rasheed

Considering Move to Turkey - need advice

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Hi Everyone,

Apologies in advance if this isn't the appropriate sub-forum for my question. Had a look everywhere & wasn't sure of the right place.

 

Anyway, I'm a UK expat currently living in Egypt. I've actually live abroad for since 1997 - mainly in Arab countries working in IT. As I'm sure everyone is aware - Egypt is really in a mess now. I live here with my family & we have young children & really don't think it's the right environment for us anymore.

 

I am seriously considering a potential move to Turkey very soon. My work is based online & I'm able to earn a living anywhere I can have a stable Internet connection. I am also looking to register either a branch of my company or a separate company altogether.

 

We have a large young family (the kids study online) & we're looking for suggestions for a simple, conservative traditional environment but it must be well connected Internet-wise. I would appreciate suggestions - I'm planning to visit within a couple of weeks to check place out.

 

Thanks!

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Sorry I can't help but I am interested in online job if probably u are able to establish one here in Turkey. I live in Antalya/Turkey

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Hello Rasheed,

Your questions are very vague e.g. 'simple, conservative traditional environment but it must be well connected Internet-wise'. Does this mean a village with good internet connections.?

'A large young family' are you looking for a large house in a village with good internet connections?

How old are the children - do they speak any Turkish ?

Provide some more specific details and members on the forum will try to advise

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Ok - the specifics!

We have 6 children ranging from 1-15 - they are home/internet schooled - so the availability of schools is not so important.

What I meant about the environment is - that we would prefer a quiet area - we're not too into 'city-life'. We don't really miss too much from back home. We'd prefer to live in a simple, country environment and prefer to eat local natural produce.

What you said about 'a large house in a village with good internet connections' is what we're looking for. A city/large town is not out of the question as long as it's in an area away from traffic & night-life - suburbs would be ok but village life is preferable.

We do not know any Turkish language though but are willing to learn quickly as we enjoy learning new languages & cultures. The family is pretty much bilingual English/Arabic now.

Thanks!

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Selam aleykum!

My husband's from Izmit. It's 1 1/2 hours from Istanbul, but a small town. Modern and fully technologically functioning. My in-laws are very spiritual people and mommie even runs a prayer house. I think you would like it there. Many markets with local produce and such. If my in-laws feel comfortable there with their practices, then I'm sure you would, too.

There's also Konya, where her relatives are from. There's much Sufism there due to Mevlana/Rumi. But since it's a tourist area, there's also the internet.

I'm sorry you are considering having to leave your country, but I think you would love Turkey and I think it admirable that you want to do the best for your family.

Best of luck.

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Many (most?) Turkish villages have ADSL through phone lines. The Turkish government said they would "wire" all cities, towns and villages by the end of 2008, and by most estimates did just that but nearly a year late.

We live in a village of roughly 200 local residents and we have ADSL. Posted Image That being said, the connection speeds will be, in many cases, not what you will get in larger cities. Posted Image We are supposed to be capable "of up to 8 Mbps" download speeds which is the norm for non-fibreoptic connections. That being said, our local TTNET office told us that 4 Mbps would be our maximum without infrastructure improvements which, they say, will not happen soon. Posted Image We are in the process of making a formal complaint which might get results soon, a long time from now, or never... Posted Image

Cukurbagli, a forum member, lives on the opposite side of the same village and he has much higher speeds because TTNET put a fibreoptic line in to connect from a switching station to a village much farther away and he is connected to it.

If Internet connectivity is a must for you then you should consult with the local provider (usually TTNET the phone company) to see what the actual speeds would be in the village AND the house you are considering to buy or rent. It also has to do with the quality of the phone lines running to the house. If they are really old, you can have a lot of line noise which can cause connection problems. If you have a new phone line coming into the village and to your home, if you are 1 to 2 Km away from the switch/repeather, and if...if...if... then you might get 8 Mbps on an average day. Without fibreoptic connections you will get nothing faster.

Here is the TTNET web page, use Chrome and Google Translate if you do not understand:

http://www.ttnet.com.tr/bireysel/internet/ttnetadslinternet/Sayfalar/TTNET-ADSL.aspx

and their FiberNet page:

http://www.ttnet.com.tr/bireysel/internet/ttnetfibernet/Sayfalar/TTNET-Fibernet.aspx

If you do not do a lot of downloading (films, music, operating systems, etc.) you might find 3g a possible option.

TurkCell seems to provide to most coverage as compared to Vodafone and Avea. TurkCell offers a 3g device mounted on or in your home which broadcasts Wi-Fi up to 8 devices in the home. Here is that home solution:

http://www.turkcell.com.tr/bireysel/Sayfalar/internet/evdeninternet/genel.aspx

This is also filled with a lot of IF's. You should make sure that in your village and in your house, you can get somewhere near the advertised speeds which they advertise. You will have to first find a "Turkcell Communication Center OR Negotiated Chain Store" because only they can set you up and sell you the device. Not every store with TurkCell on the store front can do this.

All that will take a lot of doing and negotiation.

This is about the USA but it has some good tips in it: How to buy Cellular Modem

Good luck...

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I appreciate the replies.

Perhaps I stressed the Internet part too much - pretty much any connection of 1MB & above is enough for my work - we only get about 2MB max here on ADSL. Turkey seems to be much better connected than Egypt anyway.

I'd like to get a picture of your general experiences from the Turkish people towards immigrants. I'm a British Muslim (convert) of mixed Euro-Asian heritage and have lived and worked in numerous countries & have experienced many attitudes. We like mixing with the people where we live & don't really have the fairly typical Brit expat enclave mentality - we're not trying to make a little England wherever we live!

To give you an example without mentioning the name of the place. We moved to a place that I had visited many times before that was renowned for the people's gentle, soft, welcoming nature but after moving there we found that their attitude towards immigrants was very different than towards visitors/tourists!

When I visit, I was thinking to maybe spend a little time travelling around - would it be better to rent a car or is the public transport network sufficient?

Thanks!

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Turkish people reacting to immigrants? Every place you go in Turkey can, and will, give up different experiences. That being said, virtually all the tourists and most of the expats I personally know comment upon the friendliness and neighborliness of Turkish people. Posted Image Your experiences may be different.

If, as you say, you do not have a "typical Brit expat enclave mentality" (whatever that may be) then you should have few social difficulties. I have never experienced a hostile or unfriendly Turkish person Posted Image with 2 exceptions, Posted Image a crazy neighbor (who is now deceased), and a cab driver who almost ran me over and responded negatively to the shout and obscene gesture I made to him. Posted Image Whether I am extremely lucky or there is a lesson to be learned, I do not know. Posted Image

Come, see, and you will probably stay.

Driving vs taking public transport? Take the public transport and rent a car when it is absolutely necessary. Cars can be expensive to rent and gasoline is the most expensive in the world! Posted Image Public transport will help you meet a lot of different people, tourists, expats/immigrants, and Turks. Public transport goes everywhere, the long distance buses are extremely moder, comfy and air-conditioned. Most local transport is more than adequate all the way up to very comfortable and many have air-conditioning. (Something you will appreciate in the summer months along the southern coast.)

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I hope I don't get shot for saying this, but it's only based on my (admittedly limited) experience.

As long as you aren't in the tourist areas (which you will NOT be!), then it's been my take that there really aren't that many other people in Turkey besides Turks- in GENERAL. But you are also Muslim, so you have that going for you. Just don't interpret stares of interest as judgment. And don't expect a friendly smile (like I would in the States). That would be too invasive.

I'd not overthink it too much, considering I'd think Egypt would be a lot more of a switch compared to Turkey.

Talk to Conan on here- he's Chinese (I think) and just relocated to Turkey.

As for public transport, I agree- better than a car. As is anywhere. But sometimes the busses get VERY crowded and I'd get claustrophobic. Not as bad as Tokyo, but you get the image. And stinky!

Any thought to the two places I suggested??? Konya might be good, since they see a lot of internationals... Also has a lot of rural areas, but public transport.

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I've lıved ın Turkey for a long long tıme and Turks are very hospıtable and frıendly and go out of their way to help you.

I think Turks are also very tolerant people - much more so than the typical European in my experience.

On the outskirts of Antalya there is Kundu Village which is very rural, but just a short 10-minute ride to the beach. From Kundu Village into the centre of Antalya it takes around 50 minutes on the bus so you've really got the best of 2 worlds (if you want it). Kundu itself is full of large hotels and tourists, but just 10 minutes beyond you've got village life pure!

Jade

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Good job you only need 1MB for your job. We lived in Istanbul, told we would have 8 and only ever had 2!!Back in UK now, it's far cheaper, and we're getting 30. I can't imagine getting good connection in a village, ours constantly dropped. Not knowing the language will put you in a vulnerable position as far as official-dom and shopping is concerned - you'll be an easy target for a rip off. Good luck though, I'm sure you'll feel safer than in Egypt.

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I really appreciate all the advice. I'll be coming to Turkey without the family for an initial visit on the 10th September & I think I'll travel around a bit until I find a suitable place.

Our area in Egypt is relatively calmer than the rest of Egypt for now. We've still had a few people killed by the army though. But travel has become very difficult. Anyone that looks remotely religious gets taken off of public transport at checkpoints & is 'investigated'. If you're lucky you'll be released after a few hours if not you'll disappear. It's become a total police state - even worse than before the revolution. The government/army are also paying armed gangs to beat up bearded or veiled women in the streets. Remaining here has become a liability.

I hope Turkey gives us a way out!

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I'm sure you will find somewhere suitable for you and your family in Turkey but if your wife is covered I would suggest you avoid the holiday areas especially around Izmir as, although there are covered ladies here, they are in the minority with lots of people wearing shorts and strappy tops and she would probably feel more comfortable in a more conservative area.

I wish you good luck in your hunt.

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