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Do you need someone who knows turkish to apply for short term residence permit?

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I keep reading the process is simple but then when it comes down to to going to places and getting all the stamps, some have suggested that you need a person who speaks and/or understands Turkish. 

How do i find someone like that if it is indeed a need? 

Thanks. 
Zohair

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In many places, you'll find that "someone" there speaks at least some English. It might not be the person you are talking with, but someone else will come over and help.

If you don't have any Turkish friends, you "could" go to a translator, but they charge a lot of money. I talked to one recently and they said they charge 150 TL per hour for such services. However, if I was you, I would just walk around and talk to people in various shops in the local marketplaces and see if you can find someone who speaks English. Then offer to pay for their time. Even if they can't do it, they'll probably know somebody who will do it.

One thing I have done is just get to know someone, explain the situation, and get their mobile phone number. It could even be someone who works at the hotel or pension where you are staying. Then, when you go to a place and nobody speaks English, just give them a call, and ask them to translate what is being said as you pass the mobile phone back and forth with the person you are talking to.

Please let us know how things are going... it is always good to learn about how things are working from a person who is doing it for the first time.

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Thank you very much for the response. 

One other thing, is the guide that you wrote for getting a short term resident permit still valid? 

Plenty of other sites that have guides on the same topic have such a long procedure with documents running into 10s and 20s. 

On the official website and in your guide, there are about 6 documents that I need to apply for resident permit. 

Is health insurance from my original country acceptable or does it need to be from a Turkish company?

thanks for reading my message.

 

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It is up to date for everywhere but Istanbul... since I wrote it, rules came out for Istanbul which require a LOT more documentation (I need to write a separate article for Istanbul). I believe you contacted me privately and said you would be applying in Izmir. As far as I know, they are not asking for the many additional documents that Istanbul does.

If you go here:

E-ikamet website

And look at the lower right, you'll see "required documents." that will lead to a PDF file, from the DGMM, which lists all of the required documents. They should be the same as in the article. If they require any additional documents, they will let you know by SMS. And, during your appointment, if any are missing or inadequate, they will let you go and get them and bring them back (no appointment required).

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Is health insurance from my original country acceptable or does it need to be from a Turkish company? 

It has to be from a Turkish company, and you need to get a policy before you start the online application process. When you apply, on the website in the health insurance section, there is a drop-down list of insurance companies you can choose from. It only includes Turkish insurance companies.

Also you need to get your photos taken (biometric photos) before you apply online, because you will need to scan one of them and upload the image into the online system during the process. The photo you upload must be the same as the ones you will include with your hard-copy application.

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Thanks for the response again. 

One more confusion I would love for you to help me with. 

My passport says 'duration of stay' 30 days and visa validitiy '7 months'. 

What does that mean?

Does that still mean i have to apply for RP after 30 days?

Thank you again for taking the time out and reading my message. 

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Your passport says that, or your visa?

Since it is your home country which issued the passport, I cannot say with 100% certainty what it says or means, and Turkey issues different types of visas, with different validity periods and maximum periods of stay.

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My passport says 'duration of stay' 30 days

I would assume it is your visa which says that, not your actual passport. It "probably" means that the visa is valid for seven months, which would mean that you can use it any time during that seven months.

The "duration of stay" probably means that you can stay in Turkey for up to 30 days at any time during your visa's seven-month validity period. If that is the case, you must leave Turkey at the end of 30 days, unless you apply for a residence permit during that 30-day period. If you apply online within that 30-day validity period, and your application is accepted, the online system will give you a link to click on so you can download your completed application. With that completed (and accepted) residence permit application, you can continue to stay in Turkey until your appointment, even if you exceed the number of days you are allowed in Turkey with your visa.

So definitely don't wait until you have exceeded your 30 days to apply. You must apply, and have your application accepted in the online system, before you exceed 30 days in Turkey. If you wait until after you have exceeded the 30 days, you will be overstaying your visa, and you will not be allowed to apply for a residence permit.

One very important thing I forgot to mention. Be sure to call Turkey's residence permit assistance number. It is 157. You can call it from any telephone in Turkey. If you are outside of Turkey, call +90 312 157 1122. You can select an option to speak English. In this way you can verify, with the DGMM itself, anything you hear about the process, and ask them any questions you have directly.

For example, they may be able to tell you if any additional documents are required at the Izmir branch, or if, in Izmir, they ask for additional documents from citizens of your home country.

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Great. Great. Thank you for such a detailed response.

Now I understand a lot more than before.

So do you have some link or something where I can sign up for health insurance for me and my dad? 

Moreover, I am currently living in an airbnb space. 

Does that make a difference on my applciation or do I need to rent some space?

Thank you for taking the time out and responding to my questions. 

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Great to hear you've got a better understanding of the process. I'm keeping an eye on this topic in case you need any help, so if you have any other questions, feel free to ask. You can buy the health insurance, online, here:

Turkey Expat Health Insurance

The form goes to a broker in Fethiye. He works with several companies and can offer a good insurance plan, I also got mine from him. The price quote, according to the information you provide, is free of course. If you want to buy the insurance, you'll need to provide him a copy of your passports, that is because he wants to be absolutely sure there is no mistake in the information listed on the policy. You'll then pay by bank transfer. He'll create the policies and send you PDF copies with all pages (there are like 25 pages with all of the coverage, etc). Then he will send to you, by a cargo delivery company, the first three pages of the originals, which have the required stamps and signatures. It is those you need to take with you to your appointment (the DGMM only needs the first three pages).
 

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Moreover, I am currently living in an airbnb space. 

Does that make a difference on my applciation or do I need to rent some space?

 

That could be a problem, but one easily solved. If you were staying with a friend, you could use their address as your residence, but your friend would have to go to a noter (notary) and sign a document (a taahhutname, or "undertaking") in which he or she promises to be responsible for any debts you don't pay and to make sure you leave the country when your residence permit expires. Since it is Air B&B, the owner probably isn't going to do that.

If you move to a hotel, the manager of the hotel can provide a letter (on hotel letterhead) explaining that you are staying there, and provide your check-in and check-out dates, etc... So you could do it with a hotel.

Or you could rent an apartment, by the month or year, whichever you like. If you do that, you'll need to get a rental contract, then take the rental contract to a notary and get a notarized copy of the rental contract. The DGMM will need that notarized copy.

When you do find a permanent place to live, make sure you go to your local Nüfus ve Vatandaşlık Müdürlüğü (Population and Citizenship Directorate) with your passport, residence permit and your rental contract. They don't need a notarized copy of your rental contract, but they do need to see the original. They will also need your Yabancı Kimlik Numarası (Foreigner Identification Number) which will be printed on the front of your residence permit. They will register you at your address in their automated address system. If you don't do this you'll get fined.

You can try to make an online appointment with the Nüfus for this. You can do that here:

Nüfus Appointment Website

I say "try," because the last time I had to go there, their online system wouldn't take a foreigner ID number. The foreigner ID numbers start with "99" as the first two numbers. If they have updated their system to take a foreigner ID number, you can book an appointment online. If not, you'll need to go there and explain the situation, take a number, then wait for an opening. That is what I had to do last time. Take a book with you.

If you change your address later, you also will need to report your address change at the Nüfus, within 20 business days of your move. If you move to another province, you will also need to get a new residence permit from the new province... that is another topic entirely, I just mention it here in case you didn't know this.

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Thank you for the response. 

Just a couple of things more. 

If i am living in a hotel, how long does the proof of residence need to be? I mean , if i want to apply for 1 year, do i need to show that i have booked the hotel for one year?

I am living with my dad (my mum would not let me leave country without him), does he need a health insurance as well? 

He is over 65. 

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If i am living in a hotel, how long does the proof of residence need to be? I mean , if i want to apply for 1 year, do i need to show that i have booked the hotel for one year?

An immigration specialist I spoke with recently said that normally, if you use a hotel, the duration of the residence permit will not be longer than your stay at the hotel. So you would have to have a letter from the hotel, on hotel letterhead,  saying that you have booked for whatever period. Therefore, you would have to find a permanent place and get a rental contract for one year to get a residence permit for one year.

However,

If you intend to buy a property to live in, you can apply for a one or two-year residence permit, even though you are staying in a hotel or temporary place at the time.

You would just need to bring the letter or short-term contract to your appointment, then inform the immigration specialist that you are searching for a property to buy, or are in the process of buying a property. In that case, they can give you a one or two-year residence permit, even though at the time of the appointment you will be staying at a temporary location.

Later, after you get your tapu (title deed) showing that you own a property, take that to the DGMM office and let them know that you are now a property owner, and give them your new, permanent address. You will need to do this within 20 working days after you receive the tapu.

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I am living with my dad (my mum would not let me leave country without him), does he need a health insurance as well? 

He is over 65.

If he is over 65, health insurance is not required. So he doesn't need health insurance.

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I can tell you at this point that you can't get a student residence permit from inside Turkey. So you would have to apply for a short-term residence permit.

I haven't heard of a Turkish language course visa before, how did you get it? What does the visa say, exactly?

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apparently, the official website had two types of visas in this respect. one was the student visa and the other one was the turkish language course visa. 

and that is what it  says on my visa. 

under 'type of visa' it says turkish language course/ turcke dil kursu.

 

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apparently, the official website had two types of visas in this respect. one was the student visa and the other one was the turkish language course visa

So it seems to me that, since you got a visa to come for a Turkish language course, you now need to get a short-term residence permit for the purpose of attending the Turkish language course. And they should give you a short-term residence permit which lasts until the graduation date of your course. That would mean you also have to take, to your appointment, the documents from the school showing the course end date. Then, when that residence permit is within 60 days of expiring, and you want to stay in Turkey to live, you would have to apply again for another short-term residence permit.

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but can't i just apply for a toursit resident permit with the intention of buying a property after some months?

I doubt it, because in that case you don't yet have the intent to buy a property.

The above are just my opinions. It is best in these situations, or in any situation where the rules don't specifically address something, to talk to the DGMM and get the information from them.

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Thanks for the comment. 

I work online. 

And i came to Turkey to study the Turkish Language Course on the weekends, after finishing work during the week. 

But when i came here, Tomer (the turkish language course) said that they had stopped offering weekend classes.

From a purely time perspective I can't afford the weekday classes. 

But i would still like to live in Turkey for a while because i like the place. 

So can't I just go to the DGMM office (or to the e-ikamet website and straight up apply for a tourist resident permit), tell them the change of plans and then apply for a tourist short-term resident permit? 

Again, thanks for reading my message and being such a big help. 

Regards

 

 

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So can't I just go to the DGMM office (or to the e-ikamet website and straight up apply for a tourist resident permit), tell them the change of plans and then apply for a tourist short-term resident permit?

I don't know. There might be an issue with your visa, since you are not using the visa for the purpose it was intended. Did you get this visa from the e-visa website, or from a Turkish embassy or consulate? Is it a sticker that they placed onto one of the pages of your passport?

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Yes. it is a sticker on my passport. 

No, i did not get it from the e-website.

I did want to use the visa for its purpose but tomer, the language center, told me they had stopped offering weekend classes. 

With a job online (not freelance, but I actually work for a company), I am unable to attend the per-day 4-hour classes. 

Is this something i should tell the DGMM office so that they can give some sort of relaxation?

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I have never run across this situation before. People who come on regular student visas (which might be different from what you have) can apply for residence. So it might work, you can always try. But I think you should call the helpline and get the information directly from the DGMM.

The law isn't specific about people working online in Turkey if they are working for foreign companies. And the immigration specialists at the DGMM are probably not specialized in labor laws, but they are concerned about any foreigners working in Turkey. So if you are working, even if it is online, this may cause a problem during your interview. I say "may," because I don't have any specific information about situations like yours, and I don't know of anybody who has been in the same situation before.

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