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Relocating to Turkey - Ideas Needed

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Hi,

 

I look forward to relocating to Turkey with my wife and parents. I need ideas about what would be the most suitable place for my family. Im looking at 4-bed villas. Although I've read about health insurance and residency, still wanted to clarify somethings.1) What would be the ideal place to live. My preference is not a big city, but not a small town either. Something with population between 100k to 500k. With things to do: Cinemas, bowling alleys, restaurants, concerts etc. I'm looking at suburbs and away from crowd and noise. Would also like to know which option would be most economic in terms of housing. Currently I'm looking at Fethiye & Bodrum but I suspected both are small towns? Population seem to be below 100k for both. Do you think one could have a home in towns like them? Not a holiday home but a home.

 

2) Also I would ideally like places with great schools and hospitals. I would never compromise on education for (unborn) child so I'm certainly considering that.

 

3) Something with some business opportunities. Not a big business, but a small grocery store or a convenience store. 

 

4) About health insurance, my parents are covered by the government in their home country. Would they not need health insurance for the RP? Does that mean only me and my wife will need to purchase health insurance. I have heard the govt. charges per couple (and dependent children). So does that mean just one insurance for 200 TL per month would be sufficient?

 

5) Are there any other recurring or big costs associated with relocation other than: Purchasing a house, paying for the RP, paying for health insurance.

 

Would appreciate any info / help. Thanks in advance!

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Hi,

 

Istanbul actually combines many small villages where you can actually feel quiet and be relatively far from the mess, each area with its own entertainment, shopping centers, etc, yet you still get to live closer to where most jobs are. Look at places like Kucukcekmece (you can live closer to the city center at a reasonable price too - it's up to your budget) There are new and quiet neighborhoods and buildings and the rates are considerably cheaper. 

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Re point 3) Turkish business laws are quite specific. You may own a business, but you cannot work in it. Therefore you could not own and run a grocery store. I also doubt you woul dmake enough money from this to support your family. In addition, foreigners can only work in Turkey if they are doing a job a Turk cannot do. The laws concerning foreigners with residence are not similar to other countries. You need to do your homework before you come here.

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Good advice from Goreme1990, do a lot of homework before you come. Then come for a visit on a tourist visa and examine the places where you THINK you might want to live. As Goreme says, working here is a problem that you need to address while you are visiting. At least two, long visits, would be best unless you have the money to come with a large family and live for an extended period of time ( 1 or 2 years) until you are able to find what you are looking for.

 

If you want to live in the Med Coast region, many people seem to like Fethiye which is around 50,000 population. It is not my favorite place because I like smaller towns and villages, but many of its residents rave about it. The local online newspaper is Land of Lights, read it for local details.

 

Fethiye is conveniently located, it is on the sea, close to mountains, and it is less than an hour from Dalaman airport with two very good hospitals, one of which is private. There are some private schools in Fethiye, I know nothing about the quality of the state schools.

 

Good luck

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yeah, yr chances of working are pretty slim unless you find an international company to work for before you get here, or do freelance or online work. most people teach english, but as you're not from what the MoE would consider a native english-speaking nation (and yes, i know english is prevalent where you're from. i don't make the rules, i just report 'em) your chances of getting a job as an english teacher are next to none. that being said, if you're adament about living here, you can look at bahcesehir (see the link in my signature), it's about 30km outside of istanbul, very quiet upper-middle class family-friendly area that's far enough from the city to feel like you're not in it, but close enough to get there easily enough when you want to

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IstanbulWhiteboy the Samanyolu group hires Engish teachers that are non-native english speakers, but they have to be very proficient. The salary is good, but the kids are a big pain in the butt. It's a deeply religious islamic group & the male & female teachers are serregrated. Seperate lunch room, staff room, seperate meetings, seperate transport, eveything. I worked there for a short while but it was too stressful. Kids there were the worst. I entered thinking, yeah a religious school they'll be a bunch of angels, but it did not work out that way lol Posted Image

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Thank you everyone for all the info..

I'll be looking into both Kucukcekmece & bahcesehir and I've already done my research on Fethiye.

 

@IstanbulWhiteboy & @Goreme1990 I work from home as software-dev for a US based company so I've got my bills covered. Was just hoping to have a side-income through a small business as I will be adding up to my expenses when I relocate but I just read that I can't work in my own business :/What about tax laws? I read a clause which "appeared" that I may be eligible for a tax holiday"the salaries paid by a non-resident employer from sources outside of Turkey. This exemption is specifically applicable for salaries of representative office (liaison office) employees."

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As with everything else here, "ya takes yur chances" and nothing may happen, but then again...

 

I know a lot of foreign residents who work "under the table" here, you could probably help people with "computer stuff" and not be on the tax man's "hit list."  If you live in an area where there are lots of foreigners and you remain low profile and do not anger someone enough that they call someone about you, it may work OK for you.

 

Good luck

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HI Guys

I am new here , I am Turkish but spent  better part of the last  30+ years in Texas now looking to move back  in few years

I am not even sure where to start asking questions but once i have initiated the conversation I think it'll l get deeper

for the starters , what are you all's thoughts on  living in somewhere in the south after staying out of the country for a such a  long time ?

any thought ? thanks in advance.

Cihan

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HI Guys

I am new here , I am Turkish but spent  better part of the last  30+ years in Texas now looking to move back  in few years

I am not even sure where to start asking questions but once i have initiated the conversation I think it'll l get deeper

for the starters , what are you all's thoughts on  living in somewhere in the south after staying out of the country for a such a  long time ?

any thought ? thanks in advance.

It would be more helpful if you could be as specific as the OP was about work, family size and ages, income, size of town/city preferences, climate, etc. List your preferences here and I am sure you will get many good answers. It would even help if you told us where you lived in Texas, Austin (a bit more leebeerul), San Antonio (Mexican flavor), Houston/Dallas (big business/oil/cattle/lawyers conservative).

 

Read the above replies to the OP and then come to visit some of the places you THINK you may want to live. Try to come for a month or more and spend some time in 2 or 3 different regional areas which you thin may appeal to you.

 

It ain't TexAss for shore podner... (No ice houses in Turkey for example)

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HobbitTR thanks for the response,  here some details
Age : 55
Born in Turkey and left at age 18 so very fluent in Turkish and has family in Istanbul/Bursa
Single
Lived in Austin. San Antonio, Houston, Minneapolis, Seatlle and San Jose
Currently employed in IT business (with a  computer science degree)
a strict vegetarian
Looking to retire, where are all the Americans?  smile.png
would not need to work but it might not be bad idea to do so,
and will be there to explore early summer

thanks

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There aren't too many Americans in Turkey except for around cities which have a US military presence like Ankara, Incirlik, and Izmir. Or Istanbul.  There are several in Antalya that I know of. Unfortunately Turkey isn't a place where a lot of Americans retire, I think retired American expats mostly head down to places like Costa Rica these days! :)

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HobbitTR thanks for the response,  here some details

Age : 55

Born in Turkey and left at age 18 so very fluent in Turkish and has family in Istanbul/Bursa

Single

Lived in Austin. San Antonio, Houston, Minneapolis, Seatlle and San Jose

Currently employed in IT business (with a  computer science degree)

a strict vegetarian

Looking to retire, where are all the Americans?  smile.png

would not need to work but it might not be bad idea to do so,

and will be there to explore early summer

thanks

We live in a village near Kaş on the Mediterranean Coast of Turkey

 

Many retirees live on the Med Coast of Turkey from Bodrum through Antalya and beyond. Most of the retirees who live in or near Kaş are from the UK or Germany who make great neighbours and friends. As Ken says, not many from the US.

 

We are also vegetarian, it is not difficult to eat out here. When we say "et yemiyoruz" the waiters who do not know us reply with "Ah, tavuk var, balık var..." Sometimes we are asked why we are vegetarians. Otherwise as long as we specify that our food be cooked in "zeytinyağı" and not  with fish, chicken or meat fat, we are just fine. "  Vegetables and fruits prices are rising but tourists still speak about how cheap they are compared to the UK or the US--and they are fresh.

 

There are at least two retired IT guys who live here, each started their own companies and were highly successful. One lives here full-time, the other seasonal. Kaş is a mix of local villagers and Turkish "expats" who cater to tourists and adventure sports, there are more scuba-diving outfits here than anywhere else in Turkey.  The Turkish "expats" are mostly from Ankara or Istanbul and got tired of the rat race and came here for a simpler life.

 

Foreigners can buy and/or build in Turkey but you should be here a while before you make such a decision. There are many rental properties for year-round occupancy from very cheap to quite expensive.

 

I suggest you come for either the month of April or May if you plan to come in early summer. The "official" tourist season for all the Coast is April 01 to the end of October. Since all the tourist venues will be open you will get an opportunity to experience the reataurants, bars and other activities offered during the season. It will be very comfortable weather with cool nights and warm sunny days.

 

Prices go up for accommodation after April 01 but if hotels and pansions are not full they will often give a discount if you ask for one. Most Turkish tourists always ask for one. If you make reservations you should not be asked for a credit card except in Istanbul or perhaps Ismir or Ankara. Rental cars are expensive, try to reserve a diesel if you plan to drive around. Gasoline is the equivalent of 10 US dollars per gallon!!!

 

More questions? Hope this helps

 

I am sure there are others who will want to add their favourite places to live.

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