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Earthquake saturday 28th of December '13

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We were just home, and all over sudden the building started moving.. we both stood up from the sofa, looked at eachother and the same time we did run to the frontdoor downstairs outside our garden.

All neighbours came out.

After 30 minutes we went inside again, but both of us still in shock.

It was the second earthquake in 2 weeks time.

2 weeks before 5.2, and the last one was a 6.0 .. 90 years ago, in 1923, there was for the last time an earthquake of this magnitude.

Well, we are just small creatures next to 'Mother Nature' ..

No damage, no people killed or hurted..god thanks!!

 

For people who are thinking it is only happening this part of the world..no, daily the ground of the earth is moving.

For earthquake information in Turkey, you can check the following link :

 

http://www.koeri.boun.edu.tr/scripts/lst6.asp

 

 

 

 

 

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I was speaking to someone dear to me in Antalya Saturday evening and he was telling me about the earthquake.  I'm so glad everyone is safe.  I live in California, so we are not strangers to earthquakes, I know that they can be scary. They certainly have a way of reminding us of our place, don't they.

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I was speaking to someone dear to me in Antalya Saturday evening and he was telling me about the earthquake.  I'm so glad everyone is safe.  I live in California, so we are not strangers to earthquakes, I know that they can be scary. They certainly have a way of reminding us of our place, don't they.

Yes, they certainly do :)

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I didn't run outside, I just stayed where I was. Although I am not particularly concerned about earthquakes, I do prefer to live on the top floor (I have a rooftop apartment with a big terrace now) so if the building does come down suddenly, at least I'll be on top!  From what a developer told me, with the new earthquake regulations, since 2000, buildings in Turkey now have to be able to withstand a 10.0 magnitude earthquake.

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that's great to hear about the buildings, Ken.  I know that after the myriad of earthquakes here in California, the buildings are a fairly safe place to be during an earthquake.  Sometimes, however, they're so sensitive, that it only takes one good semi truck to rock the building :)

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I heard an anecdotal account about the big earthquake we had in Izmit in 1999. Turks were running downstairs and they encountered Japanese tourists running upstairs. The Japanese got to the top floor, or the roof, and lived, while the Turks running downstairs died when the building collapsed. I think that's probably just an urban legend. But since these things happen so fast (or in the middle of the night) and one may not have time to get out, I'd rather be on the top floor than a middle floor or the ground floor. If rescuers come to dig people out, at least I'll be on the top of it all.  Not to mention having no worries about burglars. Or the nice view I have, even if it's mostly a sea of satellite dishes and water tanks.

 

I understand there's a debate about whether it's safer to get near a strong support inside the building or run outside. If you run outside, you have a greater risk of getting hit by falling glass, roof shingles, cladding, or whatever. These tend to fall off buildings during earthquakes and are responsible for more injuries and deaths than anything else.

 

What do they tell you to do, in case of an earthquake, in California?

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Ken,

 

In California, we're taught to be prepared from an early age.  I remember being in grade school participating in earthquake drills.  In the Los Angeles area, where I am, they take earthquakes pretty seriously and even have Earthquake awareness days where schools, businesses, and families are encouraged to participate in drills.

  • First and foremost, there is an emphasis on having an emergency kit at hand.  This should include a first aid kit, bottled water, non-perishable foods, a can opener, batteries, a radio, blanket, shoes, cash, camping stove, pet food (for your pets), a list of phone numbers, small tool kit (or at least a wrench) and any medication.  There should be enough for your family for at least 3 days. [*]If you're indoors, get under a table, or stand against an interior wall. Stay away from exterior walls, windows, unsecured heavy objects (like a hutch, water heater, etc).  Here a lot of people will secure heavy furniture to walls, just in case of an earthquake. [*]If outdoors, get out into the open, away from any structures. [*]If driving, pull over and stop your vehicle away from any structures, avoid bridges. [*]If near the Ocean, move to higher ground

After the earthquake,

  • Check for fire or fire hazards.  Check for the smell of gas, shut off the main gas valve if you smell gas. If there is an chance of electrical hazards, turn off the electricity from the main power box. [*]Check for fallen/broken items. [*]If you leave, tell another person where you are going.   [*]Keep the phone lines clear, unless there's an emergency. [*]Turn on a news source

In school, we were always taught NOT to go outside during the earthquake. Find somewhere safe and stay indoors until the swaying stopped, then move outdoors only after it was safe to do so.  Then we would stay outside, far away from any structures, until the building was deemed safe to return.

Aftershocks -- there are always aftershocks, so be prepared for those.  Sometimes they're smaller than the original earthquake, but sometimes they can be bigger.  Aftershocks, usually happen within the next few days after the original shock, in my experience (but I'm no expert).

We had 2 pretty big earthquakes when I was a student, and then we had a few while working in offices -- and many of them while at home.  Now I pretty much just roll over and go back to sleep unless I hear something break.  But it does get the heart racing every time!

Hope this helps!

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