Fusions

learning turkish language

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"Easy" is relative. For some it's easier than for others. But to give you an idea, Tömer, probably Turkey's premier language school, teaches Turkish to an intermediate level in eight months, then to an advanced level (with a university degree) in twelve months. I do know of someone who might be able to teach you Turkish, they also speak English, so that would help with explaining grammatical points. Let me ask and get back to you on that.

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Hi Fusion, welcome to Turkey Central. Both Ken and I have tried very hard to learn Turkish. He comes from America and I'm from UK,, we both found things easy and hard. I was particularly struck with how easy the grammar is to start with, all the verbs have similar endings and there is no gender in naming things so I loved how easy that was. Building a vocabulary is the hardest part in any language I think.

Your first language can make it easy or not so, depending on your own sentence structure. We English speaking people have the verb in various places in a sentence whereas any language that puts the verb at the end of a sentence has a head start with Turkish. Good luck with it.

C

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We used duolingo last year, my wife still uses it, they expect answers in American English, it may be difficult if you are an absolute beginner. Good luck

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It's a good start to get familiar with the language. I've used a few of the courses available online, one from the US government, and even took Turkish I and Turkish II at a university. Then I started going to Tömer and took three classes there, then at the local Turkish American Association.  I found the classes were getting away from me, because a lot of the other students worked in Turkey or were married to Turks and spoke the language daily. I didn't have that luxury. So now I am taking private lessons which go at my own pace.

The way I see it, you need to get to a certain "critical mass" where you can understand Turkish television and radio, read the newspaper and Turkish books. At that point you can expand your knowledge of Turkish on your own.

One problem I had with the online Turkish courses and books/recordings is that it doesn't really go into the breadth of how things are said. For example, for a situation you may only be given one conversation. But then when you are in that situation in reality, you will find that the Turk talking to you hasn't taken the same course! :)

Also, the online courses, etc., will get you to the point where you can do stuff like order in a restaurant, ask for and understand directions, and talk small talk, but when you have to go and talk to someone at the electric company, the Turkish they use is a lot more advanced.

So what I would recommend is doing the online courses, then go to classes, then if you have any trouble keeping up, get private lessons.

Another big advantage of the classes and private lessons is that you'll be speaking and hearing Turkish the whole time, which will help a lot with your comprehension and speaking ability.

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