Jump to content

Should I Just Come to Turkey and Then Find a Job?

Rate this topic


Recommended Posts

I recently found this site as I was searching for jobs. I like the tone a lot more than Dave's ESL!

Currently, I'm in Korea teaching English. After a rough year, I've decided to leave the country and search for other work. Having lived on the border of Turkey (Batumi, Georgia) and visiting the country once, I've decided that I would love to try my hand at teaching in Istanbul.

Something I've noticed, however, is that there aren't as many jobs postings as in Korea. I hear private (or public) highschools and universities are great jobs to get, but there are few postings on the usual websites.

Should I just come to Turkey and search then? I would be arriving mid July... would that be too late to get a job?

I've heard Istanbul is very expensive. What I'm wondering is if I were to live outside the touristy/hip neighborhoods would I be able to find better accommodation or a better job.

From all my discussions, it seems I might have to be on the ground to land a job in Istanbul and Turkey in general. Do I have a chance to get something decent?

Many thanks for any responses. I know I've asked a lot of questions. Posted Image

~Karyn
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Many universities will still be recruiting in July, but the best jobs will have gone by then.

It is best to look at the websites of the universities. Universities start recruiting for their prep schools around now. You can try looking at university websites or send your cv and a covering letter to the university human resources department or direct to the school of foreign languages.

If you haven't found anything you like by july, then come and try face to face by all means.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Silvana as Fil said there are many foreigners working in Turkey. If you have a Kimlic (Turkish Citizenship) it obviously makes life easier to work but providing you have a work permit there is no problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

slightly of topic sorry but I have a question, if Kimlic translates to turkish citizenship, what is a Kimlic number then and why do I have it with just getting my residency?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whilst it's true foreigners who get a Residents Permit are given a kimlik number, foreigners numbers start with 99 which sets us apart form Turks and we are not given an identity card like the Turks confirming we are TC.  But we do need a kimlik number to be on the system as it identifies us for when we use the doctors or go to the hospitals for treatment if we have SSK.  Also if you want a museum card you will need it or dealing with the authorities in general.

I've been asked several time for my number, once in the tax office when I wanted to pay tax for my driving license as they didn't want  my tax number and also when I have renewed my RP.

Sorry I haven't explained it very well, maybe someone else can explain it better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think Abi has explained it well. A kimlik number is just a unique ID number which identifies Turkish citizens and residents. Residents' numbers start with 99 to show that they are not Turkish citizens. Kimlik numbers, whether foreign residents ones or not, are used extensively. For example, if you want to buy a domain-name for your website from a Turkish company you will have to enter your kimlik number. Most Turkish online systems will accept kimlik numbers beginning with 99, some (like some e-belediye applications) have not yet been upgraded and balk at the 99.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thank you Abi and Vic that helps a lot Posted Image

just one more thing, if the Kimlik number is basically your ID number, what is this then:

" All residents in Turkey are issued with a Turkish Identification Number (TIN), which is also their social security number (Sosyal Güvenlik Numarası - SGN)"

do you get this only after registering for health insurance?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can't register for SSK unless you have a Kimlik number, so I would think that the TIN is the same number as the your kimlik number. If I got it wrong I hope someone will correct me. The kimlik number is assigned to you after your RP papers have been processed and can sometimes take several weeks.

Have you been told what your kimlik number is Mouse? I was given it by the yabanci police when the system came into place. If you haven't got it there is a website where you can find out what it is. Here is the link to the thread which was telling you how to do it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you Abi, yes I got my Kimlic number, actually got it over the internet as it wasn`t ready at the time I was over for my Residency. I needed it to import my stuff and the Dog :)

I was just wondering if it was different from the TIN I read about

Link to comment
Share on other sites

KarynDietrich - back on topic... You could come on a 3 month tourist visa and look around and actively seek employment. Legitimate schools at that time of year will gladly help you with work permits. Any school that does not should be viewed with suspicion although there are some who put the burden on the teacher. I only ran into that once.

I got my first job while visiting Istanbul in July of 2000 while visiting on a tourist visa. I was visiting my future wife for the first time and my first time in Turkey. WITH her help, I was able to scour the newspapers for job ads (most of those for teachers were in English even in Turkish papers). I sent out a lot of CV's/resumes via FAX and email (you do not say where you are from originally and they are different to me but the same to others) and toward the end of the month I started to get so many job offers that I literally could pick and choose. That was more because those schools were having difficulty filling last minute positions to start in September than because of my qualifications I must say. Posted Image

NOW it is 2013, I have been away from Istanbul and retired for nearly 4 years and a lot may have changed. The legitimate schools will be looking for TEFL/TOESL certificates, Masters's Degrees preferred, teaching experience a highly desired, etc. Teaching at an elementary or high school has VERY different requirements than teaching at a university. Their governing bodies are different. HS and elementary used to require an equivalent teaching certificate from your home country and usually a few years experience with references. The competition among the really good schools is fierce. I have worked at both and much preferred the university level. The dress codes are strict at HS/elementary and usually very relaxed at the university level.

Do a Google search for Istanbul schools and Universities, go to their web sites and see if they have vacancies.

Good luck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you so much, Hobbit! I'm confident I can find *a* job....but I want a good one! I have a year and a half experience, bachelors, and 200 hour TEFL. That puts me in a sort of good position, but I know many people have much more experience than me! I guess it's going to be a risk, no matter how you look at it!

Thanks for your advice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, I do have one more question in reference to working at a primary school versus a university... Is it possible with my qualifications to even get a job at a University? I know here in Korea you must have a bachelors or 4 years experience.

Thanks again, everyone! I appreciate your responses!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, I do have one more question in reference to working at a primary school versus a university... Is it possible with my qualifications to even get a job at a University? I know here in Korea you must have a bachelors or 4 years experience.

Without a Master's degree, it could be difficult. However, in some English Language Programs, they may accept only a BA and TEFL.

I do not want to sound negative, you should know however, that Istanbul is a magnet for young, highly educated and confident people with English teaching credentials. You will have a lot of competition...

You might write the lady on this page: http://elp.bilgi.edu.tr/en/

Didem Mutçalıoğlu - Language Programs Director

I do not know her, they had another director when I was there.

Here is a page of their staff: http://elp.bilgi.edu.tr/en/elp2-academic-staff/?elp2

It seems several of them have only BA/BS.

Bilgi University has a very large English Prep Program.

Here are the qualifications for Koç University. http://elc.ku.edu.tr/jobs

Quite stringent but it does not mean they will NOT hire you.

Robert College is THE 4 year HS in the country. I was there for 2 years, they did hire an occasional new teacher. Here are their requirements:

http://portal.robcol.k12.tr/Default.aspx?pgID=259

Alas, no openings but it would not hurt to send them a CV anyway.

Üsküdar American Academy is also a top-level HS: http://www.uaa.k12.tr/icerik.asp?id=711&dil=en

As is Koç Lise: http://www.kocschool.k12.tr/en/home/institutional/Jobopportunities/RecruitingAndSelection.aspx

Now you know as much if not more than I do about qualifications for teaching as each of the above pages note them in some detail.

If you were to find work at any of the above, you should consider yourself lucky. Posted Image

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In 10 years everything may have changed, as I look back over the last 10 years I cannot but marvel at the changes in Turkey. ADSL in nearly every village in the country, hi-speed broadband in the cities, street lights even in our tiny village of Çukurbağ, (relatively) clean streets and lush, flower-filled gardens in Istanbul, a never-ending expansion of the Metro and express buses in Istanbul, several new private schools started, the economy improving, the "new" Turkish Lira (YTL) being replaced by the "newer" Turkish Lira and without 6 zeros!! Posted Image A relatively stable economy, especially compared to the "other" Mediterranean countries in Europe, a much-vaunted (and criticized) health care system for both Turkish and foreign residents, and much more. If I die at my estimated life-expectancy, I will be dead in 10 years! Posted Image

I must admire your foresight, tho it may be a bit far-foresighted. Posted Image

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hobbit- that's a great post. I'm going to check out those links. I plan to teach English in Turkey, but not for about ten years, but I want to make my homework now and get all my ducks in a row.

Hmm, planning ahead? Definitely not the Turkish way of doing things!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tell me about it, Vic. That's my one pet peeve. That, and pink promises.

@Hobit- Yes, I'm a planner and maybe too much on this one. But my school is paying 90% for training in my field so I want to tap that as much as possilbe before they take the benefit away. I've a BSED in English and did all my coursework for a masters in Admin, but I didn't get the certificate because in my district, if you have it, they push you into it and it's not been my goal to be a principal.

I thought perhaps getting a masters in writing and criticism would be nice. Then, I considered ESL/ELL. But if all I need to do is take a TEFL/TESL test, I could do that tomorrow. I looked online at practice tests, and they seem really easy! Is it pass/fail, or do you try to get a high score?

I plan because a masters could take 5 years if I only do one course a semester. Who knows- maybe I should just see if I CAN get my admin degree just to I can go onto my doctorate. Here in the States, they want that to teach in college.

Is there any such thing as being OVER qualified in Turkey?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Hobit- Yes, I'm a planner and maybe too much on this one. I've a BSED in English and did all my coursework for a masters in Admin, but I didn't get the certificate.

But if all I need to do is take a TEFL/TESL test, I could do that tomorrow. I looked online at practice tests, and they seem really easy!

Is it pass/fail, or do you try to get a high score?

Here in the States, they want that to teach in college.

Is there any such thing as being OVER qualified in Turkey?

Your transcripts will show the coursework you did for your Master's. Make a copy AND copy the detailed course descriptions for the coursework you passed. When you come here, you will probably need to have it officially translated. In MANY cases, university hires have a BA/BS or MA/MS. Career track faculty have PhD's and go through all the same bureaucratic hoops as in the US and especially "publish or perish."

I did not teach English, I taught academic skills at English speaking schools. Those who want to teach English almost always need the requisite TOEFL/TESL, + experience, etc. Most universities (and high schools) where English is the teaching language, have a preparatory year for English where the student comes in knowing little or no English. That is where the English teachers shined and where I refused to go.

Do not worry about being OVER-qualified in the Turkish academic world. Regardless of your qualifications, at first, you will go where they want you to go and they will pay you a first year teacher salary. If you apply and and are accepted for a tenure track position you will need aforesaid PhD and will be in a very different category.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All foreigners who got an "ikamet" (residency), the little green book get issued an ID number. It starts with "9", is different than the Turkish citizens ID numbers. The number is automatically and randomly generated by the system, the moment your ikamet is given. You may not get it, you may not be aware of it, but the number is generated. It would be in the data systems. You can get it from internet from:

https://tckimlik.nvi.gov.tr/YabanciKimlikNo/DogumYiliveIkametTezkereNoSorguModul.aspx

You have to enter your birth year and the number on your ikamet book.

This is not a citizenship number. It is generated to make things easier, to follow you where you are, with your insurances, banks. Same thing as Turkish citizens ID number (Kimlik number).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...