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  1. I am currently visiting Turkey on holiday and I would like to extend my stay. However, it will mean that the visa I used to come in on will have expired as it says I can only be here for a month. I arrived on Sept 14 and I am currently meant to leave on October 6. But I want to leave on October 23 or 24 depending on what the costs are to change my air ticket back to South Africa. Is it possible for me to get on the which is valid until 11 March 2020, or must I leave Turkey as I have a Schengen visa and apply for a new visa while outside the country? Your assistance is greatly appreciated.
  2. With Turkey's e-visa system, the process of buying a visa is as easy as booking a flight or hotel. Citizens of Europe, the UK, the USA, and many other countries can get a multiple-entry e-visa with a validity period of 180 days, allowing up to 90 days in Turkey. Citizens of some other countries can get also get an e-visa, but with a shorter validity period and fewer days in Turkey allowed. Citizens of some countries don't need a visa to enter Turkey. You can learn if you're one of them by entering your travel document information into the e-visa application system as explained below. What is an e-Visa? An e-visa is a printed, electronically signed, barcoded document that allows you to enter and stay in Turkey for a specified number of days until it expires. It usually allows multiple entries and exits and replaces the sticker visa, which was previously purchased on arrival at international airports and other border gates. You can buy an e-visa at https://www.evisa.gov.tr/. You must download and print your e-visa before presenting it, with your passport, to border control personnel. Am I Eligible for an e-Visa? To learn if you're eligible by nationality, or if you can enter Turkey with your national ID card without a visa, you can use the e-visa website. Using the e-Visa Website to Determine Your Eligibility You don't have to buy a visa to check your eligibility. Once on the e-visa website home page, click "Apply." Then select the country which issued your passport or other travel document and its type and complete the security verification. If you're eligible to buy one, the system will tell you the validity period of the visa and the number of days it allows you to be in Turkey. If you're ineligible or there's something else you must do to get a visa, it will tell you. And there will be a link to a page with additional information. This page may tell you that you must first get a European "Schengen visa" qualifying you to visit European countries. Or it may tell you to go to a Turkish embassy or consulate in your country to apply for your visa. Passport Requirements Your passport must be valid for: at least 180 days beyond the date you enter Turkey and at least 120 days from the date you leave Turkey and at least 60 days beyond the expiration date of your e-visa. The e-Visa Application Process Here's the whole process, step-by-step. Apply for Your e-Visa Go to www.evisa.com.tr. Click "New Application" at the bottom of the page. Enter your nationality, type of passport, and the anti-spam verification code. Click "Save and Continue." The next page will tell you if you need a visa or not, or a passport or not. It will also tell you the fee. Enter your date of arrival. The system will calculate and display the duration of your visa's validity and the number of days you can stay in Turkey during that period. Your visa's validity period will begin on the date of arrival you chose. Click "Save and Continue." Enter your personal and passport information. Ensure it matches your passport exactly, since the immigration official will check your visa against your passport. Verify that the information you entered is accurate and click "Submit." The next page will tell you your information was submitted successfully and that an e-mail has been sent to the address you entered. Pay for Your e-Visa Open the e-mail the system sent you, click the link to return to the e-visa system, and pay with your credit card or another payment method. Cost of an e-Visa The cost of an e-visa is usually the equivalent of around 20 US dollars, but it varies according to nationality. The system will calculate it for you. Download Your e-Visa Once you've paid, the system will send you a second e-mail with a link to download your e-visa. Click on the link, download the e-visa, print it, and present that to the border control officer when you enter Turkey. Insider Tip: While it's a good practice to save a copy of your e-visa, border control officials won't accept an electronic copy you show them on your smartphone. You must give them a printed paper copy. After you arrive in Turkey, keep a printed copy of your e-visa and your passport with you. Turkey's e-Visa Video This YouTube video also walks you through the process. Can I Get an e-Visa when I arrive in Turkey? No. But you can get a sticker visa. A border control officer will show you where to get one. I don't recommend doing it this way. It's much easier and less of a hassle if you get an e-visa before you board your flight to Turkey. How Can I Get a Visa from a Turkish Embassy or Consulate? If the e-visa system says you must get your visa from a Turkish embassy or consulate, you must be flexible on your travel plans, since it can take up to 90 days after you submit your visa application for it to be approved. To submit a visa application at a Turkish embassy or consulate, you must make an appointment. How to Make an Appointment at a Turkish Embassy or Consulate Go here: https://www.konsolosluk.gov.tr/visa. Choose the embassy or consulate where you want your appointment to be. Fill out the appointment application form and submit it. The system will give you a choice of appointment dates and times to choose from. Staying in Turkey Beyond the Time Your Visa Allows If you want to stay in Turkey, to continue a sightseeing trip or to live as a resident, you must apply for a short-term residence permit. You can get a short-term residence permit with a duration from 30 days to 24 months, whether you're staying in a hotel, with a friend, or renting an apartment with a rental contract. Learn how to apply for a short-term residence permit. Turkey e-Visa Applications for Your Family You can get visas for yourself and up to 10 family members at the same time, as long as they are from the same country, have the same type of travel document and have the same date of arrival * * Note: Entering the same date of arrival for all family members into the e-visa system doesn't mean everyone must enter Turkey on the same day. But if you want to get visas for family members, you must do it as if you are all visiting at the same time, so all of the visas have the same validity period. On the second page of the e-visa website, after you enter your personal information on the second page of the e-visa website, click "Add New Person." Do this to add personal information for up to ten family members. Once you've entered the information for all family members, click "Continue." The e-visa website will total the visa fees into a single payment amount. Once you pay, it will send you a confirmation e-mail with a link to download your family's visas. What if I Lose My E-Visa? You can get your e-visa e-mailed to you. On the e-visa website, click the "Contact Us" link at the bottom of any page. Fill in the form and in the "Feedback" section, explain that you've lost your e-visa and ask them to e-mail it to you. e-Visa Assistance The e-visa website has a page for frequently asked questions (FAQ). Just click on the FAQ link at the bottom of any page. https://www.evisa.gov.tr/en/info/ Beware of e-Visa Website Lookalikes Many websites mimic the official e-visa website. They use the same colors and design and can fool you into thinking you're using the official e-visa system. You'll often see them in paid advertisements at the top of search engine results. If you buy your e-visa from one of these websites, they'll charge you not just for your e-visa, but for getting it for you, which is entirely unnecessary. All Turkish government websites, including the e-visa website, end with ".gov.tr" suffix. Don't use websites with addresses ending with .com, .net, or any other suffix. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He now lives in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  3. To enter Turkey you must have a visa unless your country has a bilateral agreement with Turkey which exempts you from needing a visa. What is a Visa? A visa is a permission to enter Turkey and remain temporarily. A visa typically has A Validity Period: beginning on the day the visa becomes active and ending on its expiration date. The validity period can be anywhere between one and six months. A maximum number of days you can be in Turkey: A visa also gives you a limited number of days you can be in Turkey during its validity period. So you could have a visa with a validity period of 180 days, allowing you to be in Turkey for up to 90 days. If you want to remain in Turkey beyond your visa's expiration date or beyond the number of days it allows you to be in Turkey, you must apply for a residence permit. Types of Visas E-visa Citizens of many European countries, the UK, the US, and many other countries can buy an e-visa online. It's much like buying an airline ticket. Just enter your passport or other travel document information, your personal information, and your planned day of arrival, then pay for the visa with a credit card. Citizens of some countries can visit Turkey without a visa. To learn if you're one of them, the e-visa system will tell you when you enter your travel document information on the first page of the e-visa system. The e-visa system is at https://www.evisa.gov.tr/. Insider Tip: Make sure the website has the ".gov.tr" suffix. If it doesn't, it will be a company that may get your e-visa for you while charging you for the service. Once you enter your information and submit it, the e-visa system will give you a link to download your e-visa and print it. To enter Turkey, present your passport and the printed e-visa to the border control officer. While in Turkey, you must keep your passport and the printed e-visa with you. To learn if you're eligible for an e-visa, the duration of the e-visa you're eligible for, and the number of days it will allow you to be in Turkey, enter your passport or other travel document information and submit it. You don't have to buy an e-visa to get this information. The system will also tell you if you must get a visa from a Turkish embassy or consulate. Learn more about the e-visa. The e-Visa Validity Period Your e-visa will have a validity period, which begins on the date it's issued and ends on a date a certain number of days after the issue date. These two dates don't change. The expiration date is always a definite date on the calendar. In all cases, if your e-visa goes past its expiration date, you'll have no visa at all. You'll have to buy a new visa to re-enter Turkey. Here's an example. If you're a citizen of a European country, the USA, the UK, or of certain other countries and get an e-visa on 5 February, it'll be valid for a 180-day validity period starting on 5 February and ending on 2 August. You can start using your e-visa any time you want from 5 February to 2 August, and you can enter Turkey and leave as many times as you want until 2 August, the last day of the validity period. But the total number of days you can be in Turkey can never exceed 90 in any 180-day period. I'll explain that part next. The Maximum Number of Days Allowed in Turkey Within a Range of Days Depending on your nationality, the visa rules will set a maximum number of days you can be in Turkey during a certain range of days. For example, if you're a citizen of a country as mentioned above, you can be in Turkey for a maximum of 90 days during any 180-day period. If you stay in Turkey for more than 90 days in any 180-day period, those days over the 90-day limit will be an overstay. Important!: Don't confuse the validity period with the date range used for the maximum days of stay. They're two completely different time periods. The validity period always starts and ends on a set calendar date. The range of days during which you can't exceed a maximum number of days is always counted back from whatever day "today" is. For citizens of European countries, the UK, Canada, Australia and many other countries, visas are limited by this 90-in-180-days rule. Visas for citizens of other countries have the same limitation but with a different number of days. To learn more about the visa limitations, see: 90-in-180-Days Rule, How it Works and How to Do the Calculation. Work Visa The work visa is a single-entry visa issued to those who have been employed by a Turkish company. It's valid for six months. If you want to work in Turkey, you must first find a job and receive an employment contract. In coordination with your employer in Turkey, you'll go to a Turkish embassy or consulate and apply for a work visa. At the same time, your employer will apply for and obtain your work permit. After you travel to Turkey with your work visa, you'll go to your place of employment and get your work permit. Learn how to apply for a work visa and work permit from outside of Turkey. Learn how to apply for a work permit from inside Turkey. Student Visa A student visa is a single-entry visa issued to those accepted as a student by an accredited Turkish school or university. It's valid for six months. To get a student visa, you must first obtain a letter of acceptance from the school or university you want to attend. Then you'll go to a Turkish embassy or consulate to apply for your student visa. After you travel to Turkey with your student visa, you'll go to your school or university and apply for your student residence permit. Learn more about the student visa. Learn more about the student residence permit. Getting a Visa from a Turkish Embassy or Consulate If the e-visa system tells you to get your visa from a Turkish embassy or consulate, you can use Turkey's consular appointments website to make an appointment at any Turkish embassy or consulate in the world. The appointment system is at https://www.konsolosluk.gov.tr/. Passport Validity Requirements Your passport must be valid for: At least 180 days beyond the date you enter Turkey. At least 120 days from the date you leave Turkey. At least 60 days beyond the expiration date of your visa or residence permit. Visas for citizens of Europe, the UK, and the US have a validity period of 180 days. So your passport will have to be valid for 240 days beyond the start date of your visa. Visa Exemptions Citizens of some countries don't need a visa to travel to Turkey for touristic reasons. To learn if you can travel to Turkey without a visa, go to the e-visa online application system and enter your passport or travel document information. The system will tell you if you can use your ID card to enter Turkey. Visa Extensions There are no visa extensions. If you want to remain in Turkey beyond the amount of time allowed by your visa, you must apply for a residence permit. You may apply at any time during the 60 days before your visa's expiration, or before you reach the maximum number of days your visa allows you to be in Turkey. Learn more about residence permits. Travel Insurance Travel insurance is required by law for people visiting Turkey with a visa. I've never heard of anyone from the Turkish government checking to see if travelers have health insurance, but it is required. Travel insurance can protect you from financial loss due to medical treatment, trip cancelation, a lost deposit on a rental property, and theft. TravelInsurance.com is a website where you can enter your trip details and get quotes from multiple world-class insurance companies. Learn more about travel insurance. If you later apply for a residence permit, you'll need to buy a Turkish private health insurance policy to cover you for your residence permit's duration. Learn more about the required health insurance for your residence permit. If Your Visa Application is Rejected If your visa application is rejected, you'll receive a letter explaining why it was rejected. If you want to appeal the decision, first write a letter to the authority which rejected it, asking them to reconsider. If they again reject your application, your only recourse is to go to court. Residence Permits While a visa allows you to visit Turkey temporarily and leave, a residence permit will enable you to live in Turkey. You must already be in Turkey, with a visa or visa exemption, to apply for a residence permit. The type of residence permit you'll most likely be applying for is the short-term residence permit, which can be issued with a duration of one month to two years. Learn how to apply for a short-term residence permit. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He now lives in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  4. If you're planning to visit Turkey multiple times with one or more visas, there's a limit to how long you can be in Turkey. It's called the 90-in-180-days rule. This article is about how the rule works and how to do a simple calculation to be sure you're in compliance. What is the 90-in-180-Days Rule? The 90-in-180-days rule states that, with a visa, you can't be in Turkey for more than 90 days in any 180-day period. It doesn't matter how many visas you buy or if you buy a second visa after the first one has expired. If your stay in Turkey ever exceeds 90 days in any 180-day period, it is an overstay. Depending on the length of the overstay, you may be fined and even banned from re-entering Turkey from three months to one year. There Are No Visa Extensions If you want to stay in Turkey for more than 90 days in any 180-day period, you can't extend your visa. You must apply for a short-term residence permit. You can get one with a duration of one month to two years. Checking Your Compliance with the 90-in-180-Days Rule From whatever day you're doing the check, count back 180 days on the calendar. You can do this manually or with an online calculator. If the total time of your stay in Turkey has not exceeded 90 days in that previous 180 days, then you may remain in Turkey until you reach a total of 90 days in the previous 180 day period. An Example of a Manual 180-day Countback Let's do a countback from October 1st. Count back 180 days. You'll see that the date 180 days ago is April 4th. Use dates from the entry and exit stamps in your passport to determine your total number of days in Turkey on and since April 4th. Subtract that number from 180. The result is the number of days you may remain in Turkey. Doing the Countback with an Online Visa Calculator Search for a visa calculator in your favorite search engine. You'll see that it's also called a Schengen Visa Calculator. That's because Turkey's visa rules follow those of a collection of European countries called the "Schengen Zone," which have the same 90-in-180-days rule. These visa calculators count back 180 days or any other number of days according to your visa. They also allow you to enter your dates of entry and exit to and from Turkey, then give you a result which tells you how many more days you can stay. Smartphone Visa Calculator Applications Visit your smartphone's application store and search for "visa calculator" or "Schengen visa calculator." They work the same way as the online versions. Conditional Entry: An Exception to the 90-in-180-Days Rule If you've reached a total of 90 days in Turkey on your 180-day visa, leave Turkey and then return, you can re-enter if you sign a form promising to apply for a residence permit within ten days. This form is called a Şartlı Girişi Bilgi Formu (Conditional Entry Information Form), which you can get from the border control police. If you fail to apply for a residence permit in the next ten days, you'll have to pay a fine when you exit Turkey again. You'll also be banned from re-entering Turkey from three months to one year, depending on the amount of time you were in Turkey. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He now lives in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  5. Travel insurance is required by law for entry into Turkey. While this law isn't strictly enforced, it's still a good idea to buy a policy to protect you from financial loss and cover you if you require medical treatment. What is Travel Insurance? Travel insurance is a temporary insurance policy that protects you from financial loss, which might occur in a variety of potentially unfortunate or disastrous events. These events include medical emergencies, hospitalization, theft or loss of property, and even the cancellation of your trip. A travel insurance policy typically becomes active on the first day of your journey and ends on the last day. If you're traveling to Turkey with a visa (or your ID card, if you're visa-exempt) and plan to get a residence permit to live in Turkey, travel insurance can cover you until you arrange health insurance for your residence permit. What Does Travel Insurance Cover? Travel insurance "package" policies cover a variety of events you're most likely to need coverage for. You can also buy add-on supplements to cover things like baggage loss and your liability while driving a rental car. Here are some of the things that travel insurance can cover: Trip Cancellation If your trip is canceled for reasons beyond your control, or if you have an emergency that causes the cancellation, you can be reimbursed for your payments for flight tickets, hotels, and even deposits or prepayments for holiday rental properties. Missed Connections or Delays If you miss your connection or your trip is delayed for reasons beyond your control, you can be reimbursed for hotel expenses and other expenses you incur because of the delay. Loss or Damage of Personal Items Travel insurance can cover loss, damage, and theft of baggage or other valuable items such as cameras, computers, and mobile phones. Illness and Injury If you become ill or have an accident and go to a Turkish hospital, you'll have to pay for your treatment in cash or by credit card. If it's a severe illness or injury, you may be hospitalized and end up with a substantial medical bill. Depending on your policy, travel insurance will cover most or all of these. Medical Evacuation and Repatriation If you're transported over a long distance, or by air, or if you must be medically evacuated to your home country, travel insurance can cover this, too. When to Buy Travel Insurance The best time to buy a travel insurance policy is just after you book your trip. At that point, you'll know your itinerary and what expenses you'll need to cover. You'll need this information when you apply for a travel insurance policy. Price The price of a travel insurance policy will vary according to the destination and details of your trip, and the cost of transportation and accommodation, among other things. Read Your Policy Carefully Be sure you know what your travel insurance policy covers. Some things will probably not be covered, such as "adventure sports" like scuba diving, rock climbing, and even quad biking. Use a Travel Insurance Comparison Website A comparison website allows you to enter your trip information and what you want to be covered, then receive automatic quotes from several different insurance companies. You can compare their coverage and prices and select the policy you like the best. TravelInsurance.com Turkey Central is partnered with, and recommends, TravelInsurance.com. They're the world's leading travel insurance comparison site, where you can buy an insurance policy as easily as you can book a flight. Enter your personal information and the details of your trip, and you'll get instant quotes from top-rated insurance companies. Then you can select the policy you want and pay for it by credit card. They'll send your policy in minutes, by e-mail. Best Price Guarantee Travelinsurance.com guarantees the price you pay will be the lowest available. Get a Free Travel Insurance Quote Now! Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He now lives in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  6. Foreigners are typically deported from Turkey because they didn't get a residence permit or didn't extend it, then lived in Turkey until the police caught them. While a short overstay involves paying a fine on departure and perhaps a ban of three months to a year, a long overstay can involve detention and forced departure, and a five-year ban. Deportations are carried out by the Göç İdaresi Genel Müdürlüğü (Directorate General of Migration Management, or immigration office). Reasons You May Be Deported from Turkey You may be deported from Turkey if you: Are convicted of a crime resulting in imprisonment. Are found to be a member or supporter of a terrorist or criminal organization. Use forged or fake documents when entering Turkey or when applying for a residence permit Work in Turkey without a work permit or make a living through illegal means. Pose a threat to public order, safety, or health. Stay in Turkey for more than ten days beyond the validity period of your visa or visa exemption, or if your visa or visa exemption is canceled. Apply for a residence permit more than ten days after your previous residence permit has expired and don't have a valid reason for your overstay. Remain in Turkey after your residence permit is canceled. Enter or exit Turkey illegally. Enter Turkey while banned from doing so. Administrative Detention You can be physically detained and placed in a detention facility if you: Are an escape risk. Have violated the laws concerning the entry and exit procedures of Turkey. Have used forged documents Didn't leave Turkey by a date on which you were ordered to leave. Pose a threat to public order, safety, or health. Maximum Detention Period The maximum detention period is six months. It can be extended if you have no documents showing your country of origin, if such documents are fake or have been forged, or if your uncooperativeness causes the court to be unable to make a decision. Release from Administrative Detention Every month, the provincial government reviews the cases of people in administrative detention. If they find your detention is no longer necessary, they may release you and require you to stay at a particular address and periodically report to government officials. Deportation You can be deported to: Your country of origin. The country you were in before arriving in Turkey. A third country as decided by immigration officials. Travel Expenses of Deportation If you're deported, you'll be responsible for your travel expenses. If you can't pay them, the immigration office will. You'll have to repay the immigration office before you'll be allowed to enter Turkey again. What to Do if You Have a Long Overstay Don't wait until you're caught. It just takes a policeman asking for your ID card or someone calling the authorities to bring an unpleasant end to your stay in Turkey. If you meet any of the criteria above for deportation, contact your country's embassy or consulate. They can assist you in turning yourself in and leaving voluntarily. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He now lives in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  7. You can get a student visa only after you've received a letter of acceptance from an accredited school or university in Turkey. Once you've received your letter of acceptance, you can apply for your student visa at the local Turkish embassy or consulate. When your student visa is ready, you can pick it up and use it to travel to Turkey. Then you can enroll at your school or university and apply for your student residence permit. How to Get a Student Visa and Use it to Go to Turkey 1. Find an accredited school or university you want to attend and apply to become a student. Use the internet to search for a school or university you might want to attend. You can also use the Wikipedia list of Turkish universities, here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_universities_in_Turkey. Visit the websites of the schools and apply according to their instructions. 2. Receive a letter of acceptance from the school or university. The letter of acceptance is the main document that will allow you to get a student visa to travel to Turkey. You'll also receive a new student orientation package and instructions for getting your student visa. 3. Collect the documents for your student visa application package. Your school will tell you what you need, but they'll most likely include: Student certificate or acceptance letter from the school you will be attending Passport, with an expiration date at least 60 days beyond your duration of stay Biometric photo Letter from your parents or legal guardian giving you the authorization to travel and study in Turkey (if you're under 18 years of age) A statement saying that you'll have enough money to live on while studying in Turkey 4. Make an appointment at a Turkish embassy or consulate. You can make an appointment at any Turkish embassy or consulate, anywhere in the world, at https://www.konsolosluk.gov.tr/. The site is available in Turkish, English, French, and Arabic. How to Make an Appointment at a Turkish Embassy or Consulate to Apply for Your Student Visa 1. Select the embassy or consulate you'll be going to when you bring your documents to apply in person. 2. Enter your name, passport number, and other information as required. 3. Upload scanned copies of the documents above, including your photo. 4. Choose an appointment date at the Turkish embassy or consulate that you selected previously. Once you've completed the online application, you can download it and print it. You'll take that with you when you go to your appointment. 5. Go to your appointment with your acceptance letter and other documents. A consular officer will check to make sure you have all of the required documents, then tell you when you can expect your student visa to be ready for pickup. They'll either notify you when it's ready or give you a date to come back. 6. Return to the Turkish embassy or consulate and pick up your student visa. Your student visa will be a durable sticker placed permanently onto one of the pages in your passport. It's valid for 180 days and allows you to enter Turkey one time. 7. Travel to Turkey using your student visa. To enter Turkey, you'll only need your passport. It will have your student visa glued to one of the pages. 8. Formally enroll in your school or university. Report to your school's foreign student affairs office and formally enroll. They'll give you an enrollment document and, if you're in a dormitory, a document to show the immigration officials that you have an address. 9. Apply for your student residence permit. Some universities are authorized to issue student residence permits. For others, you'll need to make an online appointment with the Göç İdaresi Genel Müdürlüğü (Directorate General of Migration Management). After that, you'll take a second package of documents to apply for your student residence permit. Your student affairs office will help you with your student residence permit application. To learn how to apply for your student residence permit, see: A Complete Guide to Applying for a Student Residence Permit. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He now lives in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  8. This article is for those who will be applying for work in Turkey from outside Turkey. If you have already been in Turkey with a residence permit for at least six months, see: Apply for a Work Permit While in Turkey: Eligibility, Required Documents, and the Application Process. If you want to travel to Turkey for work, you must first find a job and have a job offer or contract from an employer. You'll then attend an appointment at a Turkish embassy or consulate and get a reference number to send to your employer. Your employer will then apply for your work permit, as the Turkish embassy or consulate arranges your work visa. Your work visa and your work permit will be arranged simultaneously. You won't have to go through a second application when you arrive in Turkey—you'll just pick up your work permit and start working. The Work Visa to Work Permit Process Here's what you'll need to do. 1. Find a Job and Get Hired. To learn how to find a job and a list of websites which have jobs in Turkey, see Jobs in Turkey: Employment Websites and Tips for Finding Employment. 2. Receive an Employment Letter or Contract. 3. Make an Appointment at the Local Turkish Embassy or Consulate. Turkey has an online system where you pre-apply for a work visa. Go here: https://www.konsolosluk.gov.tr/ Select the Turkish embassy or consulate nearest your location and enter the site. At the upper right, click "Visa." From the drop-down menu, select "Visa Pre-Application." That will take you to the visa pre-application form. At the end of your pre-application, the system will let you choose a convenient date and time to go to the Turkish embassy or consulate. Then it will give you a link for you to download and print your pre-application appointment document. 4. Go to Your Appointment Go to the address printed on your appointment document. Take these documents with you: Appointment document Employment contract and/or invitation letter from your employer Passport (must be valid for at least 60 days beyond the expiration date of the work permit, so it must have at least 425 days of validity remaining) Copy of your passport, including the photo, identification information, and validity dates Four biometric photos University diploma or certificate which qualifies you for the job Official translation of your diploma or certificate* *If you need to have something translated, the consular official will tell you where to go. Sworn Turkish translators have offices near Turkish embassies or consulates. After your appointment, the consulate will send you an e-mail with a reference number to send to your employer. 5. Send the Reference Number to Your Employer. Once they have this reference number, your employer will open a work permit application using an online application system. This must be done within ten days of your appointment at the consulate. While your employer probably already knows this, remind them anyway, because if they don't make the application within ten days, you'll both have to start the process again. 6. Receive Approval If your work permit (and work visa) are approved, the embassy or consulate will notify you and tell you to return to get it. 7. Make a Second Appointment to Get the Visa. You'll go to the consulate with your passport, a confirmed one-way ticket to Turkey, and a travel insurance policy, and pay the fees. You'll leave your passport for them to affix the work visa onto one of your passport's pages. Fees: You'll need to pay the following fees (current for 2021): Work permit fee: ₺1,017.80 Work visa fee: ₺758.90 Work permit card printing fee: ₺125 Your employer may pay one or more of these fees depending on your agreement. 8. Pick Up Your Passport and Visa Return to the consulate and pick up your passport and work visa. You can also have them mail it to you if you provide them with a pre-paid, self-addressed envelope. 9. Travel to Turkey and Enter with your Work Visa Your work visa will be valid for 180 days, for a single entry. You can travel to Turkey any time you want during that period. 10. Go to Your Workplace Go to your new workplace and report in. You'll then receive your work permit and start working. Your Work Permit To learn about the work permit itself, see Turkey Work Permits: Types, Benefits, and How to Get One. Accompanying Family Members If any of your family members will be accompanying you to Turkey, talk to the embassy or consulate personnel about getting them a visa also. Citizens of many countries can get an e-visa online. Some can even come to Turkey with their national ID card. And others may be required to get their visa from an embassy or consulate. In any case, of your family members must travel to Turkey using their own visa or ID card. They can't accompany you with your work visa. After arriving in Turkey, your family members can apply for a short-term residence permit. The short-term residence permit is issued for up to two years and extended indefinitely. After you've worked in Turkey for one year, your family members can apply for a family residence permit, which is issued for up to three years. If you have children, they'll be allowed to go to public schools in Turkey for free. Work Permit Law The law concerning work visas and permits in Turkey is Law Number 6735, International Labor Force. Assistance and Support The Ministry of Family, Labor, and Social Security: They have a national customer service number, which, from within Turkey, is 170. From outside of Turkey, call +90 216 170 1122. Yükseköğretim Kurulu (Council of Higher Education, or "YÖK"): If you will be working at a University, contact the Council of Higher Education, at +90 312 298 7000. Work Visa and Work Permit Forums: If you have questions about work permits, search our work permit forums, or open a topic. We have quite a few expat members who have already been through the process and can help. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He now lives in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  9. Most visa or residence permit overstays are minor issues, involving a foreigner forgetting when their visa expires or accidentally staying longer than their visa allows. Short overstays only involve a fine on departure. But longer overstays can include a re-entry ban of three months to a year. Very long overstays (for years) can incur a ban for up to five years. Typical Reasons for Overstaying Besides a validity period (the time from the date your visa was issued or activated to its expiration date), every visa also has a limit on the number of days it allows the visitor to be in Turkey. For citizens of many countries, including European countries, the U.K., the USA, Canada, and Australia, an e-visa has a validity period of 180 days, and it allows the traveler to be in Turkey for a maximum of 90 days in any 180-day period. This is called the "90-in-180-days rule." If your visa goes past its validity period, or if you've been in Turkey for more than 90 days in the previous 180 days, you'll be in overstay status. Visas of other countries have a different validity period and number of days allowed in Turkey. Read you visa to learn the rules. Visa Overstay Fines If you stay in Turkey beyond the expiration date of your visa or remain for more days than it allows, you may be fined at the airport or other border gate when you leave Turkey. The calculation of your fine will depend on your nationality and the length of your overstay. The total fine amount consists of a penalty for the first month and additional months of overstay in U.S. dollar equivalents. There will also be a fee for a single-entry visa and the amount you would have paid for printing your residence permit card if you had applied for one (which you should have!). Here's what citizens of European countries, the U.K., the US, Canada, Australia, and many other countries can expect to pay. If you're not from one of these countries, the following should give you a general idea of what you can expect to pay. Overstay Fine Amounts First Month Overstay: $50 USD (equivalent) Additional Months Overstay: $10 USD (equivalent) per month Single-entry Visa Fee: ₺758.90 Residence Permit Card Printing Fee: ₺125 How the Fine is Calculated The fines for the first and subsequent months of overstay are self-explanatory. The Turkish government also charges a single-entry visa fee and a residence permit card printing fee, which are fees you should have paid if you had obeyed the law. It's also a way to ensure there's no financial incentive for foreigners to overstay their visas. Why You Must Pay a Single-entry Visa Fee The single-entry visa fee is paid during the residence permit application process by citizens of countries who have a visa exemption. Because you'll be in overstay status, you'll have no valid visa, so you'll have to pay for one as part of the penalty. You'll have to pay this fee no matter what kind of visa you used to enter Turkey, and even if you're visa-exempt. Why You Must Pay the Card Printing Fee If you'd followed the law and applied for a residence permit, you would have paid this fee. So even though you won't receive a residence permit, the Turkish government isn't going to let you get out of paying a fee you should have paid anyway. Thankfully, they don't also charge the residence permit processing fee, which is a much higher amount. Turkey Residence Permit Overstays and Fines The fee calculation works the same way with residence permit overstays. Once your residence permit expires, if you haven't applied for an extension, you'll have ten days to depart Turkey or pay a fine when you leave Turkey. Instead of Overstaying Your Residence Permit, Consider Leaving Turkey and Returning with a Visa If your residence permit expires, you can leave Turkey, buy an e-visa, and return the next day. After you return with your e-visa, you can apply for another residence permit. Turkey Re-entry Bans If you're caught by the authorities more than ten days after your visa or residence permit expires, you may be arrested, fined, deported, and even banned from re-entering Turkey for three months to a year. If you have an excessive overstay (involving years), you can be banned for up to five years. For short overstays over ten days, the Turkish police can be quite lenient. They may tell you that you must leave Turkey and take no further action. But don't count on it. Turning Yourself In If your overstay is an excessive one, it's much better to turn yourself in to the authorities than to get caught. Before you do so, it's probably a good idea to contact your country's embassy or consulate first, then let them arrange it. According to Article 9/4 of Law No. 6458, Foreigners and International Protection, if you turn yourself in to the authorities and make arrangements to leave Turkey before you get caught, your re-entry ban will be a maximum of one year. How to Know If You're Banned from Re-entering Turkey If you were banned, the immigration officials should have notified you about the ban and the duration of the ban. And just because you're able to get an e-visa doesn't mean your ban has been lifted. You'll still be stopped at the airport or border gate and sent back home. If you think you're banned from re-entering Turkey, contact a Turkish embassy or consulate and ask them to check your status. Having a Ban Lifted You may be able to have your ban lifted if you apply to a Turkish embassy or consulate and pay an application fee. The Turkish embassy or consulate will forward your application to the ministry of the interior in Ankara, who will decide if the ban should be lifted. If you were banned because of a failure to pay a fine, you must pay it at the Turkish embassy or consulate before you can do anything else. Be Polite and Respectful to Border Control Officials Some travelers have reported having overstays of several months, then after being polite and respectful to the border control officer involved, receiving a lower fine than they expected, without a deserved re-entry ban. On the other hand, some travelers have been angry and disrespectful, resulting in a higher fine and a re-entry ban. So when you're interacting with border control officials about your overstay, by all means, be polite! Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He now lives in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  10. If you've stayed in Turkey for the maximum time allowed on your visa, then leave the country and want to return, you can do so as long as you sign a form called a 180 günde 90 Gün Uygulaması Kapsamda İkamet İzni Şartlı Giriş Bilgi Formu (Information Form on Residence Permit Conditional Entry Within the Scope of 90 Days in 180 Days Implementation). That's quite a mouthful! So for short, people (including Turkish border control personnel) call it a Şartlı Giriş Formu (Conditional Entry Form). What Is a Şartlı Giriş Formu (Conditional Entry Form)? A Conditional Entry Form is a document on which you declare your intention to apply for a residence permit within ten days. It allows you to re-enter Turkey, even after you've exceeded the number of days on your visa. You can get one by asking a border control official when you arrive at any border control point or international airport. Once you've signed it, the Conditional Entry Form will allow you to be in Turkey for a period of ten days, during which you must apply for a residence permit. Who Can Re-enter Turkey with a Conditional Entry Form? Anyone who has a Schengen Visa, or anyone whose visa allows them to stay in Turkey for up to 90 days in a 180-day period and who has met or exceeded the 90 days can re-enter Turkey with a Conditional Entry Form. If you have a different type of visa, contact your local Turkish embassy or consulate for guidance. What Does the Conditional Entry Form Say? In English, it says: "As per the records it is understood that you have expired 90 days stay period within 180 days within the scope of the first paragraph of article 11 of the Law on Foreigners and International Protection No. 6458. However, your entry to the country may be permitted in the case that you accept and fulfill the condition of applying for a residence permit within 10 days to the Foreigners Branch Directorate / Foreigners Bureau Directorship in the province/town that you live." Make Sure You Apply for a Residence Permit Within Ten Days! If you re-enter Turkey with a Conditional Entry Form then fail to apply online for a residence permit within ten days, you will be subject to deportation and a re-entry ban. The ban can be for up to two years. To learn more about how to apply for an e-visa, see Turkey e-Visa: Eligibility Rules, Online Application Process, Requirements, and Two Alternatives. To learn more about the 90-in-180-days rule which limits the amount of time you can be in Turkey with a visa, see Turkey Visa: The 90-in-180-Days Rule, How it Works and How to Do the Calculation. To learn more about how to apply for a short-term residence permit, see A Complete Guide to Applying for a Short-term Residence Permit in Turkey. Assistance and Support Turkey Central Forums: Do you have a question? Search our forums to see if it's already been answered. If it hasn't, feel free to open a new topic. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He now lives in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  11. I have my temporary residence permit application receipt on A4 paper which states I can leave Turkey for up to 15 days. I had to leave Turkey for family reasons and due to the incompetence of the airline I used to get back to Turkey, my time outside Turkey will exceed 15 days. I believe I need a new 90 day e-visa to re-enter Turkey. Is that true? Does this mean that my temporary residence application is now invalid? Do I have to restart the application process?
  12. Hi everyoneI've asked this question to a number of lawyers/judges and no one seems to be able to give me a definite answer. In June 2013 I will have been in Turkey for 5 years. The first 3.5 years were on the 90 day visa, which I obviously renewed as necessary. Since the 90/180 rule came in, i've been on a long term tourist visa which expires next month. After that I intend to apply for the normal residence permit, for a year or so. Does the 5 year residence requirement for citizenship include time spent on a tourist visa, or do they only count the years where you have stayed with a residence permit? There is no definition of "residence" in the act, and like I said I have't been able to get a uniform answer from the law talkin guys. Thanks for your help
  13. i read your article about the visa calculation and i also used the calculator you put as a link.but i just don't understand every time i arrive in turkey they tell me something completely different. now i arrived on the 28.2.2020 the last time i was here was from the 12.9.19-13.11.19 = 63 days.. so the online visa calculator tells me i got 90 days but at the passport control they tell me 26 days and that i have to leave after that otherwise i get a fine.. i had several of those experiences! once they thought me my visa is finished ( not in the passport control in an office) so i got a flight the next day and wanted to leave and on the airport they thought me i have 28 days left... well do i have 90 days as the online calculator says because its moving 180 days??? i hope my question is clear and you can help me...really slowly i don't know anymore!
  14. I have a Colombian passport which allows 90 day entry without the need for a VISA. Does this allow for multiple entries? My plan is to visit Turkey for tourism, spend a weekend in Italy and come back into Turkey for a few more days. Am I allowed to do this without the need for the eVisa?
  15. hello hello . i need to go to Finland for an Esports event that i qualified with my team. i moved to turkey a year and half ago and i'm self employed ( my job is being a professional gamer & content creator ) . i don't have SGK and i need to apply soon. was wondering how it's gonna affect my request for visa. i'd appreciate any info if anybody knows about this. P/s: i've had schengen visa on my passport before and i also have a 5-year multi for canada if it helps
  16. I was in the process of renewing my resident permit when my mom was diagnosed with cancer. I had to leave almost immediately to care for her. I did not have everything ready to submit so I submitted what I had and left Turkey. My application was subsequently rejected. I knew that this was going to happen so I went and got a 15 day travel document. I have been in the US for 6 months which is obviously way longer than 15 days. I am ready to go back- I have my e-visa and ticket. What can I expect when I arrive in Istanbul? Am I going to have to pay some kind of fine for staying out longer than 15 day? TIA
  17. Dear forum, I’m from Sweden and moved to Istanbul together with my girlfriend to join her for her exchange semester at the Istanbul Technical University. The 90/180 rule applies to me as a tourist, however, as I have been entering and exiting the country several times this year (and will at least 2 more times this year) I am not sure how to count and whether I will need a residence permit or not. I already went here on April 18th for vacation and stayed for 11 days. On the 28th of August I came back to Turkey with my girlfriend for her school start, exited again for a week, and then came back again. I will leave again on the 28th of October and in total I will then have spent 67 days in Turkey (including the days in april). Thing is, if we count from 18th of April (my first entry) and 180 days onward, that period would end 14th of October. Does this mean, that by my time of re-entry to Turkey (which will be on the 2d of November), a new 180 day period will start of which I can utilise another 90 days of stay on a tourist visa? All the best, Marcus
  18. Hi I dont know if im in the right page Since im not a turkish national, but my fiance is. Hes been here in Philiplines for 3 years he love and like philippines i know that, now I supposed to go with him but i need visa but Immigration in philippines didnt give us a chance to arrange anything. they hold my fiance in airport even his exit clearance is feb 6 so he have enought time to fix everything. i didnt see him since they are not allowed to contact or talk or see anybody. Now what we Planned is im the one the one who will come but the im worried i stop already from my job. and what visa i need and information. someone have experience or any idea? thanks
  19. Can you please confirm me if anyone overstay on tourist visa, one of my friend want to stay more for 7 days after his number of days allotted. he was allowed to stay up to 7 days and but he want to stay 7 days more, could you please confirm if there are any penalty and how much is the penalty per day?
  20. I would like to know if the 90 days rule is depending on the person or on the passport, means if someone has 2 passports, can he/she stay in the country 180 days by using 2 passports or not?
  21. It will be my first time to go to Turkey and I have a tourist visa if ever I want to extend my stay what can I do? can I apply for Short Term Residence Permit? Or is there any other option for me to extend my visa?
  22. Hi. It will be my first time to go to Turkey, if ever I want to extend my stay can I apply for Short Term Residence Permit?
  23. Does time spent outside Turkey visiting Greece mean i will have extra time up to 90 day limit when i return?
  24. Hello everyone my name is Dominik and I'm from Poland so i need get e-visa with 90 180 days rule,and now my question is, I was in Turkey since 05.01-24.01 and later since 20.02-26.04 all stay was around 87 days i guess, the visa valid finish the 02.07.19 and i want to get another visa for come Turkey the 06.07 for 12 days but my question is the 180 days are discounting since first day i came to Turkey (05.01)? or the last exit from Turkey (26.04)? can somebody explain me it please?
  25. My partner and I have been in Turkey now for almost two months within these last 90 days and intend to settle after a short trip to Europe next week. I will then apply for our short term residence. Our intention is to buy a property here in Alanya, but will not have made the purchase before our official 90 day allowance expires. We'll obviously have to apply as tourist extensions since we don't have a Tapu (title deed) yet but am wondering if in applying for a tourist visa and explaining to the immigration officer we are here to purchase a property could be a source of a headache at the interview rather than a just asking for simple tourist residence permit and not tell them these plans?... We already have all residence permit requirements ready to go but want it to be hassle free as much as possible. What do you guys think?
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