright beautiful. Food and local products are amazing! 
 

Great post.

It's not for naturists is it?

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JustinM: One of our friends comes from Ciplak Koy. It is a nice typical Turkish village. Also Yeni Koy nearby is pretty cool and near to the sea. We live in Tavakli near Ezine. www.tavakli.net which you might have passed through. Good luck with your search and if you need any help re: Canakkale and the local area just contact me. 

IbrahimAbi: A naturist beach in Canakkale? Now that would be a first for Turkey :-)

 

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