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Excellent Turkish-Learning Websites

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Excellent and Good Turkish Websites to learn Turkish

 

There are several excellent and very good websites to learn Turkish.  My favourites are as follows:

 

www.turkishteatime.com EXCELLENT WEBSITE

www.turkishbasics.comwww.turkishfree.webs.comwww.onlineturkish.comwww.princeton.edu/~turkish/reading1.htmlwww.turkishlanguage.co.uk   EXCELLENT WEBSITEwww.ielanguages.comwww.worldstories.org.uk  (click on TURKISH)www.turkishclass.comwww.totally-turkish.com 

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Thanks for those Jade. You'll have us all speaking Turkish on here before long! Posted Image
 
I learnt this!
 
Tencere yuvarlanmış kapağını bulmuş!
It's nothing to do with finding lids of saucepans, it means, 'They're perfect for each other'. Posted Image
 
I can't get my head around some of the saying in Turkish, can you, JP or you Leyla explain?

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But JP, that's not what the words say. What is the exact translation?

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Thanks, I thought it was something like that. Strange! How on earth can that be translated into 'They're perfect for each other' I don't know. :D

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Birds of a feather flock together means people who are similar come together, like I suppose English people meet up together in Turkey and Turkish people in other countries like to live in the same area.

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Hi folks! I hope you are doing well!

Sometimes I drop in and take a look around..

Let me add a note about this idiom: Turkish people use this idiom in particular in a criticizing way: Not when two nice features match, but when the features subject to criticism are concerned. If you say , let's say, to a newly married couple 'tencere yuvarlanmış, kapağını bulmuş' this will directly humiliate the couple!Posted Image

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Hi Saffron, nice to hear from you again. As you say, I have always heard that in a negative sense. Not always necessarily about couples but keeping bad company. In the same way that "birds of a feather flock together" has a darker side to it. As in, if you hang out with people who drink and gamble and womanise you are probably like that yourself. Usually said with a loud disapproving sniff.

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Thanks Saffron. I'd never heard that expression before until I came across it on that first link that Jade put in. The point I was making was that there is no way that you can get the sense of what it means from the literal translation. The saucepan rolled away and found its lid.Posted Image

 

 

Nice to 'see' you Saffron. Posted Image

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Welcome back Saffron -- I see you have called in for a glass of tea !

That's an interesting idiom, and useful to know it's only used in disdain, (otherwise we might have opened our mouth & put our foot in it ! (By the way, is there a Turkish idiom for that?) Posted Image

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Hi Meral, yes!Posted Image

I cannot remember any Turkish idiom that would exactly mean the same..

But there is something similar, let me write it down on this occassion : 'Balıklama atlamak/ balıklama dalmak'

'Balıklama' is a diving term. Balıklama dalmak/atlamak is to dive headfirst. This idiomatic expression is used if somebody gets involved in a project, idea, action readily and without giving due care to the possible outcomes..

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  • 10 months later...
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It sounds like the one my father-in-law said, you hang around thieves, you are going to be a thief. It was about my husband smoking and how all his friends smoke. Turkish expression are interesting to say the least, lol. I took two Turkish courses, my teacher taught some Turkish expressions. "I am so hungry, my stomach is ringing" (Çok açım karnım zil çalıyoror). There is another one, it is often used with someone you are upset with and ready to slap them, "Your five friends are coming." I can't remember the exact Turkish translation.

My husband was driving on the highway. He got mad at the guy in front of him, he said something like this in Turkish you are driving like you are in the fields. If you want to insult some driving you ask them did you get your driver licence from the butcher?!

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