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On Advice from AbiWell, I had been checking out Tulumba and was glad it was recommended! I went ahead and got the steel and porcelain tea kettle. And it arrived today :) Will try to make tea in it tomorrow after work. Very pleased with Tulumba's service, thanks for the recommendation :birgits_coffee[1]:

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Looks very smart Reyhan. I hope you enjoy many cups of Turkish tea. Me? Mr sunny and I will stick to our tea bags that I bring from the UK. :D

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Around here they just put the tealeaves in the top pot without rinsing them,often in a special little muslin strainer, bring the water to the boil then pour it on the dry leaves before continuing as you do Mimar.

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That's interesting !

I've also heard of people not favoring pouring boiling water at all onto the leaves saying it burns them and instead fill the top with cold water at the beginning and wait for it to heat indirectly while sitting on top of the other pot. I had never realized tea could be so complicated.

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Hmmmm, I wonder how many different ways there are to make tea in Turkey?

I'll have to ask my S in Ls how they make tea in Adana. I've never taken any notice when visiting them.:)

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I make the tea similar to yours, Mimar, but I just pour a small amount of cold water onto the dry leaves, just enough to wet them, and they warm up on top of the bottom pot as it comes to the boil. (I've been told the top pot should only be warmed, it should never boil as this makes the tea taste bitter). If there's sufficient cold water in the bottom of the top pot, the boiling water, when poured around it, will not make the tea bitter. Once the refilled bottom top has reboiled, it mustn't be left on the heat too long or it may again become bitter.

I try to follow all these rules but it's still a hit and miss affair. :confused1[1]:Enjoy your cuppa Reyhan ! :birgits_coffee[1]:

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They're some good tips - I will try that method next time (though our caydanlik is not nearly as posh as yours Reyhan!). I've usually just put the leaves dry in the top pot while the water beneath boils. Wetting them makes a lot of sense.

This is what happens when you don't get to spend a lot of time with your mother in law and have to rely on the husband to show you how it's done!

I've used Tulumba too -they ship to the UK. There's a UK site available now though - http://www.turkishsupermarket.co.uk/Enjoy your cay Reyhan. We add a small amount of Earl Grey to a standard supermarket brand, which we like.

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Ah thanks for the great tips here. :blush-anim-cl[1]: I'll have to try them all to see which works the best for me. Sadly right now I am the only one here who drinks the tea.(one day maybe will have friends over) But there is something İ didn't understand even after reading all the ways of making it. For those who put the leaves directly into the top kettle, then add the hot water to the top kettle, how are the leaves strained out when pouring the concentrated tea (from the top kettle) into glasses? My

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Yes, you put the tea leaves in the strainer. :)

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I have a small round strainer with a handle that you place over the tea glass or cup as you pour. However, we don't usually bother straining the tea - only a small amount of leaves go into the glass, and they quickly settle to the bottom of the glass.

When pouring, I like my tea acik (light) so I just pour about a third of a glass of tea, then top up with hot water. for other people I usually pour just short of half a glass from the top kettle.

Do you have tea glasses and the little spoons?

I bought a gorgeous set from Pasabahce in Ankara - larger than usual and shot through with blue glass, with matching glass stirrers. Unfortunately hubby managed to break all but one, so I've just got standard ones now, but very pretty square saucers (tabak).

Even if I don't use them often, they look nice on display in the kitchen!

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Tea glass, check:)And by the way, tried as you said Sirin and it turned out good.

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Two tips from me:1. you can get a fine mesh strainer here in Turkey that fits inside the teapot over the hole where the tea goes into the spout, filters out ALL the tea leaves, even the little bits.2. putting one clove in the top teapot gives a nice flavour to the tea.

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Well done Reyhan, that looks as though you've got it right. :)I use the filters that are like a mini fishing net - a bit of wire and mesh that you can buy on the market. They filter out everything because I can't stand bits floating in my tea. :) If offered tea in a shop I usually ask for adaçayı - sage tea which is served with a slice of lemon. :)I've just talked to one S in L. She puts the tea in the pot and then puts a very small amount of water on the tea and mixes it and pours it out. This removes the dust/tiny particles of tea. She then put it on the 'kettle' until the water boils and then pours the boiling water on the tea leaves. She says if you are using 'iri' (large) leaves there is no need to wash the tea. :)

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