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Average building age & renovation policy in Istanbul?

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THY

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Hello friends,

I have a question in my mind which I would like to share and ask. 

What is the average age of a building (Bina) in Istanbul? An apartment complex age as defined by Belediye laws?

If someone has an apartment in a building and after its age is over lets say after 40 years when the building is demolished and a new building is made on that plot; what happens to those who already owned an apartment in the old building? Are they accommodated or their money is finished as old building is gone and they need to buy another flat if they wish to live in the building?  What does law say about these two things and what is practice normally done?

 

Looking forward.

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  • 5 months later...

I don't think any of us can tell you the average age of buildings in Istanbul. Maybe the IBB has that information.

As to your other questions, provided a person legally owns (has a tapu (property title deed) in their name, an apartment in a building that is to be knocked down and rebuilt, they will be paid an agreed amount by the developer for moving expenses and rent for the period it takes to rebuild. How much and for how long will be determined in negotiations made and specified in the contract. Usually owners don't need to pay more money for the new apartment, unless of course this is negotiated with the developer because, for example. the new apartments will be bigger. However, if an owner doesn't agree to having the building knocked down and redeveloped, and they are in the minority, their apartment will be offered for sale to the other owners. If the other owners don't want to buy it, TOKI takes it over and auctions it off. This only happens if a person absolutely refuses to agree to the redevelopment but the majority of home owners want it.

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Hi Goreme, I remember a few years ago you said that your building was going to be renewed. Did it ever happen and if so how did it go for you? It's an interesting concept.

 

Çukurbağlı's blog. Warning - takes you off the forum and into the www.wilderness

 

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Interesting is not the word I would use! Initial talks were held about three years ago and the building was only just been knocked down in March of this year. In between we had numerous arguments (I have written a 3000 word essay on this I can't get published - I don't think anyone believes what I've written can possibly be true) and delays, including waiting for the son of one owner to get a POA. This process was initially held up because of summer court hiatus, then a first POA was granted but it was another 6 months before the son had permission to sign the contract on his mother's behalf. Just when that was about to happen, she died, so we had to wait for the inheritance to be sorted out (also delayed because of summer court hiatus). Just when everything seemed set to go, another owner died. In the meantime, we had to pay out our kapici who was retiring after 23 odd years (no one is exactly sure how long which led to, you guessed it, delays). As many of the owners were waiting to sign the redevelopment contract to get their rent and moving expenses money from the developer which they would then use to pay the kapici, that too was delayed. The poor man was living on nothing and naturally threatened to sue us. I paid him all the money on time and even now don't know what is happening with his court case and whether I'll be in trouble too even though I haven't done anything wrong. In theory our building will take 9-12 months to build but insallah, I will believe it when I see it.

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Wow. I can't think of anything else to say! :surprise:

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Phew! Well they say nothing is ever easy in Turkey and I suppose the more people that are involved the worse it gets. Thanks for posting that and I hope things move a bit better now. Kolay Gelsin.

 

Çukurbağlı's blog. Warning - takes you off the forum and into the www.wilderness

 

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Sometimes it is just as difficult to buy a piece of land. Due to the inheritance laws there may be multiple owners and if just one of the 'children' does not want to sell the whole thing can be stalled. The land next door to us has been unused for 12 years, three brothers who have fallen out own it, and they cannot sell it, as one brother wants a ridiculous amount of money for it, but no on will spend money to maintain it. Now half of the fruit trees have died despite there being an irrigation system in place and a lake at the bottom of the garden.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yes it's difficult IbrahimAbi, my MiL died a couple of months ago & her flat was transferred to her 3 offspring, but the 3 siblings have always been at odds with each other with no exception in this case.  The flat is up for sale but is in a terrible state of disrepair & really needs a bit of doing up in order to attract buyers, but the "owners" don't talk to each other, so yours truly is the go-between.. :( ..... sorry this thread seems to be rather going off on a tangent !

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  • 5 months later...
On 18/05/2017 at 4:27 PM, Goreme1990 said:

I don't think any of us can tell you the average age of buildings in Istanbul. Maybe the IBB has that information.

As to your other questions, provided a person legally owns (has a tapu in their name) an apartment in a building that is to be knocked down and rebuilt, they will be paid an agreed amount by the developer for moving expenses and rent for the period it takes to rebuild. How much and for how long will be determined in negotiations made and specified in the contract. Usually owners don't need to pay more money for the new apartment, unless of course this is negotiated with the developer because, for example. the new apartments will be bigger. However, if an owner doesn't agree to having the building knocked down and redeveloped, and they are in the minority, their apartment will be offered for sale to the other owners. If the other owners don't want to buy it, TOKI takes it over and auctions it off. This only happens if a person absolutely refuses to agree to the redevelopment but the majority of home owners want it.

I am sorry to hear about your unfortunate story. I hope things are good now for you.

 

My question is what is in it for the developer who is demolishing the old building and making a new building.. Giving you rent money until building is made and also give you money for transportation of your goods. And once done; the owners get a flat once again without paying anything.. What is in it for the developer in it???

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The developer always builds a new building with more apartments than in the original building. For example, in my building (still not finished) there were originally 10 apartments and 2 shops. The new building will have 18 apartments and 2 shops. The extra 8 apartments belong to the developer. This is how they make a profit.

 

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