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AntonyNobrega

Work Permit And 'exceptional Case' Status

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Hi,

I will try to keep this question simple as I could really use some advice from anybody who has experience of this particular situation.

Me and my wife currently live in London. She is a Turkish citizen and currently in Turkey finishing up writing her PhD. Once she finishes we plan on finalising our plans to move to Izmir as she has a potential job offer there and we have a house we can live in.

My question is would I automatically be considered as an 'Exceptional Case' as stated on the CSGB - Ministry of Labour and Social Security Department's website?

I need help to understand how this works in practice and any details, advantages etc. I have just joined the forum, so I am navigating my way around to discover as much as I can but I have never moved abroad or dealt with these issues, so just trying to get some clarity matters.

Many thanks in advance

Antony

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I can't recall anyone on the forum having any experience of this, I'm afraid.

What sort of work were you hoping to get? Most foreigners either work for foreign companies or end up teaching English.

To employ a foreigner, a company must have at least 5 Turkish worker for every foreigner and generally foreigners are prohibited from work that a Turk could do.

DEAD LINK

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Thanks Sunny,

If I can find a job working for a foreign company then that would be great...if I can find one. Alternatively, teaching english would be my only other real possibility. I am trying to complete a TEFL course as quickly as possible. Having spoken to some local friends of my wife's in Izmir they suggested that I would have no problem getting a job at a school as native speaker even without a TEFL qualification. Nevertheless I am trying to get one as this would obviously go some way to helping. As for the work permit I am trying to figure out exactly what this means:

"The exceptional cases are:1. Foreigners married to Turkish Citizens; Foreigners married to a Turkish citizen and living in Turkey with their spouse in the marital union, and who stay in Turkey legally without being subject to any condition of time for residence, may apply directly to the Ministry for exceptional work permit."

From reading this again, I am not sure it applies to someone who has just arrived in Turkey but a foreigner who is married to Turkish citizen "without being subject to any condition of time for residence". But I don't know when that comes into play.

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I have read on other forums where spouses of Turkish nationals living in Turkey have applied for this type of WP and have been turned down and don't know of anyone who gained one this using this method of application. I know it used to be that you had to have been married for 3 years but it looks like it has changed as they have now changed the wording.

I don't know how long you have been married, but if you have been married longer than 3 years you could always apply for Turkish Citizenship, which would of course solved your WP problem. However, it may cause you another problem because as you are a man and also young you would run the risk being called up for National Service.

I noticed at the bottom, on the left hand side of the CSGB webpage there is a contact section and suggest your wife give them a call and ask them directly. If she does we would be very grateful if you could update us.

Good luck Posted Image

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Same here, unfortunately.

"The exceptional cases are:1. Foreigners married to Turkish Citizens; Foreigners married to a Turkish citizen and living in Turkey with their spouse in the marital union, and who stay in Turkey legally without being subject to any condition of time for residence, may apply directly to the Ministry for exceptional work permit."

It used to be that foreigners actually had to leave Turkey and apply for a work permit in their own, or another, country. I think that has changed now, or there are exceptions where you can apply for a work permit while in Turkey, without having to leave. To me, the line above is saying that if you are here with your spouse, you can APPLY for a work permit without leaving the country. It isn't saying you will get one, and I seriously doubt you would except under the circumstances already discussed here.

I have never heard of a foreigner getting a work permit for a job in Turkey that a Turk could not do. That would be the real test of whether you can work in Turkey, and why so many foreigners either teach English or work for their own government or company in Turkey.

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I have never heard of a foreigner getting a work permit for a job in Turkey that a Turk could not do. That would be the real test of whether you can work in Turkey, and why so many foreigners either teach English or work for their own government or company in Turkey.

The work permit issue seems to vary greatly from region to region. There are a number of foreigners working in the tourism industry in Cappadocia with valid work permits. Most of them are doing work that could be done by a qualified Turkish person, but the problem is that qualified Turkish people do not want to work in Cappadocia. So the work permit application goes through with no problem since the onus is on the employer to prove that he has solid reasons for hiring a foreigner rather than a Turk.

Obviously the situation in Izmir is different as the offer and demand is far wider.

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"The exceptional cases are:

1. Foreigners married to Turkish Citizens; Foreigners married to a Turkish citizen and living in Turkey with their spouse in the marital union, and who stay in Turkey legally without being subject to any condition of time for residence, may apply directly to the Ministry for exceptional work permit."

From reading this again, I am not sure it applies to someone who has just arrived in Turkey but a foreigner who is married to Turkish citizen "without being subject to any condition of time for residence". But I don't know when that comes into play.

If you do not have a job, then does the law allow you to apply for a work permit to go find one? My (university) employers applied for the work permit for me, I never had to "dirty" my hands to get one. That would be a question you should ask the authorities, does this exception allow you to search, or do you have to have the job first and then apply? By the way, bring a gas mask Posted Image

Good luck

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It's been a while since I had one (2007), but at that time you had to apply from outside of the country and also have a company in Turkey which submits paperwork to the Ministry of Labor. Since the work permit is for a specific job (you can't go from job to job with the same permit), I would assume it's still the same--both the person wanting the permit and the company he or she will be working for have to submit paperwork.

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I am trying to complete a TEFL course as quickly as possible. Having spoken to some local friends of my wife's in Izmir they suggested that I would have no problem getting a job at a school as native speaker even without a TEFL qualification.

It depends on what sort of job you want. Yes, you could probably get a job at a dershane (language school), but the chances of it being a good one that would apply for a work permit and SGK is unlikely. To get a work permit a TEFL qualification is usually required along with a degree, preferably in English and the same applies if you want to work in a private school or university.

Anyway, you should take the TEFL seriously as most native English speakers know little about their grammar and the course will help you, especially in the first few months of teaching, to get to grips with it.

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Thanks again Sunny,

I have a degree but not in English, it is in Communication Studies. I work in a university library and have done for over five years. Perhaps this might help as it shows that I have experience of working with students and some (fairly minor) experience of assisting in classes.

I am trying my best with the TEFL course. But it is a bit difficult at the moment what with working full-time and the day-to-day problems that come up. I agree with what you say about grammar as I have just finished the first module and...I will have to really study in the next couple of months. Nothing is set in stone but if we move and if I can get some kind of job, teaching or otherwise (but almost everyone says that teaching is the most and maybe only option) then I would like to improve my prospects by possibly taking the CELTA course at Izmir Ekonomi or International House at some point in the future.

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