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  1. When applying for a residence permit, work permit, citizenship, or a driving license, you must provide one or more biometric photos. Usually, you must also scan one of them and upload it to an online application system. What is a Biometric Photo? A biometric photo is an ordinary photograph you can have taken at any photoshop. The photo must be of a specific width and height (determined by the government organization which requires it). It must display enough detail of your facial features so it can be scanned by a device that records, from the photo, the relative distances between your facial features. The measurement information from these photos is stored in a database so it can later be compared with your real face. A practical example of the use of biometrics is when you enter a country with your passport. You present your passport (which has your facial biometric information stored in a chip) to the border official. A facial recognition scanner then scans your face and compares the measurements of your facial features to data stored in your passport. In that way, they can know it's really you. The key thing to know is that a biometric photo is just a high-quality photo of your face. It would be more accurate to call it "a high-quality photo suitable for biometric measurement of your facial features." But that would be even more confusing, so they just call it a "biometric photo." Where Can I Get a Biometric Photo? You can have a biometric photo taken at any photography studio in Turkey. Just say "biometric photo" in English, and they'll know what you need. It takes maybe five or ten minutes to get the photo taken, and maybe 30 minutes for them to print it, so after you have it taken, go have a coffee and come back to get it. Biometric Photo Standards You must submit a photo which meets the biometric photo standards for a residence permit. The immigration office has put out a Word document which explains exactly how your photo must be. Immigration Office Biometric Photo Standards Download Download the above document and take it with you to the photo studio when you get your photo taken. If your photo isn't right, your residence permit won't be approved. The immigration office will send you a message to bring them a proper photo. Here are immigration office guidelines for a good biometric photo, taken from that document: 1. The face and hairstyle must be centered on the photograph and completely visible. Contrast must be controlled well, details must be sharp and clear enough. The height of the face must be between 32 mm and 36 mm and comprise between 70% and 80% of the photograph. 2. There must not be spots or distortion on the photograph, colours must be neutral and the photograph must reflect the natural colour of the face. 3. Your photograph must be taken while you are looking at the camera directly, eyes must be open and clearly visible, and hair must not cover the eyes. 4. Head must be upright and must not be facing any other direction, person must not smile or have any other expression, and mouth must be closed. Right and left features of the face between tip of the chin and hairline must be completely visible. 5. Background of the photograph must be without a pattern or shadow, for the ones who have dark hair it must be white and for the ones who have fair-hair it must be midtoned grey. 6. Light must be projected on the face equally, there must not be any reflection, shadow, or "red eye" on the photo. 7. Eyes must be clearly visible, there must not be any reflection on the glasses, sunglasses or coloured glasses must not be worn, frame of the glasses must not cover the eyes. 8. Except for the accessories that the person has out of necessity such as eyeglasses, objects such as hats, caps, or pipes must not be used. 9. For the photographs of the persons who wear a head covering, the face must be visible between the tip of the chin and forehead, there must not be any shadow on the face, and the colour of the scarf must be different than the colour of the background. 10. For the photographs of the minors there must not be anyone else or any object in the photo and also attention must be paid to the other points above. Assistance and Support Turkey Central Forums: Do you have a question? Search our forums to see if it's already been answered. If it hasn't, feel free to open a new topic. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He now lives in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  2. Hi everyone! My name is Selim and i am a British Born Turk, My father is Turkish and my Mother is Turkish Cypriot. For years now i want to get Turkish Citizenship via my father and i have looked into the process but it seems confusing and quite hard to do? I contacted the Turkish Consulate in London and they told me i need my birth certificate, my UK passport and a Medical Certificate (Letter from Doctor saying I'm in good health?) I don't think a letter is enough, do i need to get a proper Health Certificate from somewhere? My Birth Certificate, UK passport and other things have to be Translated, notarised and apostatised? Where on earth do i get my Documents translated and noterised?? I looked everywhere. I found on the gov.uk website i can easily get the documents apostatised but the translation of the documents and notarisation is the hard part. Plus, i know that if i get my Turkish Citizenship they may call me into the Army. It's something I'm not so keen on doing but i did look things up and if i paid (Bedeli Askeri) then i can pay off from not doing military service but it will show that it was done. It's £1,000's but i think it's worth it. Any advice or help, i would be greatly appreciated Selim
  3. Hi there, my name is Erdal and this is my very first post.. I am 37y old, my mother and father are Turkish born, but we emigrated to the Netherlands when I was 8y old and we all have double (dutch and turkish) nationality. The Dutch parliament soon will treat a new proposal for a law. If taken, it will mean that any person with a Dutch passport and another passport will loss his Dutch passport if he lives outside the Netherlands or the European, and (I emigrated to Chile 4 years ago). My aim is to keep my Dutch passport. For this reason I want to get renounce my Turkish citizenship. But it seems that before you can do this you need to first postpone your military service. Until 2004 I always postponed on time the military service. Due to negligence and laziness I did not do it afterwards. However 3 months ago I was a couple of days in the Netherlands and applied for the maximal extension possible (until the end 2012, the year in which I become 38y old). I would be grateful if somebody could some light on: 1) How long does a decision takes before the Turkish ministry of Defense takes a decision for postponement? 2) Does somebody (preferably with double nationality) renounced his citizenship? What were the EXACT things they ask you to bring to the embassy/consulate? When I was 3 months ago in the consulate in the Netherlands, I did not told I emigrated to Chile (so as not to complicate the postponement application). But, after official acceptance of my military service postponement for me the best would be to apply from Chile. 3) Would be sufficient just to show my Dutch passport and renounce at the Turkish embassy in Chile? Somebody from the Turkish consulate in the Netherlands (informally) told that the best would be to do it from Netherlands because they have all the information on me. My apologizes if I made it a bit too long. But basically I am asking for people who renounced there citizenship to share there experience with us. I will keep posting any new information I discover. Take care, Erdal
  4. If you meet one of the following requirements, you can apply for citizenship in Turkey at any office of the Nüfus ve Vatandaşlık İşleri Müdürlüğü (Directorate of Population and Citizenship Affairs, or Nüfus). If you're outside of Turkey, you can apply to a Turkish embassy or consulate. Four Ways to Become a Turkish Citizen 1. By Birth If you have at least one Turkish parent, then under Turkish law, you're already a Turkish citizen, so the process mostly involves proving this. To learn more, see Turkish Citizenship by Birth. 2. By Marriage If you're married to a Turk for three years. You must prove that you're married to a Turk and that the marriage is legitimate. To learn more, see Turkish Citizenship by Marriage. 3. By Naturalization If you've been living in Turkey for at least five years, you can apply for citizenship without having to have a Turkish parent, be married to a Turk, or make an investment in Turkey. You'll need to speak Turkish, be familiar with Turkey, Turkish history, and Turkish culture, and show evidence that you intend to live in Turkey. To learn more, see Turkish Citizenship by Choice. 4. By Investment If you invest an amount equivalent to USD 250,000 in real estate, or if you invest the equivalent of USD 500,000 in: Government bonds A venture capital fund A real estate investment fund Fixed capital assets of a Turkish company A bank account. You must keep your investment in place for at least three years. You may invest in more than one type of investment, and move money between them during the three year commitment period. To learn more, see Turkish Citizenship by Investment. Documents Required for a Turkish Citizenship Application The citizenship package consists mostly of identification documents and documents proving various things about yourself, and additional documents proving that you have met at least one of the conditions for citizenship. You can download an application, according to the terms of citizenship you're applying for, at https://www.nvi.gov.tr/hizmetlerimiz/vatandaslik-hizmetleri/vatandaslik-formlari. On page 2 of all of the forms is a list of the required documents that you'll need to include in your application package. Citizenship Appointment If you're in Turkey, you'll apply to the Nüfus. There's a Nüfus office for each province and district in Turkey. You can make an appointment at any Nüfus office online, at https://randevu.nvi.gov.tr/. The Nüfus also has a national helpline you can call for free, from any telephone in Turkey, at 157. The international number is +90 312 591 2133 or 2389. The helpline has an option for English. If you're outside of Turkey, you'll apply to the nearest Turkish embassy or consulate. You can make an appointment at any Turkish consular mission in the world online, at https://www.konsolosluk.gov.tr/. During the appointment, you'll submit your application and its accompanying documents. Citizenship Application and Interview If you're applying for citizenship by marriage or by choice, you'll be interviewed by a citizenship board, consisting of local officials, who will interview you in Turkish. At embassies and consulates, a consular official will do the interview. If you've been married to a Turk for at least three years, the interview is quite lenient. Even if you don't do so well, it won't disqualify you. The main thing they'll be concerned about is that the marriage is genuine. If you're applying for citizenship by birth or by investment, there's no citizenship board and no interview. There's only a review of your application package to make sure all of the required documents are there. In the case of citizenship by investment, you can even have a representative, with power of attorney, attend in your place. If you're applying for citizenship by choice, the interview is more stringent. You'll have to speak in Turkish about yourself, Turkey, Turkish history, and Turkish culture, and provide evidence that you intend to live in Turkey. Citizenship Approval Process Once the Nüfus or the embassy/consulate approves your package, they'll send it to the Ministry of the Interior for final approval. If you're applying for citizenship by investment, they'll send it to the Office of the President. Expect to wait around three to six months for final approval. In the case of citizenship by investment, your application will be fast-tracked and approved within 60 days. Receiving Your Turkish Identity Card After the final approval, your kimlik kartı (identity card) will be printed and sent to your local Nüfus, or to the embassy or consulate where you applied. Someone will then call you to come and pick it up. When you do, it's a good time to also apply for your Turkish passport. Dual Citizenship Turkey has no laws which prohibit dual citizenship. However, some other countries do. So, before you apply for Turkish citizenship, you should check the laws of your own country first. To learn more about dual citizenship, see Dual Citizenship Rules. Name Changes You won't be required to change your name to a Turkish one, but you can adopt a Turkish name if you want one. To learn more about the name rules, see Rules for non-Turkish names. Other Ways to Live in Turkey Permanently Without Being a Citizen You can also live in Turkey with a short-term residence permit that you extend for as long as you want. There's also a long-term residence permit you'll be eligible for after living in Turkey for eight years and an unlimited work permit you can get if you have a long-term residence permit or have been working in Turkey continuously for eight years. Turkish Citizenship Law Turkish Citizenship Law is the Turkish Nationality Act No. 5901 as amended. Assistance and Support The Nüfus handles citizenship applications made within Turkey. You can call their national helpline from any telephone in Turkey, at 150. Their international number is +90 312 591 2133 or 2389. It has an English option. For citizenship applications made outside of Turkey, contact your local Turkish embassy or consulate. Turkish Citizenship Forum: If you have a question about Turkish citizenship, search our citizenship forum to see if it's already been answered. If it hasn't, feel free to open a new topic. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He's now retired and living in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  5. When you become a Turkish citizen, you can choose a Turkish name if you want one. Or you can keep your birth name if it meets certain rules. If it doesn't meet these rules, it will be changed accordingly. Turkish Name Rules Your name must only have letters found in the Turkish alphabet, which excludes W, X, and Q. Your given (first and middle) names mustn't exceed two, and only one abbreviation is allowed. Your surname (last name) must be one word There must be no punctuation anywhere in your name. Turkish Citizenship Law Turkish Citizenship Law is the Turkish Nationality Act No. 5901 as amended. Assistance and Support The Nüfus handles citizenship applications made within Turkey. You can call their national helpline from any telephone in Turkey, at 150. Their international number is +90 312 591 2133 or 2389. It has an English option. For citizenship applications made outside of Turkey, contact your local Turkish embassy or consulate. Turkish Citizenship Forum: If you have a question about Turkish citizenship, search our citizenship forum to see if it's already been answered. If it hasn't, feel free to open a new topic. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He's now retired and living in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  6. Turkish law allows you to be a citizen of Turkey and of one or more other countries. However, some other countries prohibit this. If your home country prohibits you from becoming a Turkish citizen you will, at some point, be required to renounce citizenship in your home country before you can become a Turkish citizen. Check the laws of your home country first and see if it allows dual citizenship before you apply to become a Turkish citizen. Turkish Citizenship Law Turkish Citizenship Law is the Turkish Nationality Act No. 5901 as amended. Assistance and Support The Nüfus handles citizenship applications made within Turkey. You can call their national helpline from any telephone in Turkey, at 150. Their international number is +90 312 591 2133 or 2389. It has an English option. For citizenship applications made outside of Turkey, contact your local Turkish embassy or consulate. Turkish Citizenship Forum: If you have a question about Turkish citizenship, search our citizenship forum to see if it's already been answered. If it hasn't, feel free to open a new topic. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He's now retired and living in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  7. If you're considering becoming a Turkish citizen, you should know its advantages and disadvantages, and alternatives to citizenship that might be better for you. Here they are. Advantages of Becoming a Turkish Citizen As a Turkish citizen, you can: Have full access to all Turkish government programs Enter Turkey without a visa Enter 110 other countries without a visa or by receiving a visa on arrival Live in Turkey without a residence permit Work in Turkey without a work permit Stay out of Turkey for as long as you want with no time limits Open and operate a Turkish business without any of the requirements levied on foreigners Buy property without having to wait for a military check Run for a political office and vote in local and national elections Contribute to a state-sponsored pension Receive comprehensive health insurance coverage, called Genel Sağlık Sigorta (General Health Insurance) through Turkey's national healthcare plan administered by the Sosyal Güvenlik Kurumu (Social Security Administration, or SGK) Be a dual citizen of both Turkey and your home country as long as your home country allows it Disadvantages of Becoming a Turkish Citizen If you're between the ages of 21 and 41, you may have to serve in the Turkish military (see below) If you get into legal or other trouble, your home country or embassy won't be able to help you, because your status as a Turkish citizen will take precedence If you work, your wages may be lower than foreigners working in the same position Military Service Obligation Generally, all male Turkish citizens are subject to being called into military service. But as a foreigner who's become a citizen, there are two circumstances in which the Turkish government won't expect you to serve: If you're a male over age 24 and become a naturalized Turkish citizen, that is, by choice, and don't have a Turkish mother or father, the Turkish government won't require you to serve in the Turkish military. If you've already served in your country's military, as a volunteer or not, they'll also not require you to serve. To learn more about the military obligation, see: Turkish Citizenship and the Obligation to Serve in the Turkish Military. Alternatives to Turkish Citizenship You don't have to become a Turkish citizen to enjoy many of the benefits of Turkish citizenship. Once you've been living in Turkey for at least eight years, you'll be eligible for two other options to live in Turkey for life and work where and when you want. They are the Long-term Residence Permit and the Unlimited Work Permit. Long-term Residence Permit If you've lived in Turkey for at least eight years without any significant interruption, you can apply for a Long-term Residence Permit. The Long-term Residence Permit gives you the same rights as a Turkish citizen except for things such as voting and running for political office, and of course, you don't have to serve in the Turkish military. It never expires, and you don't have to extend it. To learn more about the long-term residence permit, see A Complete Guide to Applying for a Long-term Residence Permit. Unlimited Work Permit Once you have your Long-term Residence Permit, or have been working in Turkey with a work permit for at least five years, you can apply for an Unlimited Work Permit. The Unlimited Work Permit gives you the right to work for any employer in Turkey, without the restrictions that people with regular work permits have. The Unlimited Work Permit never expires, and it gives you most of the same rights and privileges of a Turkish citizen. Learn more about the unlimited work permit. Dual Citizenship Turkey has no laws which prohibit dual citizenship. However, some other countries do. So, before you apply for Turkish citizenship, you should check the laws of your own country first. To learn more about dual citizenship, see Dual Citizenship Rules. Name Changes You won't be required to change your name to a Turkish one, but you can adopt a Turkish name if you want one. To learn more about the name rules, see Rules for non-Turkish names. Turkish Citizenship Law Turkish Citizenship Law is the Turkish Nationality Act No. 5901 as amended. Assistance and Support The Nüfus handles citizenship applications made within Turkey. You can call their national helpline from any telephone in Turkey, at 150. Their international number is +90 312 591 2133 or 2389. It has an English option. For citizenship applications made outside of Turkey, contact your local Turkish embassy or consulate. Turkish Citizenship Forum: If you have a question about Turkish citizenship, search our citizenship forum to see if it's already been answered. If it hasn't, feel free to open a new topic. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He's now retired and living in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  8. If you want to become a Turkish citizen, but you aren't married to a Turk and don't have a Turkish parent, and you don't intend to invest money for citizenship, this article is for you. After you've lived with a residence permit or worked with a work permit in Turkey for more than five years, you can apply to become a Turkish citizen. Your children can also become Turkish citizens, provided they're under eighteen years of age or are legally dependent on you for their care. In Turkish citizenship law, this method of becoming a Turkish citizen is called "Acquisition of Turkish Citizenship by the Decision of a Competent Authority." Eligibility for Turkish Citizenship To apply for Turkish citizenship, you must Live in Turkey for five years, with a residence or work permit Time in Turkey with a student residence permit doesn't count The five years must be without interruption Be at least 18 years old Demonstrate your decision to settle down and live in Turkey through your behavior, such as Buy property Any property will tend to demonstrate your intent to settle in Turkey, but if you buy a property worth more than the equivalent of $250,000, this automatically qualifies you for citizenship, so if you want to use that option instead, see Citizenship by Investment Retire to live in Turkey with your pension Have no disease which might be a danger to public health Be of good moral character Be able to speak an adequate level of Turkish With a fluency certificate from a language school certified by the Turkish government Embassies and consulates can also issue this certificate based on an interview of you in Turkish Have sufficient income to provide maintenance for you and any family members Be no threat to national security or public order Application for Turkish Citizenship If you're in Turkey, make an appointment at the Nüfus ve Vatandaşlık İşleri Genel Müdürlüğü (Directorate of Population and Citizenship Affairs, or Nüfus) responsible for the district where you live. You can make an appointment online at https://randevu.nvi.gov.tr/ If you're outside of Turkey, make an appointment at the nearest Turkish embassy or consulate. You can make an appointment online at https://www.konsolosluk.gov.tr/ Required Documents for Turkish Citizenship Check with the office of the Nüfus responsible for the district where you live for a current list of documents you'll need. Typically, they include: Application for citizenship form (VAT-3), downloadable from https://www.nvi.gov.tr/hizmetlerimiz/vatandaslik-hizmetleri/vatandaslik-formlari Four biometric photos Passport Copy of your passport Yurda giriş/çıkış belgesi (a document showing all entries and exits to and from Turkey Birth certificate (Turkish / foreign) Current residence permit or work permit, with at least six months validity remaining Health report from a Turkish hospital If married, proof of marital status, which may include Marriage certificate (Turkish / foreign) Divorce certificate(s) from previous marriage(s) Death certificate of spouse, if widowed If you have a spouse or children who will also become Turkish citizens, documents showing the family relationship Criminal record check (Turkish / foreign) Notarized copy of any educational diplomas you have earned Proof of income, savings, or investments which show that you can provide maintenance for yourself and your family members Receipt for payment of the application fee Note: Documents from government records from a foreign country must be legalized for use in Turkey with an apostille, or through the Turkish embassy or consulate in that foreign country. They must then be translated by a sworn translator. Passports which don't use the western alphabet must also be translated. To learn about how to legalize documents for use in Turkey, see: Apostille: What it is, How it Works and How to Get One from Turkey. The Police Visit If you're in Turkey, the police may visit your house. It's a cordial and courteous visit. They do it to make sure you're living where you say you live. They'll also do a brief interview. After the police visit, the Nüfus will contact you and give you an appointment date for your citizenship interview. The Citizenship Interview Appointment Periodically, a "citizenship commission" is formed to interview foreigners who want to become Turkish citizens. This board may consist of the local mayor, chief of police, or other government officials. The interview will be in Turkish. The board members will verify the information you put on the citizenship application form and engage you in an informal Turkish conversation. There is no set list of questions, but they'll probably ask you questions such as: Where are you from? When did you come to Turkey? What's your profession? Are you working now? What's your spouse's job? When did you meet your spouse? What do you think of Turkey? What do you think of the Turkish people? Who is Atatürk? What are the words to the Turkish National Anthem? Final Approval The Nüfus or consular official will combine the report of your interview with the rest of your application package, then send it to the Ministry of Interior for final approval. It may take three to six months before they call you with the outcome. Checking on the Status of Your Application You can check to see if your Turkish citizenship application has been approved by going to https://vatan.nvi.gov.tr/moduller/basvuru/basvurudurumbilgi.aspx. Just enter the Başvuru Numarası (Application Number) and the Doğum Tarihi (Birth Date) and perform the "Captcha" check, then press the enter button on your keyboard. Receiving your Turkish Identity Card Once your identity card is printed, it will be sent to the Nüfus or Turkish embassy or consulate where you applied for citizenship. Then you'll be contacted and asked to come and pick it up. Dual Citizenship Turkey has no laws which prohibit dual citizenship. However, some other countries do. So, before you apply for Turkish citizenship, you should check the laws of your own country first. To learn more about dual citizenship, see Dual Citizenship Rules. Name Changes You won't be required to change your name to a Turkish one, but you can adopt a Turkish name if you want one. To learn more about the name rules, see Rules for non-Turkish names. Turkish Citizenship Law Turkish Citizenship Law is the Turkish Nationality Act No. 5901 as amended. Assistance and Support The Nüfus handles citizenship applications made within Turkey. You can call their national helpline from any telephone in Turkey, at 150. Their international number is +90 312 591 2133 or 2389. It has an English option. For citizenship applications made outside of Turkey, contact your local Turkish embassy or consulate. Turkish Citizenship Forum: If you have a question about Turkish citizenship, search our citizenship forum to see if it's already been answered. If it hasn't, feel free to open a new topic. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He's now retired and living in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  9. Turkish males age 20 to 41 must serve in the Turkish military. If you're a male considering becoming a Turkish citizen or seeking citizenship for your male children, you should take this into account. If You Have a Turkish Mother or Father If you have a Turkish mother or father, the Turkish government considers you to be a Turkish citizen from birth, and you'll be required to serve in the military unless you can legally avoid it. If You Don't Have a Turkish Mother or Father If you don't have a Turkish mother or father and are over age 24 and become a naturalized citizen-that is, by choice, you won't be required to serve in the military. How the Turkish Military Conscription Cycle Works The call-up for military service registration occurs when a Turkish male reaches age 19. Their actual service begins at age 20. Turkish military conscription (draft) generally works with age groups. Here's an example of how it works in a typical year: In July, male Turks born anytime during the year which is 19 years previous are required to apply for military service (in 2021, for example, that birth year was 2002), While applying, the recruits can choose what capacity they want to serve in, such as officer, non-commissioned officer, or private. Anyone who doesn't meet the requirements to be an officer or non-commissioned officer will serve as a private. The recruits may also submit reasons for a postponement of their service, or to be excused from service because of a medical condition. In September, the applications are evaluated, reasons for postponement or excusal from service are considered, and assignments are made. In January of the following year, the first orders to report are sent out. In March of the following year, the first recruits report for duty. Typically the orders are sent out two months in advance of the start date of their training. How Your Education Level Can Affect Your Service If you don't have at least a four-year university degree, you'll serve 12 months as a private. If you have a four-year university degree or higher, you can serve 12 months as an officer, or six months as a private. Reducing or Avoiding Military Service Your Age at the Time of Naturalized Citizenship If you don't have a Turkish mother or father, are over 24 years old, and became a naturalized Turkish citizen after age 24 by choice, by marriage, or by investment, you won't be expected to serve in the Turkish military. This opportunity to avoid military service doesn't exist if you have a Turkish mother or father. If you have a Turkish mother or father, you're legally a Turkish citizen from the day of your birth. So you'll have the military service requirement no matter what. Veterans of the Armed Forces of Other Countries If you've already served in your home country's military, whether it was compulsory or voluntary, you probably won't have to serve again in the Turkish military. Turkey has agreements with many countries stating that if a person has already done military service in one country, and then becomes a citizen of the other, they don't have to serve in the military a second time. This also applies to those who've paid, in their home country, to forego military service. You would just need to have a document which certifies your military obligation, in your home country, has been fulfilled. Postponing Military Service Educational Reasons If you're in high school or have graduated, you can postpone your military service until age 22. If you're in or have graduated from a vocational and technical high school, you can postpone your military service until age 25. If you're a university student, you can postpone your military service until age 28. If you are still in a university at age 28, you'll be required to take a break from your studies and perform your military service. Then after that, you can return to the university. If you've completed your four-year university education and are working on a master's degree, you can postpone your military service for one year. Medical Reasons If you have a temporary medical condition, you can postpone your service until you are well enough and fit enough to perform it. The Askerlik Bedeli: Paying Money to Shorten Your Military Service From time to time, the Turkish government allows some who are obliged to serve in the military to pay a bedel (payment) to have their military service time shortened. They offer this paid opt-out to keep the civilian workforce healthy for economic growth. But it is always subject to the requirements of the military. Those who pay the Bedel attend 30 days of training, which fulfills their military commitment. In 2018, potential recruits born before 1 January 1994 were allowed to pay a bedel of 31,000 TL to have their military service time shortened to a training course of 21 days. After reporting for duty, their training focused on the basics of soldiering, including military customs and courtesies, marching, physical training, and marksmanship. While there have been discussions about making the Askerlik Bedeli permanent, as of this writing, it isn't. It will only be available on a year-to-year basis according to the needs of the government. Contacting the Turkish Recruitment Office You should always clarify your personal situation with the Turkish military directly. There are two ways to do this: Contact the Askerlama Genel Müdürlüğü (General Directorate of Recruitment), at https://asal.msb.gov.tr/. Go to, call, or e-mail the Askerlik Şubesi (Military Local Office) responsible for the area where you live. You can find a list of these offices, which includes their contact information, at https://asal.msb.gov.tr/Askeralma/AsalIletisim. References Law Number 7179, Article 43, as of June 26th, 2019. Consultation with Ender Keleş, Attorney at Law and Managing Partner of E&G Legal, August 22nd, 2019. If you would like to contact Mr. Keleş, you can do so through his website at www.eglegal.net. Turkish Citizenship Law Turkish Citizenship Law is the Turkish Nationality Act No. 5901 as amended. Assistance and Support Milli Savunma Bakanlığı Askerlama Genel Müdürlüğü Bedelli Askerlık: The Turkish military information page about making a payment and doing a shortened term of service. The Nüfus: handles citizenship applications made within Turkey. You can call their national helpline from any telephone in Turkey, at 150. Their international number is +90 312 591 2133 or 2389. It has an English option. For citizenship applications made outside of Turkey, contact your local Turkish embassy or consulate. Turkish Citizenship Forum: If you have a question about Turkish citizenship, search our citizenship forum to see if it's already been answered. If it hasn't, feel free to open a new topic. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He's now retired and living in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  10. If you have at least one Turkish parent, you're already considered to be a Turkish citizen under the law. So, while I'll use words referring to "applying" for Turkish citizenship, the process is just a formality to prove that you have a Turkish parent, and therefore, are a Turkish citizen. At the end of the process, you'll receive a kimlik kartı (identification card) and have all the rights, privileges, and obligations of other Turkish citizens. On your identification card, your date of citizenship will be your date of birth. The Nüfus ve Vatandaşlık İşleri Genel Müdürlüğü, (Population and Citizenship Affairs Directorate, or Nüfus) is the office responsible for processing citizenship applications. Outside of Turkey, Turkish embassies and consulates handle them. Eligibility For Turkish Citizenship by Birth If you have a Turkish mother or a Turkish father, or both, the Turkish government considers you to be a Turkish citizen from the date of your birth. It doesn't matter if your parents were married or not when you were born. It also doesn't matter where in the world you were born. This "citizen by descent" rule doesn't extend to other Turkish relatives you might have, such as a Turkish grandmother or grandfather. However, your family connection with Turkey may help you if you decide to go through the process of becoming a Turkish citizen by choice. Proving Eligibility A birth certificate, naming the parents, is the most common document used to prove Turkish descent. If you don't have a birth certificate with at least one Turkish citizen named on it, contact the Nüfus if you're in Turkey, or your local Turkish embassy or consulate if you're outside of Turkey, for instructions. Learn how to get a birth certificate in Turkey. Learn how to get and legalize a foreign birth certificate for use in Turkey. Application for Citizenship in Turkey Finding Your Local Nüfus Office You must first make an appointment at the Nüfus responsible for the district where you live. There is a Nüfus office in every district of every province in Turkey. You can find a Nüfus office near you on their website, here: https://www.nvi.gov.tr/iletisim/il-ve-ilce-mudurlukleri Making an Appointment Next, make an appointment using the Nüfus appointment website, here: https://randevu.nvi.gov.tr/ Application for Turkish Citizenship Outside of Turkey If you want to make an application for citizenship while outside of Turkey, you must go to a Turkish embassy or consulate. You can make an appointment at any Turkish embassy or consulate using the Turkish government's consular appointment website, at https://www.konsolosluk.gov.tr/ On this website, you can make an appointment at any Turkish embassy or consulate anywhere in the world. Required Documents In general, any document proving you have a Turkish parent, such as your birth certificate with the name of your Turkish parent on it, is enough. If your parents are available, they can also attend your interview. In some cases, the Nüfus, embassy, or consulate may also request a health report to prove that you don't have any contagious diseases which could be a threat to public health. You can get this at any state hospital. Note: As mentioned above, documents from government records of a foreign country must be legalized for use in Turkey with an apostille, or through the Turkish embassy or consulate in that foreign country. They must then be translated by a sworn translator. Passports which don't use the western alphabet must also be translated (no legalization or apostille required). To learn more about legalizing a foreign document for use in Turkey, see Apostille: What it is, How it Works and How to Get One from Turkey. At Your Appointment At your appointment, a Nüfus or consular official will go over the evidence you have provided to prove you have a Turkish parent. If the evidence is accepted, your application for citizenship will be approved, then sent to the İçişleri Bakanlığı (Ministry of the Interior) for final approval. Checking on the Status of Your Application You can check to see if a Turkish citizenship application has been approved by going to https://vatan.nvi.gov.tr/moduller/basvuru/basvurudurumbilgi.aspx. Just enter the Başvuru Numarası (Application Number) and the Doğum Tarihi (Birth Date) and perform the "Captcha" check, then press the enter button on your keyboard. Receiving your Turkish Identity Card When your identification card is printed, it will be sent to the Nüfus office or the Turkish embassy or consulate where you applied for citizenship. The Nüfus or a consular official will contact you and ask you to come and pick it up. Dual Citizenship Turkey has no laws which prohibit dual citizenship. However, some other countries do. So, before you apply for Turkish citizenship, you should check the laws of your own country first. To learn more about dual citizenship, see Dual Citizenship Rules. Names You won't be required to change your name to a Turkish one, but you can if you want to. To learn more about the name rules, see Rules for non-Turkish names. Turkish Citizenship Law Turkish Citizenship Law is the Turkish Nationality Act No. 5901 as amended. Assistance and Support The Nüfus handles citizenship applications made within Turkey. You can call their national helpline from any telephone in Turkey, at 150. Their international number is +90 312 591 2133 or 2389. It has an English option. For citizenship applications made outside of Turkey, contact your local Turkish embassy or consulate. Turkish Citizenship Forum: If you have a question about Turkish citizenship, search our citizenship forum to see if it's already been answered. If it hasn't, feel free to open a new topic. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He's now retired and living in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  11. You, your spouse, and your children can become Turkish citizens with a fast-track program for foreigners who invest in the Turkish economy. You can apply for this program whether you're in Turkey or not, and even have someone with power of attorney make the application for you. You don't have to speak Turkish. You'll need to have the usual documents for an application for citizenship, and one additional document called a "Certificate of Compliance." The Certificate of Compliance The Certificate of Compliance proves you've met the investment requirements for citizenship. It's issued by the government ministry which oversees the type of investment you make. Once you make the investment and get the Certificate of Compliance, you submit it with the other documents in your citizenship application package. Mixing Investments You can make more than one type of investment and even transfer between them, provided the amount you've invested continues to meet the minimum standards. So, for example, you could invest in a house, and real estate investment funds, and venture capital funds, and government bonds, and put some cash in the bank, which all together meet or exceed the minimum investment amount for citizenship. Or you could invest everything into just one type of investment, such as a home. Value Fluctuation Every type of investment fluctuates in value. Some more than others. If the value of your investment later dips below the required minimum, don't worry. You won't have to add more money to it. The value of the investment(s) is required to meet the minimum required amount only at the time they issue the Certificate of Compliance. Methods of Investment, Amounts, and Who Issues the Certificate of Compliance Property (Real Estate) Buying property is the least expensive way you can make to become a Turkish citizen by investment. The minimum investment amount is the equivalent of $250,000 USD. The property must be appraised by a government-authorized appraisal company that issues a valuation report. The tapu (property title deed), must also have a notation that you won't sell the property for three years. The local land registry office will then request a Certificate of Compliance from the Ministry of Environment and Urbanization. Bank Deposits The minimum deposit amount is the equivalent of $500,000 USD. You must sign a declaration stating that you won't withdraw the money for three years. The Certificate of Compliance is issued by the Banking Regulation and Supervision Agency. Government Bonds The minimum investment amount is the equivalent of $500,000 USD. You must sign a declaration stating that you won't sell the bonds for three years. The Certificate of Compliance is issued by the Ministry of Treasury and Finance. Real Estate Investment Funds or Venture Capital Funds The minimum investment amount is the equivalent of $500,000 USD, into one or more mutual funds that primarily invest in real estate or in companies that are developing new products, services, or technology. You must sign a declaration that you won't sell your shares for three years. The Certificate of Compliance is issued by the Capital Markets Board. Fixed Capital Assets The minimum investment amount is the equivalent of $500,000 USD, into a company (or companies) for the purchase of fixed assets such as land, machinery, or other fixed assets. The purchase must be certified by a certified public accountant. You must sign a declaration that you won't withdraw your investment for three years. The Certificate of Compliance is issued by the Ministry of Industry and Technology. Providing Employment for At Least 50 Turks The Certificate of Compliance for this is issued by the Ministry of Labor and Social Security. To learn more about how to get a Certificate of Compliance, contact the ministries or agencies involved. Applying for Citizenship by Investment If you're in Turkey, make an appointment with the Nüfus ve Vatandaşlık İşleri Genel Müdürlüğü (Directorate of Population and Citizenship Affairs, or Nüfus) office responsible for the district where you live. You can make an appointment online at https://randevu.nvi.gov.tr/. If you're outside of Turkey, make an appointment at the nearest Turkish embassy or consulate. You can make an appointment online at https://www.konsolosluk.gov.tr/ Your Appointment During your appointment, you can fill out the required forms as part of a pre-application, and get more information on what investments, documents, and procedures are required to get a certificate of conformity from the relevant ministry. Required Documents You'll need to provide your identity documents, contact information, what type of investment you want to make, and fill out a form providing consent to access various records required to prove that you've made the required investment for citizenship. In general, the documents you'll need to take with you include: Application form, called an Exceptional Acquisition of Turkish Citizenship Application Form (VAT-4), downloadable from https://www.nvi.gov.tr/hizmetlerimiz/vatandaslik-hizmetleri/vatandaslik-formlari Passport Notarized copy of your passport including the photo and identity pages Notarized copy of your marriage certificate, if married Notarized copy of your divorce certificate, if divorced Notarized copy of death certificate, if widowed Notarized copies of documents showing the family relationship of any children Residence permit or work permit (if you have one) Notarized letter of consent for access to bank accounts, securities accounts, land registry records, etc. Certificate of Compliance, if you already have one, if you don't, the Nüfus can tell you what procedures are required to get one Other documents according to the type of investment, such as the title deed, bank receipts for the money transfer, etc. Receipt of payment for the application fee (can usually be made at the embassy, consulate, or Nüfus) To learn how to have a foreign document legalized with an apostille and translated for use in Turkey, see Apostille: What it is, How it Works and How to Get One from Turkey. Passports don't need an apostille but will need to be translated if they don't use the western alphabet. To learn how to get an official translation, see Sworn Turkish Translators: What They Do and How to Find One. Approval of Your Citizenship Once your citizenship application package has all the necessary documents and the embassy, consulate, or Nüfus has approved it, they'll send it to the Ministry of Interior, which will forward it to the Office of the President for final approval. Applications for citizenship by investment are fast-tracked, so you may receive your Turkish citizen ID card in 30 days or so, which is much faster than the usual processing time. Checking on the Status of Your Application You can check to see if your Turkish citizenship application has been approved by going to https://vatan.nvi.gov.tr/moduller/basvuru/basvurudurumbilgi.aspx. Just enter the Başvuru Numarası (Application Number) and the Doğum Tarihi (Birth Date) and perform the "Captcha" check, then press the enter button on your keyboard. Military Service of Children May Be Required One thing that may be a drawback for you is the status of your children. When you become a Turkish citizen, your children can become citizens as well. If they're under 18 years of age when they become a citizen, The Turkish government can call them for service in the Turkish military. Be sure to ask about this and get any answers they give you in writing. To learn about the military service obligation, see Turkish Citizenship and the Obligation to Serve in the Turkish Military. Dual Citizenship Turkey has no laws which prohibit dual citizenship. However, some other countries do. So, before you apply for Turkish citizenship, you should check the laws of your own country first. To learn more about dual citizenship, see Dual Citizenship Rules. Name Changes You won't be required to change your name to a Turkish one, but you can adopt a Turkish name if you want one. To learn more about the name rules, see Rules for non-Turkish names. Turkish Citizenship Law Turkish Citizenship Law is the Turkish Nationality Act No. 5901 as amended. Assistance and Support The Nüfus handles citizenship applications made within Turkey. You can call their national helpline from any telephone in Turkey, at 150. Their international number is +90 312 591 2133 or 2389. It has an English option. For citizenship applications made outside of Turkey, contact your local Turkish embassy or consulate. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He's now retired and living in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  12. Once you've been married to a Turk for at least three years, you can apply for Turkish citizenship. You don't have to meet any residency requirements or be fluent in Turkish. You don't even have to be in Turkey. Besides the usual identification documents and forms, the main part of the process involves proving that your marriage is a legitimate one. Eligibility for Turkish Citizenship by Marriage To qualify for citizenship by marriage, you must: Be married to a Turkish citizen for at least three years, living together as a family and not engaging in any behavior which would be contrary to an authentic and sincere marriage. The marriage must continue throughout the application process Have no disease which threatens public health Be of good moral character Have no history of behavior which could be a threat to public order or national security Have enough income, produced either by you or your spouse, to enable you and any children you have to live in Turkey. Required Documents for Turkish Citizenship by Marriage Check with the Nüfus ve Vatandaşlık İşleri Genel Müdürlüğü (Population and Citizenship Affairs Directorate or Nüfus) responsible for the district where you live for a current list of documents you'll need. Typically, they include: Citizenship by marriage application (form VAT-6), downloadable here: https://www.nvi.gov.tr/hizmetlerimiz/vatandaslik-hizmetleri/vatandaslik-formlari Passport Copy of the photo and identity pages of your passport Two (2) biometric photos Address registration document if you live in Turkey, which you can obtain from the e-Devlet government website Birth certificate (Turkish / foreign) Marriage certificate (Turkish / foreign), and divorce certificate(s) if previously married Death certificate of spouse (if widowed) Health report from a Turkish hospital Criminal record check (Turkish / foreign) Receipt for payment of the application fee Note: Documents from government records from a foreign country must be legalized for use in Turkey with an apostille, or through the Turkish embassy or consulate in that foreign country. They must then be translated by a sworn translator. Passports which don't use the western alphabet must also be translated. To learn how to have foreign documents legalized with an apostille and translated for use in Turkey, see Apostille: What it is, How it Works and How to Get One from Turkey You can make an appointment at any Nüfus office in Turkey at their online appointment website, which is https://randevu.nvi.gov.tr/. Application for Turkish Citizenship by Marriage If you're in Turkey, you'll make the application at the local Nüfus office. If you're not in Turkey, you'll apply to a Turkish embassy or consulate. You can make an appointment at any Turkish embassy or consulate, anywhere in the world, by going to https://www.konsolosluk.gov.tr/. The Turkish Citizenship Interview If you apply for citizenship while in Turkey, a citizenship board consisting of local government officials will review your application. They usually do this on set dates twice a year. If you apply for citizenship in another country, an officer at a Turkish embassy or consulate will do the interview. The interview is always in Turkish. The one they give for citizenship by marriage applications is more lenient than the interview for foreigners seeking citizenship by choice. Foreigners have failed rather badly with their Turkish and were still approved, but the interviewers scolded their Turkish spouses for not teaching them more Turkish! Knowing Turkish isn't one of the requirements for citizenship by marriage, so they do it more to get to know you than anything else. There is no set list of questions they might ask you. The following are some interview questions reported by Turkey Central members: Where are you from? When did you come to Turkey? What do you think of Turkey? Who is Atatürk? What do you think of the Turkish people? What's your profession? How well do you understand Turkish? How did you meet your spouse? What are your spouse's parent's names? Do you see your spouse's parents often? Do you love your spouse's parents? What are the names of your spouse's siblings? Do you have children? Can you make Turkish coffee? To what places have you traveled to in Turkey? They'll also ask your spouse some of these questions. Another popular question is, "what are the words are to the Turkish national anthem?" They ask this to those seeking citizenship by choice, but they might ask you as well, especially if you do well on the other questions. Whether they ask or not, it's good to be prepared. The interview can be quite brief. One Turkey Central member reported that her interview only took five minutes. Approval for Turkish Citizenship After your interview, your application package will be sent to the Ministry of the Interior for approval. It usually takes three to six months for citizenship applications to be approved. You can check to see if your Turkish citizenship application has been approved by going to https://vatan.nvi.gov.tr/moduller/basvuru/basvurudurumbilgi.aspx. Just enter the Başvuru Numarası (Application Number) and the Doğum Tarihi (Birth Date) and perform the "Captcha" check, then press the enter button on your keyboard. Receiving your Turkish Identity Card When your identity card has been printed, it will be sent to the Nüfus office or the Turkish embassy or consulate where you applied for citizenship. They'll then contact you to come and pick it up. Dual Citizenship Turkey has no laws which prohibit dual citizenship. However, some other countries do. So, before you apply for Turkish citizenship, you should check the laws of your own country first. To learn more about dual citizenship, see Dual Citizenship Rules. Name Changes You won't be required to change your name to a Turkish one, but you can adopt a Turkish name if you want one. To learn more about the name rules, see Rules for non-Turkish names. Turkish Citizenship Law Turkish Citizenship Law is the Turkish Nationality Act No. 5901 as amended. Assistance and Support The Nüfus handles citizenship applications made within Turkey. You can call their national helpline from any telephone in Turkey, at 150. Their international number is +90 312 591 2133 or 2389. It has an English option. For citizenship applications made outside of Turkey, contact your local Turkish embassy or consulate. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He's now retired and living in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  13. If you and your spouse or partner have a child who was born in Turkey, they aren't automatically a Turkish citizen. Turkish citizenship for a child is based on the citizenship of the parents. If Neither Parent is a Turkish Citizen If neither you nor your spouse or partner is a Turkish citizen, you must apply for a residence permit for the child. When the child is 18 or more years of age, they may apply to become a Turkish citizen by choice. If you or your spouse or partner becomes a Turkish citizen through the Citizenship by Investment Program, your children may also become Turkish citizens. If One or Both Parents is a Turkish Citizen If you or your spouse or partner is a Turkish citizen, the child is legally considered to be a Turkish citizen from the day of their birth, whether they're born in Turkey or not, and whether you or your spouse or partner are married or not. In this case, the citizenship procedure is merely a formality, and only requires proof that one or both parents are Turkish citizens. Turkish Citizenship Appointment If your child has at least one Turkish parent, you must make an appointment at the Nüfus ve Vatandaşlık İşleri Genel Müdürlüğü (Population and Citizenship Affairs Directorate, or Nüfus). You can book an appointment here: https://randevu.nvi.gov.tr/. Required Documents Typically, you'll need the following documents for the child: Application form (VAT-2), downloadable from https://www.nvi.gov.tr/hizmetlerimiz/vatandaslik-hizmetleri/vatandaslik-formlari Birth certificate Parents' identification documents The VAT-2 form is in 2 parts. The first part is the part you fill in, and the second includes the required documents and instructions. To learn how to get a copy of a birth certificate in Turkey, see How to Get a Copy of a Turkish Birth Certificate. Applying for a Turkish Passport While you're at your appointment, you can also apply for a passport for your child. He or she will need this to travel outside of Turkey and return. Dual Citizenship Turkey has no laws which prohibit dual citizenship. However, some other countries do. So, before you apply for Turkish citizenship, you should check the laws of your own country first. To learn more about dual citizenship, see Dual Citizenship Rules. Name Changes You won't be required to change your name to a Turkish one, but you can adopt a Turkish name if you want one. To learn more about the name rules, see Rules for non-Turkish names. Turkish Citizenship Law Turkish Citizenship Law is the Turkish Nationality Act No. 5901 as amended. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He's now retired and living in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
  14. After filling the form that I got from here of exceptional citizenship, to which address should I send it to? Or how should a deliver the application to the government?
  15. I have been living without interruption in Turkey for around 5 1/2 yrs, the first 4 years with a work residence permit and the last 1 1/2 yrs with a family residence permit (presently not employed and married to a Turkish). Am I eligible for Turkish citizenship?
  16. I wonder how can i get Turkish citizenship? and in what ways? is there a programme for foreigners to get citizenship? I saw a lot of information on web and my mind a little confused. I'm Austrian and i'd like to start a business in Turkey. could u please give me some information about those?
  17. Hi everyoneI've asked this question to a number of lawyers/judges and no one seems to be able to give me a definite answer. In June 2013 I will have been in Turkey for 5 years. The first 3.5 years were on the 90 day visa, which I obviously renewed as necessary. Since the 90/180 rule came in, i've been on a long term tourist visa which expires next month. After that I intend to apply for the normal residence permit, for a year or so. Does the 5 year residence requirement for citizenship include time spent on a tourist visa, or do they only count the years where you have stayed with a residence permit? There is no definition of "residence" in the act, and like I said I have't been able to get a uniform answer from the law talkin guys. Thanks for your help
  18. Hi Guys, Apparently, The Turkish Government has taken away the option for people with Turkish descent (Mother or Father) to get Turkish citizenship. When looking on consulate websites (like London) the option to get Turkish citizenship through a parent is missing. Plus i read on a website earlier that Turkey will no longer give citizenship to people with Turkish Descent. If this is true, then this will devastate me as i want to get Turkish Citizenship sometime in the future. Apparently, people like me won't be able to get it via a Turkish Parent if i am a citizen of another country. Again, if true...it's absolutely ridiculous! Regards, Selim
  19. What questions should l expect when l go to take a fingerprint scan? I'm on this stage now. Thursday 4th l go for interviews.
  20. If you get Turkish Citizenship will you get a reduction in the amount you pay the SGK?
  21. I have a short term residency based on owning a property here (not tourist, i think it's called real estate residency) and I'm living in Turkey most of the year. Lots of people are telling me that after 3-5 years of this type of residency you are eligible to apply for citizenship. I have also heard that it's NOT true so I keep getting mixed messages on this. I'm also about to start the process of getting a work permit here as well. So my questions are: 1. Does the "real estate" residency actually lead to citizenship? 2. If I get a work permit, does the period of "real estate" residency still count towards the 5 years (assuming it actually does lead to citizenship)?
  22. hi all, had anyone here got their citizenship through marriage in Istanbul? could you please give me a time line for what had happened e.g.: month-year: submitted paper month-year: finger prints followed by interview month-year: got a message asking to go get appointment with the Vali month-year: Vali interview month-year: got citizenship thank you in advance
  23. Love this forum. Does anyone know about the new Law on citizenship and $250k real estate investment. This means that if you invest at least $250,000 USD in real estate then you can get citizenship in 3-6 months. Anyone knows anything? Is this a new scam?
  24. Hullo! Can I participate in the investment program to purchase a home while I am in Turkey to benefit from citizenship through investment program? I am curious if it works while on an RP.
  25. Hey all, I'm 23 years old and a US Citizen, my father is a Turkish citizen and my mother is a foreigner. Both of them never got married and my birth was never registered in Turkey. My family in Turkey says that getting Turkish citizenship in Turkey is much easier since the embassy is giving me a hard time. Anyone know the process I would have to follow? I'm guessing I would have to register my birth? Thanks all!
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