Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
MercerMersin

Residence Visa Or Apply For Turkish Passport?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

My husband and I are moving to Mersin next year with our 10 year old daughter. We were married in Australia and my daughter was born in Australia. What would be the best thing for us? Should we obtain a residence permit knowing it needs to be renewed each year or do we apply for Turkish citizenship and / or passport?Any help would be appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi MererMersin and welcome to our forum. Although you didn't say I would think your husband is a Turk. Is your husband the father of your daughter? If he is he just needs to apply to the nearest Turkish Consulate for a Kimlik for her.

If you have been married to your Turkish husband for over 3 years you can apply for Turkish Citizenship in Australia. I'm not sure how long it will take to get there so you should ask him to make enquires. If you apply for it here it can up to 18 months if you are unlucky. You will be interviewed and the interview will be in Turkish.

It would be a good idea if your husband asks the Turkish Consulate that if you get Turkish Citizenship first whether you could apply for a Kimlik for your daughter at that stage or if she will have to wait until she is 18.

If your husband isn't the father of your daughter, before you leave Australia you will need a court order if the father is named on the Birth Certificate to say you have the right to remove your daughter from Australia. If he isn't named I don't know the answer and again it is something your husband needs to ask the Turkish Consulate. It is important that this matter is sorted out before you leave Australia because she won't get a Resident's Permit without that document. This will result in another problem as when she arrives in Turkey she will take a Tourist Visa which is only good for 90 days within 180. The problem will be that she can live here for 90 days and because the Tourist Visa is valid for 180 and can't be renewed she would have to leave Turkey for 90 days and come back on day 181.

If you or your daughter don't have Turkish Citizenship before you arrive in Turkey to live permanently it's not a problem. When you arrive in Turkey just get a Tourist visa in the normal way and with 30 days apply for your Resident's Permit.

I apologise for the lengthy reply but had to cover all angles due to not knowing more details about your daughter.

If you have any more questions please ask or if I haven't explained properly. Posted Image

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife is Turkish and my daughter was born in Los Angeles; we went to the Turkish consulate in LA to get her birth certificate translated to Turkish and sent to Ankara, and I think there was only one other simple form to fill out. That was all it took to give her dual citizenship.Getting my residency here was a bit of a hassle; from what I hear it's a different process depending on whether the foreign spouse of a Turkish citizen is the husband or wife, but not sure. We had to go to a govt translator and notary to get the marriage certificate translated and notarized (you can't go to just any translator or notary apparently) and it cost, if i remember correctly, about 100TL for the translation (and my wife had to help the translator do the translation!) and another 100TL or so for the notarization, give or take a few kuruş. Then we took that to the police station in Aksaray (Istanbul) for the residency process (pack a lunch). It was all done in a day because my father in law has a guy working for his company who deals with immigration for their employees, so he prepared the paperwork for us and let us know what we would need, so that part was easy for us. A week later I went and picked up my "mavi kart" and that was it (three weeks after that they reduced the residency fee by almost 90% -- bad timing on my part!). Main thing is to find out beforehand exactly what's required and make sure you have everything in order before you start the process, it will make it a lot easier with a lot less headache.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got onto the turkish embassy in Sydney and it turns out that it is really easy for us to get a Turkish passport for both myself and my daughter and an identity card. Also sorted out the denklik belgesi (!) and even bringing my dog over! I thought it was going to be a nightmare!Yes my hubby is turkish (Mersin born and bred). Im quite overwhelmed by the idea of moving over there but we dont really have any family here in Australia so returning to family there is great for my daughter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You do know that if you use a Turkish passport rather than your Australian one that every time you leave Turkey you have to go to a bank and deposit, I think it's 50 0r 60 tl and show the receipt when you leave the country. You can have Turkish citizenship without using a Turkish passport if you have dual nationality then you don't pay the leaving tax if you use your Oz passport.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi MercerMersin, welcome to the forum. Turkish passports are generally quite expensive, and you shouldn't really need one. If you have Turkish citizenship, you will get a kimlik (identity card) and can travel freely in & out of Turkey with that plus your Aussie passport. We've done it many times.

I too, was overwhelmed at the thought of moving here from AU, as it's a huge step, but that was almost 9 years ago and I've never looked back ! And many others have done the same. All of us on this forum are here to help if you need it, so just feel free to ask! Good luck with the move ! Posted Image

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Meral, can I ask do you have children and if so how did they cope with the language change? Im looking at putting my daughter into a private school (she is 10) and its about $13K aus a year! Is that normal? Or should I go the cheaper option of still private but not american.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jane, our daughter was 13 when we came here, with very basic Turkish just learned from her Dad. We also considered putting her into a private school with English as the medium of instruction. The one we looked at (recommended by a Turkish teacher of English) wasn't that impressive, and we found out that instruction in English was only 6 hours weekly, with other classes being taught in Turkish. We thought it wasn't worth the high fees, plus she also needed to learn Turkish.

So we enrolled her in a Turkish state school, in Year 8 = the last year of "middle school" here. She was a bit peeved as, it being September, she had almost finished year 8 in AU. However. it was all for the best as she had to pick up a whole heap of Turkish as well, and then sit for the high school entrance exam at the end of that year. We enrolled her in a dershane and engaged private tutors for maths & science, as the exam was testing the previous 3 years' work. With persistence, she got into the local Anadolu Lisesi, skipping the prep year after passing an English test (thus catching up with her peers back home, hehe). Note, the system was changed the following year so that this is no longer possible. She graduated in 2007 at age 17. In September she embarks on her final year of a doctorate degree in the UK.

How does your daughter feel about the move ? If she's excited and positive about the adventure, perhaps a Turkish school would suit her, as I believe there's no better way for her to pick up the language fast -- kids seem to lose this natural ability by early teenage years.

Whatever you decide, best of luck ! Posted Image

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our daughters were 9 and 5 when we moved to Ankara from Hungary, that was 10 years ago. The big one went in at the end of the 3rd year and the little one did a year at nursery school. Their Turkish was reasonably good before coming. They have been through state schools in Turkey. The schools have not been terribly good, but they have not been bad either, and I think our daughters have gained a lot from the experience overall.We arrived in Ankara in March and our daughter went straight in to the local primary school in yenimahalle. It was not the best of areas, the children were a bit wild, that didn't seem to bother our daughter but her teacher, who was very good, told us she thought she would be better off in a different school.We considered private school at that time, but we were not happy with the curriculum on offer. We did not like the idea that our daughter would spend 12 lessons a week in English lessons, when she already knew English, so we looked at the French medium school. We went for a visit, as we entered the school a bag flew out of a second floor window and landed on the floor in front of us. When we got inside the staff were unwelcoming and did not say anything about the school that made us want to send our daughter there. Shortly afterwards we met parents of a former pupil at the school who confirmed our impressions. We the made further enquiries about the English medium private schools. I was visiting quite a few of them as part of my job at the time. They looked very nice. The English teachers were nice people. But none of them filled me with any great desire to send our daughter there. Most of the colleagues at work sent their children to private schools, but none of them had much good to say about their children's schools, apart from those who were only in Turkey for a short time and sending their children to international schools (they make the Turkish private schools look cheap). The private schools are extremely eam oriented and the children don't have much fun there. People say the discipline is very bad in the private schools, but I don't have any first hand experience of that.So we decided to look around for a better state school. Most of the good schools in Ankara seem to be in the Bahçelievler- Emek districts. We enrolled our daughter at one. On the first day there were 55 children in the class and our daughter was sitting at the back under a sloping ceiling that nearly touched her head. We looked for another school immediately, went to another one nearby, the head was very good (sadly he left that termm) so we enrolled her there and she attended there happily for the next two years, the end of the 5th year, when we moved to Antalya.At the first school in Antalya, the one nearest our house, the children in year 6 managed to break the classroom door and neither daughter seemed to learn much that year, so we moved them to the second closest school. That turned out to be satisfactory, and both daughters completed their primary education there to the end of year 8. We are happy with what they learned there and how they were treated.Then came high school. I am still trying to work out what high school does in the education system, not much as far as I can see, as dersane gets them ready for the university exams. Nevertheless, our children have emerged with excellent Turkish speaking, reading and writing skills. We have worked hard to make sure their English is also well developed. They read avidly in both languages. They have a choice between UK and Turkey for higher education and employment, which I think is a great advantage. Both our daughters are reasonably normal, apart from being complete lunatics, but that is probably down to their parents.All in all, our experience is that it is possible to get a reasonable education from state shools, but as parents we have had to work at it. Personally I don't think private schools give value for money, and I don't regret not having used them. However, I would recommend anyone to make their own mind up, look at all the options, go to the private schools, check them out, speak to as many people as possible, be prepared to change course if you think there are better options.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both our daughters are reasonably normal, apart from being complete lunatics, but that is probably down to their parents.

I think that comes down to their parents being immigants/foreigners/expats but it it is something for which the children will thank their parents in years to come.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much guys. I wasnt looking forward to paying $13K - seems insane when I can send her to the top schools in Sydney for $10K! I am so glad to have found this website - was concerned about my daughter learning the language. I laughed Meral at your daughter being annoyed about being behind. That was the first think that Alyssa! But she is so excited about living in Mersin - there is not much in the way of family in Australia (only my brother who is sometimes wanting for friendship and personality. In Mersin she will have 13 family members right next door! We are currently building a 3 story duplex, bottom for my husband's sister to move from Adana with her 2 kids and middle for my brother in law - we get the top as I wanted the roof for a roof top garden for my dog. Yes I am a bit silly. My brother in law thinks its hilarious that I want to bring my dog over.I think we are not going to worry too much about the turkish passports too - just get the identity card. Its a lot cheaper too!! I am pumped to start this move - bring on 2013!!!Unrelated topic - how do I put a photo up instead of my attractive black background male physique?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am getting married next summer to a wonderful Turkish man. My daughter (from a previous marriage) and I would be moving to Mersin Turkey following the wedding and receipt of the court approved paperwork for removing my daughter from the States. I am interested in hearing what people have found regarding schools in Mersin Turkey specifically. And I would like to hear and advice people may have to offer.Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi AliBecca and welcome to our forum. I understand that there aren't many foreigners living in Mersin so not sure how many replies you will get. We do have a member called Yellowcatt who is very helpful and lives there. Hopefully he will read your post and be able to give you some answers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi AliBecca and welcome to the forum.Have you been to Turkey before? If not I think it would be a good idea to do so before taking the plunge, especially as you have a child to consider as it is very different from the States and Mersin is not as cosmopolitan as the western coast, Izmir, Istanbul and Ankara.I don't know the schools in Mersin but as everyone says the Education system leaves a lot to be desired in the whole of the country. I think you should put your toe in the water before taking such a big step.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Everyone

My name is Sawsan . I am Syrian married to a Turkish Man . I live in Kuwait . In Feb, 2015 we will be three years married and I will soon be applying for the passport. But my question is about the interview !! what level of language do they need? and if any one has gone through that , what kind of questions do they ask?? I have a son who is a year and half , he took the passport automatically after birth.. Will be more than happy if any one help me out with an answer.

 

Regards and many thanks

 

Sawsan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Feb, 2015 we will be three years married and I will soon be applying for the passport. But my question is about the interview !! what level of language do they need?

I imagine you mean you will be applying for citizenship (vatandaşlık) since that is required before you apply for a passport. I only know from the point of view of an English person applying for citizenship, there is Turkish test, a  low intermediate level of Turkish is required.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  


×
×
  • Create New...