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Vic801

So What's Your Breakfast?

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I LOVE Chinese food. But I have probably never really experienced it because I have never been in China. Anyway, here in Turkey, if I don't go out, it's cereal, with sliced bananas on top and milk. Rather boring. But if I go out for a Turkish breakfast, sometimes it looks like this!

post-74-0-84401400-1365684710_thumb.jpg

But what I really like, sometimes, is the English breakfast. Eggs, bacon, sausage, baked beans, fried mushrooms, and HP sauce. Mostly everything you shouldn't eat. I have never had such a breakfast until I came to Turkey. In America, we can only compete with our "steak and eggs" breakfast. But I think the Brits did it best. Now I have a reason to go out and get a proper English breakfast, and take a photo of it.

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I'm afraid you can't get good, proper sausages here. I always bring some back from the UK with me, but they don't last long. :D

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I LOVE Chinese food. But I have probably never really experienced it because I have never been in China. Anyway, here in Turkey, if I don't go out, it's cereal, with sliced bananas on top and milk. Rather boring. But if I go out for a Turkish breakfast, sometimes it looks like this!

Posted Imageturkish_breakfast.jpg

But what I really like, sometimes, is the English breakfast. Eggs, bacon, sausage, baked beans, fried mushrooms, and HP sauce. Mostly everything you shouldn't eat. I have never had such a breakfast until I came to Turkey. In America, we can only compete with our "steak and eggs" breakfast. But I think the Brits did it best. Now I have a reason to go out and get a proper English breakfast, and take a photo of it.

This Turkish breakfast looks like a real feast!!Posted Image

I like bacon and sausages too!!

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Just browsed through this topic and I'll have to say I'm really hungry now. Thanks everyone for posting. Breakfast for me lately has been a shake or fruit but my favorite thing for breakfast would be fried eggs with bacon and a piece of toast or American Pancakes :-). The Turkish style breakfast looks really good :) can't wait.

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Ken, American breakfasts are good too. When I was working in West Virginia I used to go for breakfast at the diner (which I thought funny, dining for breakfast) and apart from the amazing range of foods, it was my opportunity to try grits. I had read so many books where they were eating grits for breakfast that I thought it sounded quite exotic. I was a little disappointed, but at least I have now eaten grits (and blueberry muffins).

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Conan, I'll admit ignorance in the Chinese breakfast area. How do the noodles/dumplings differ from breakfast to dinner?

We have tons of China King Buffets here and if I don't get my fix of hot and sour soup at least twice a month, I have withdrawl! Also a sucker for Peking duck and mushu anything. I could do shots of hosin, plum and black bean sauces.

I'm also a big fan of breakfast rice blends with dried fruits. It has black rice in it, so when you cook it, it turns a pretty purple! Hard to get here, though. The Asian grocery only carries it once in a while.

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Conan, I'll admit ignorance in the Chinese breakfast area. How do the noodles/dumplings differ from breakfast to dinner?

We have tons of China King Buffets here and if I don't get my fix of hot and sour soup at least twice a month, I have withdrawl! Also a sucker for Peking duck and mushu anything. I could do shots of hosin, plum and black bean sauces.

I'm also a big fan of breakfast rice blends with dried fruits. It has black rice in it, so when you cook it, it turns a pretty purple! Hard to get here, though. The Asian grocery only carries it once in a while.

LOL. Tater, I totally understand your confusion because Chinese are having arguments among themselves about the same question.Posted Image

Actually there are not specific rules telling us what type of dumplings/noodles are for breakfast while other types are for dinner. Basically, they are all dumplings/noodles. Whether we "should" have dumplings/noodles for breakfast is simply a matter of personal habit and geographical location.

In general, people in the southern part of China prefer noodles/dumplings only for breakfast. They have rice for dinner. Any food made from flour is considered to be somewhat "informal" for dinner!!Posted Image (So southerner sometimes laugh at northerners for eating dumplings for Spring Festival: "What?? They are having DUMPLINGS for Spring Festival??This is THE Spring Festival!!")

People in the northern part of China, however, tend to have noodles and dumplings for almost every occasion: breakfast, lunch, dinner. Many friends from northern part of China told me that if they have rice, they start to feel starving real soon. Food made from flour such as steamed buns and steamed stuff buns are their staple food.

This is just a general situation. Things change from one province to another, one county to another, and even one town to another.Posted Image

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I really don't like Turkish breakfast, I'm actually pretty fussy and don't like white cheese, olives, yoghurt and i cant stand eating tomato or cucumber either.

I usually go for musili and activia yoghurt or French toast :D I do however love Turkish patisserie or borek but seeing as im on a diet and seeing a dietician there is no chance of eating any of that any time soon!

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Alright Vic, you mentioned 'grits' and I've always imagined that they were some sort of fried thing but the video says that they are boiled. Just what are grits?

Hi Swabs, nice to see you again. I'm not a lover of white cheese. It's usually too salty for my taste and it's not so good for cooking either. I usually use Kasar or Tulum but only after trying them to see if they're tasty and not too salty.

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Grits can be fried, when cooked they look like has brown potatoes. they can also be made into pancakes.

Grits are derived from hominy. Hominy is dried corn kernels with the hull and germ removed. When the dried hominy is ground, it turns into grits. Hominy is one of the first foods that American Indians gave to the colonists I think hominy was the native American Indian word for maize.

I also like cream of wheat for breakfast.Posted Image

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Polenta???????

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Yeah- polenta is big in South America and made its way to Europe after explorers brought back corn to Europe. It's even in Turkey. I found this on Wiki:

In Turkey, kuymak or muhlama is common, especially in the Black Sea Region. While kuymak/muhlama is made with cornmeal, cheese and butter, a coarse, almost bulgur size version of broken (or ground) dried maize is used to prepare "çakıldak", a kind of dolma or sarma made with kale leaves, especially in the central-eastern Black Sea Region provinces of Samsun, Ordu and around.

It's a really popular side dish here in the States in more upscale restaurants. It's blandness lends itself very well to fusion cooking, incorporating many different spices. It can even go from savory to sweet. You can buy it pre-made in tubes and slice it down for frying or you can make it from scratch and layer it in a ramekin with other filling, bake it and flip it over onto the plate for a nice presentation. I think it goes great with basil.

Funny story: my grandfather was an Iowa farm boy and after he moved to PA and married my grandmother, he got homesick for what they call "mush." (Midwestern term for polenta) You're only supposed to use a few spoons of it for a pot, as it really swells. Well, my grandmother didn't know how to make it, so she tried cooking it like rice- one part corn to two parts water. She kept having to add more water and moving it out of the pot so by the end of the evening, she had pots of mush all over the kitchen floor! Posted Image

Conan, thanks for the explanation! I always thought that one of the best ways to learn about a culture is through food! You can figure out climate, geography, religion, economics and even who conquered whom by looking at what's on a country's plate! Yet that's one thing that unifies us all. That's why I like the idea of fusion. I find it interesting that almost all countries have their own version of a some round, flat, starchy thing... That's the type of stuff I think about when I get lost in my own head, lol!

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Thanks for the explanation TT. I asked Mr Sunny about it but although he's heard of it he's never tried it as he says he's never been to the Black Sea.

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Grits for the mill, Sunny! Cowboys and trappers were always eating them in the American adventure books I read as a child and I thought they would be quite exciting, like eating gravel or something. But the bright blue blueberry muffins at breakfast were quite something to behold and made up for the grits disappointment.

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You're right, I did read about them and assumed they were some sort of pancake but didn't put much thought into it. As you say disappointing.

Now, muffins with fresh cream, that's another story although for breakfast I really prefer savouries, with the exception of jam (apricot or cherry).

I remember the first time I came to Turkey on holiday and made a pig of myself at breakfast with the lovely fresh bread, butter and apricot jam. Posted Image

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It is funny how on holiday you change your eating habits. I never eat jam or sweet things at breakfast but on holiday at a hotel I do! (and apricot jam is my favourite!) My French friends shuddered at the thought of eating anything savoury in the morning but came back from holidays in England and sheepishly told how they had loved having a full English breakfast.

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When I was home in February, there is a great cafe near my Mum's house in Kings Heath, Birmingham.

I was ordering my breakfastfrom the lady and she finished and left, brushing my knife onto the floor in the process. First thing she said (muttered) was 'aaah siktir!' and picked my knife up. As soon as I heard it, I went back into Turkish language mode and said 'Efendim?' Bearing in mind this is Birmingham...

She was so shocked and embarrassed that I understood her because not many people speak/understand Turkish in my neck of the woods, she apologised profusely to me and we struck up a really nice conversation. She then proceeded to ply me with mugs of milky tea as a ploughed through a Full English for the first time in what had been a year.

Next day I took her and her husband (cafe owner) a box of lokum. They accepted it as if I had just handed them a bar of gold.

So that is my breakfast/Birmingham/Turkswhereyoudontexpectthem/free tea, story.

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Now, surprisingly enough, TT, I did get to taste Grape Nuts when I was staying in the Shenandoah Valley region, and I survived to tell the tale, although jungle rations are not really my thing for breakfast, and I wouldn't inflict them on my microwave (if I had one).

I loved the adverts though, "fills you up, not out" !!!!

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Vic it seems your breakfast experience in the USA was very different to mine, I certainly did not considered the food disappointing or " jungle rations" . Grape nuts actually come in " flakes" which are nicer.

By the way the word "diner" has nothing to do with the dining as in dinner but was taken from the name of the prefabricated buildings that came into fashion in the late 1900's in the USA selling meals. Rather like the word "biro" became the general word for a ball point pen.

Grits under different names such as sadza, miele meal , masa , polenta is the staple diet of millions of people around the world. Not just the cowboys breakfast.Posted Image

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One of the things we tend to forget about the US is that it is such a huge country with such diversity between States and even inter-State. My experience of my first visit to Virginia was completely different to my stay in Boston, for example, in lots of ways and not just the food. Unfortunately I didn't get as much free-time as I would have liked to discover more, I did want to go to one of those "crabs-legs, all you can eat" places, but time was limited.

Interesting to learn about diners, though. And I love polenta and made it often when I was in the south of France and it was easy to find. I even had the special spoon for stirring it!

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Yeah, my country is pretty huge so there's a huge difference from state to state. It's difficult to say what's classic "American" fare anymore since we've changed so much over the past 50 years. Even the concept of "American" can even be viewed as racist, since a lot of the 1900s version of "American" is just White Europpean.

That said, I still think certain things are universal to the USA experince, but then as soon as I try to claim it, it seems like it's just a mash-up from another country.

Sadly, I guess the only thing that originated in the good ole U S of A is fast food chains. Sorry for that.

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A lot of the ideas I had about the US were from fiction, whether books or films, and it sounds silly, but it was really bewildering to find that real people did the same things, it was a bit like walking in onto a film set. I mean, there were yellow school buses like Forrest Gump, and people sitting out on their porch like To Kill a Mocking Bird and the Sheriff really did have a star pinned to his waistcoat like all the John Wayne films. People came to the office in stetsuns and with rifles hung on the back of their pickup trucks, the smell of popcorn wafted through the office all day as people drifted in and out of the kitchen making bucket-fulls of popcorn and we went out one evening to eat ribs which were really good (but huge portions).

And to get back to the topic (before I get my knuckles rapped) the Holiday Inn served frighteningly-blue blueberry muffins for breakfast but the diner next door was really good and came with its own Roseanne look-alike who served topped up your coffee mug every 10 seconds. Boston was really tame after that and breakfasts were really just like full English breakfast.

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