Jump to content

How Can I Find a Good Job Teaching English in Izmir?

Rate this topic


Recommended Posts

 

 

You say you are Turkish, do you hold Turkish citizenship? It would make things a whole lot easier if you decided to find a job here.

 

Actually, I have found it to be a huge disadvantage to have Turkish citizenship in terms of teaching English.  Two state universities in Izmir offered me a job and then had to rescind when they found out that I actually have Turkish citizenship (I'm American and got my Turkish citizenship last year through my Turkish husband).  Basically, because of the Turkish citizenship, I cannot be considered a native.  That means that in order to be hired at a state university, I would have to take the tests all the Turkish teachers have to take in order to get hired there, unless I want to work part-time, which pays very, very, very little.  Some private universities may still be willing to hire a person with dual citizenship; also high schools and elementary schools, as well as language schools.  

 

In my experience, the best jobs are not advertised.  The best way to get a job is to visit schools in person when you are in Izmir.  Once living here, you will make friends and meet people and new opportunities will arise. 

 

Hope this helps--

Link to post
Share on other sites

Having experienced life both as a foreigner and as a citizen I would say the latter is preferable as I now have tenure in my post instead of an annual contract.

Fil!  That's fantastic!  Congratulations! Posted Image 

There is, though, a bit of a difference between you and most of us who are teaching EFL in Turkey.  If I remember correctly, you are a bona fide academic with a Ph.d and an impressive set of credentials, teaching in an academic department, not the hazirlik school.  That said, maybe it is different in your school; maybe they would hire a dual citizen and consider that person a native.  (If this is the case, I'd love to know!)  Dilem23 did indicate that she was specifically looking for work in Izmir, and at least in two of the state universities and one of the private universities in Izmir, having dual citizenship is a disadvantage.  One private high school also balked; they decided to make me an offer, but I wouldn't be "official," I'd have to hide/not work if the government regulatory body visited, and they would not give references for me as a teacher (but would as a "worker" there) in the future.  I haven't pursue leads with other high schools to confirm that dual citizenship is a problem across the board.  

 

I think it's important to communicate both the advantages and disadvantages of having/not having Turkish citizenship, especially vis a vis employment opportunities in teaching English, which is such a major source of employment for native speakers.  A good friend of mine here in Izmir, American-born with Turkish citizenship, recently gave up his Turkish citizenship, when he met the same walls I did.  I'm not quite there yet, but I've considered it.  Certainly it would open up my options if indeed what I want to do is teach English at a hazirlik school for a university, especially a state university.

 

This all said, I did get on with a private university last year, Dilem.  And other places that are not state schools, (i.e. the high school I mentioned and another private university) while disappointed to hear I had Turkish citizenship, have offered  to try to find a work-around for the problem. Of course language schools are also an option, one that will welcome Turkish citizens.   So there are opportunities and possibilities.  It was just really surprised to find that my citizenship would work against me at all in terms of finding employment.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you quinn.

 

I do think everyone's situation is unique in some way, but I don't think my position is so different. There will always be swings and roundabouts concerning different stauses, and it is likely to be impossible to predict the consequences of any course of action before actual embarking on that course of action.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Having experienced life both as a foreigner and as a citizen I would say the latter is preferable as I now have tenure in my post instead of an annual contract.

 

Fil, in an earlier thread you mentioned that foreigners get paid around double that of Turkish citizens. Now that you are a citizen, have you suffered a salary reduction (because of it)?

 

My daughter (dual citizen) has just earned her PhD, and considering her options ....... hence the query. Posted Image

Link to post
Share on other sites

Meral, my contributions have suggested that the pay differential is something of a myth. People are certainly told that they get paid more as a foreigner, that may be intended to make the foreigners more pliable and the locals resentful, divide and rule. Foreigners are not entitled to overtime, whereas locals are, and the foreign staff can be asked to do many extra hours. Currently I earn 150TL less than I did as a foreigner, in the same type of job. In my previous job, after overtime payments, my colleagues were receiving more than me most months. Yet they constantly told me, and repeated to each other, that I received three times the pay of a local member of staff. In the private sector, mrs fil used to receive the same pay as her foreign colleague, and mrs fil worked part-time, the foreigner full-time.

My advice is always to negotiate, and not to believe what is said about other people's pay without seeing the bordro.

As for your daughter's situation, I do think it is difficult for a young person working in Turkey, particularly if in a first job and if female, people's hierarchical attitudes are very strong. It might be an idea for her to build up her CV elsewhere before testing the waters in Turkey.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Fil, for the sound advice...... it makes sense.  She's actually not keen on working in Turkey (just as she wasn't keen on studying here).

 

Everything can't always be measured in terms of the money -- as in your case, 150TL is a negligible sum to forfeit for the security of tenure!   :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...