Jump to content

Newbie- Moving To Turkiye's Coast Soon

Rate this topic


Recommended Posts

Hello Everyone,I'm a Canadian female tired of frigid winters and looking forward to live near the Sea. Retired early to enjoy simple living. Planning a trip in which I stay a few weeks in each of 4-5 pre-selected towns along the Coast, in order to find where exactly I'll want to reside.

My expectations are to find here folks living there, who might inform me where to find other expats geographically (where they meet) and help me prepare for this adventure solo.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Beachologist (great username) welcome to Turkey Central. Your expectations will be fulfilled here, we'll tell you where to find expats (and where to avoid them) and anything else you want to know, just ask.

Make sure Kaş is on your list of places.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Beachologist and welcome to our forum. Your idea of staying several places to get an feeling of where you want to live is sound. We have said many times, whilst a place may seem ideal you do need to spend a year there to see all the seasons and that's why everyone should rent rather than buy in the first instance.

I will you luck and look forward to reading more posts from you. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good morning over there,I reside in Antalya - well, on the outskirts of Antalya, and it is really an ideal place to live. Before moving here I also lived in Istanbul and then in Cesme and Fethiye.

Why I prefer Antalya? Unlike the small coastal resorts, here you've got concerts, theatre, music festivals, cinema all year round - an excellent social network. There are a few different expat groups here too so you've got plenty of opportunities to meet other foreigners and Turks who belong to the clubs.

The city is very interesting and there are lots of places to visit on day trips along the coast and inland. The whole coastline is beautiful.

Looking forward to hearing from you,Jade

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there, I moved from the UK for the same reasons as you.

I'm in Antalya, in Konyaalti right next to the beach and its really great. In addition to having beach and mountains, you've got a good choice of some really lovely places to visit from here - Lara, Kemer, Perge, Side and Belek can all be reached within a couple of hours. In Antalya there's everything, tennis centres, health and fitness centres, the amazing Ataturk Park, cinema's, shopping, etc, etc. Antalya also has more blue flag beaches than any other region of Turkey. We found that to feel homey you will need to learn Turkish, that's our only struggle at the moment but no regrets about coming here.

Send me a message if you need a short-term place to rent in Turkey as I do have some connections and may be able to help.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for the Warm Welcome.

It elevates my enthusiasm on this adventure (cross an ocean and a continent to settle down in a Muslim country, as an atheist woman solo).

I can anticipate having trillions of questions once I land in beautiful Turkiye. At this point, though, my focus is on the interconnection between place and language (one a linguistic barrier, the other Anglophones).

Briefly, I'll settle where I can find a few Anglos to befriend and with whom I can break my linguistic isolation after a few days contemplating the blue sea.

Margo and Jade, you mention a social network in Antalya. How does one find it, informally or are there cafes or libraries or even organized meetings? Please be as specific as possible.

I'll definitely start my journey in Antalya. (explore the surroundings, affordability of residing near the waves, etc)But what I'd like to establish now is where I'll go to meet expats residing there?

Jade's remarks resonate (I too am an urban soul, love concerts, the arts). However, isn't Antalya a bit too hot to venture outdoors? Urban heat less bearable. Or are you suggesting residing outside the city or oceanfront. (ops, I've ommitted that I'm on a budget)1. Antalya2. Fethiye (proximity to Oludeniz veryyyyy appealing)3. Dalyan4. Bodrum area5 ?

If anyone knows of organizations (with contact #'s) for these areas I would appreciate greatly.

Thank you!

Ph.

D. in beachologyP.

S. Let's not underestimate the long term effects of linguistic isolation. I read a few posts by Brit couples who ultimately gave up because of social isolation. And, (lol) I don't even own a pet (or much beyond my dream to live a simple life in T.). Yes I've already visited once, a decade ago, then loved Cesme (for its long deserted beach) but I'm not intending to settle that much north. According to seismic maps Antalya shakes less.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am in the Mezitli region of Mersin which is about three hundred miles east of Antalya.

Your plan of trying several places is a good one.

When I first moved to Turkey we went to Didim, I did not like it much - too small and tourism is the main industry so limited things to do off season. Stayed there three months and could not wait to get away, going there was an expensive mistake. We ended up in Mersin because my wife's sister lives here and she has several friends here.

Mezitli has a long beach that is not used that much, I have never seen it really crowded.

Mersin is a large urban city with plenty of restaurants and shopping, to the west of the city the coast has many bays, and little islands. as well as many historic sites.

It does get hot here in the middle of summer so air conditioning is a must. Many of the more wealthy locals have houses near the Taurus mountains where they can go to escape the heat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

HelloI am living in the UK but thinking of moving to the coastal area around Kas. I too am a single female in search of a better life style.

I am visiting in early April to look at the area and view some of the properties for sale.

Its nice to know I am not the only brave or mad woman!

S

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Babiole and welcome to our forum. No, you are not the only one so don't worry. i think we have had about 6 females recently all making the move to Turkey. We do have members who live in that area who will offer you help should you need it. I hope you keep posting as we would like to hear how you get on :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Babiole, welcome to Turkey Central. No you're not mad, unless we are all mad and in that case you're in good company. If you see me in Kaş say hello and I'll buy you a drink and have a chat.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Remember the Agean is not very warm in the winter and a lot of the places close down. Whilst Antalya has lots of ameneties İ personally find it too big and busy and prefer Alanya. Although the summers are warm especially July and Aug you adjust and live accordingly. Try them and see what you think good luck.
Link to post
Share on other sites

hi there,I'm Jade and thought I'd give you some ideas:Look at AntalyaCentral.com website as there are lots of expats on it who live here in Antalya.

Also go into InterNations.com and look at the Antalya forum. I met 2 English ladies through this website 2 weeks ago and they both live 10 minutes away from where I live!!!

Here in Antalya there is a place called St. Paul's Centre in the old quarters of the city. It's a church but also a meeting place, both for foreigners and Turks and they offer, for instance, courses to learn Turkish, line-dancing and lots of other things. The church is upstairs and downstairs, usually in the beautiful courtyard, people just walk in and meet other people.

Be glad to show you around when you come here.

Yes, it's unbearably hot here the end of July and August but apart from that, Antalya is a wonderful place to live. Usually the winters are mild, but this one- this year it was long and cold and wet!!!

Look forward to meeting you here.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to all new members whether they be mad, brave or both.

Cesme is not the place you remember beachologist, it has grown and become extremely popular and you would be unlikely to find the beach(es) empty.

What ever any of you do, if you plan to buy, wait and rent for at least a year as Abi advised as it's much easier to relocate if you find you don't like the area after all.

It's a buyers market and likely to remain so for the foreseeable future as so much building is going on all over the place.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A few years ago I lived in Çesme for around 6 months * but I got so bored there I kept going up to Istanbul to visit friends. It's a nice place but as from (at the latest) mid-October it's absolutely dead for the whole of the winter!

I just read some comments about Alanya. I go to Alanya quite a lot from Antalya but I personally am not so very fond of Alanya as it's very German-orientated. Don't get me wrong - I lived in Germany 21 years and enjoyed it, but there are so many cafes, restaurants etc etc serving German food and it's much more expensive there than Antalya.

What I like here is the authenticity of the place with all its amenities - summer and winter alike. It wasn't built for tourists(like Kemer for example) so it's got a Turkish feel to it (thank goodness).

I also lived near Istanbul for many years and also in Fethiye but I must say I prefer Antalya. Yes, it's a huge city and there are skyscrapers all over the place but the Bay of Antalya is really beautiful.

That's what I think!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Beachologist, you have started an excellent topic for anyone wishing to relocate to Turkey. This topic is sure to bring replies not only to help you, but others with the same questions.

Wow Jade, you've been around. I had considered moving to Antalya myself, but from what I saw of the city, outside of Kaleici (around the ancient Roman harbor) it seemed to me to be just another city. Konyaaltı Beach was beautiful, Lara Beach also... so those two beaches are real pluses for moving to Antalya. Maybe I was wrong about a few things.

Most people who move to Turkey, I think, go to one place on holiday, like it, and buy property there. They know little or nothing about any other place in Turkey. Obviously you are not one of those people. I have traveled along the entire Mediterranean and Aegean coast from Mersin to Çanakkale, and have spent at least a little time in every resort town in-between. But I still don't know the best place to live. I thought I did.

I moved from Izmir to Kaş, a place where many Turks tell you is the best place to live. But it's dead in the winter and this last winter bored me to no end. Kaş drew me in as soon as I saw it, it's an idyllic, beautiful place. But after being here for a while I think this is not the place for me. I am probably going to move from here and will need to decide where to go, it will probably be Fethiye or Antalya for me next... I am not sure which. I need to be closer to a proper city.

Jade, tell us more about Antalya and why you live there.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good morning,I also spent several months in Fethiye but it's the same as in all the small resorts - dead in the winter!

That's why I like Antalya: there are always events on here - for instance, the Piano Festival, the Guitar Festival - even a Beer Festival! There's theatre, opera and concerts and the expat community here is quite large. A lot of the expats meet at St. Paul's centre which is located in the old quarters of the city. Of course, Kale Ici is a very interesting place but there's more to Antalya than that. Yes the beach in Konyaalti is fantastic, as is Kundu beach with all kinds of water sports but there's also the beach in Guzeloba - next to Sera Hotel,which is also fantastic. Nearby you can visit Termosos - an amphi-theatre in the mountains 28 kms outside of Antalya. Then you can visit Kemer and Çiralı on a day excursion. The museum in Antalya is extremely interesting on the Konyaalti too. So I would recommend relocating to Antalya and not Fethiye. Antalya's become a really international place in the past few years and there are several clubs here - for instance there's a club where you can go for walks at the weekend and there are Turks who join the walks and several foreigners too. Then there's a cycling club, a photography club and lots of other clubs here too.

That's why I love Antalya!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks to all, particularly to J a d e and Ken.

Tree primordial themes seem interlaced here. Weather, Location, and Lifestyle.

We -people from the north- wish to migrate in search not just of sunny skies and stunning landscapes but also for the chance to reinvent our lifestyle. As Jade, Ken and others so eloquently point out, after the first moving phase, a second arises which involve lifestye questions, such as urban vs small-town, social life vs anomie.

Ken seems to have learnt that for him a charming town loses its appeal after awhile it fails to provide stimulation, and Jade's experiences are that small towns -with seasonal lives- leave us somewhat lifeless without cultural activities and the opportunity to engage in artistic pursuits and socializing.

My own concern for expat urban living is not just (language) but the known fact of anonymity and looser social ties. Expat communities without cultural activities compel people to form close knit groups, with people spending more time playing together than seeing plays at the theater. As someone who has exhausted her urban lifestyle filled with countless cultural activities every week, I now seek the outdoor life, the opportunity to be surrounded with good joyful friends to laugh and play with on a daily basis. This entails good weather (how can one join a cycling group in that sort of summer heat?) and people with a common culture. Thanks for underlining that English speaking is insufficient, that ethnicity matters as much (I hear Antalya is a city of Russians, I too have nothing against them but ...).

But I think at the stage of deciding where to move to, the first factor is weather. It appears to me -from my distance, and what a distance!- that Turkey has 2 bad months in summer and 2 in winter. I haven't been able to conclude-from the subjective data I've read-how Fethiye differs from Antalya in terms of climate. Would love to read Jade's views on this. In fact, I'd love an indepth description of the Coastal climate, as objective as possible. Yes I've researched metereological reports and climate analysis, all in vain.

I also think Jade's account is invaluable in stressing how stunning geographies lose their appeal after we've experienced them, how some places leave us feeling shut-off from our cultural selves, distancing us from engaging in social/outdoor activities in larger format, organized groups, enabling us to select who to befriend.

I thank you all for leading me to soul-search a bit more about these topics and for helping me to realize that I may need to get more realistic. A beachologist may soon tire of beach life like a sunseeker may despair on rainy days. In my case, I do know that I'm migrating with the project of spending time with people, time to create new social bonds, and turn my back on a lifetime of urbanity in the ultraindividualist, impersonal north.

Jade, I'd be thrilled to accept your offer, but since I can't be reached here, please contact me: canadiana (beachologist) in TL.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good morning and some info about the weather here and in Fethiye,I've writtten here before that it's extremely hot in Antalya in July and August. It's also very humid so these months are not so enjoyable unless you can spend all day on the beach and in the sea! During the weather we have bad storms for around 6 - 8 weeks, usually starting in January, but last winter was an exception and the rainy seaon started in October.

On the whole Antalya is very humid. The air is much drier in Fethiye, but then Fethiye is much cooler than Antalya in the winter.

Dear beachologist,could you write your full email address so that I can write to you personally pse?jade

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Welcome to all new members whether they be mad, brave or both.

Cesme is not the place you remember beachologist, it has grown and become extremely popular and you would be unlikely to find the beach(es) empty.

What ever any of you do, if you plan to buy, wait and rent for at least a year as Abi advised as it's much easier to relocate if you find you don't like the area after all.

It's a buyers market and likely to remain so for the foreseeable future as so much building is going on all over the place.

Hi there,I hear you say it is a buyers market? We are looking to buy in Fethiye and looking at property in 2 weeks time, Are prices falling due to the saturated market or prices rising, we are in a better position to buy next year, but worried prices will rise, so dont know what to do, any feedback?
Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum wooferdog.

Unless you know what life is like in all seasons in Turkey, I would advise against buying straight off, rent for a year to see if you really like the place in winter as well as summer and never buy off plan as too many people have been ripped off.

I would not like to predict the market but I can only guess that prices are unlikely to go up as there are so many properties on the market and more being built all the time. The only thing that might affect the market is that people from some countries, such as Russia, which doesn't have a reciprocal arrangement with Turkey are now going to be allowed to buy here.

Link to post
Share on other sites

İ would also endorse the rent first not buy opinion. İts so different living here all year as against a holiday and those who buy quckly often find they have made a costly mistake. Try an area for a while and İ would stress research all your options.İ love Alanya even July & Aug and İ am not a beach bunny.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to our forum wooferdog, At the moment foreigners can't buy property due to the new law being changed and can only sell to Turks. They haven't given a date when this will start up again, people are obviously hoping it will be in the next few weeks, but nobody really knows for certain as far as I'm aware. We will of course let everyone when it happens. Nobody knows exactly how the new law will be worded as whilst the law was passed it is now with the Cabinet to decided what exactly the changes will be. Once that is done the Tapu/Land Registry offices will be informed.

If you do buy a property ensure that you check out the Tapu and can confirm that the Tapu is genuine and the seller is the rightful owner and has no loans outstanding on the property also if there are monthly maintenance payments that they are all paid and up to date. Other important things to check are the Habitation Certificate, if the property hasn't got a HC you aren't legally allowed to live in it. Also check that the property conforms to the building permission ie that it is the same size etc. If there is a swimming pool make sure that there is planning permission for it. Don't be temped to put it into someone else's name unless you know what you are doing, just wait until the new law is up and running.

Are you buying with a view to living in it full time or to rent out?. If you are taking out a mortgage and hoping to cover the payments by renting out it's not a wise thing unless you are very lucky. If you use an agent to manage the bookings be very careful and check them out first. If you use someone as a key holder you also need to check them out very carefully as well. It's not unknown for people to let properties out without the owners consent.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...