Vegasturk

Member
  • Content Count

    7
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Vegasturk

  • Rank
    Bob Abi

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
  • Nationality
  1. When the strike began, we all assumed it would be a normal strike situation like in the states. It would be annoying but peaceful; man were we wrong. On base, the tactical dining facility set up to feed over 1500 military on base without kitchen units was vandalized the first night. The TAF commander refused to allow repairs, so we had no way to feed these people. Due to threats made to our people in the alley, it was off limits since the first day. When a man was followed to Adana on the second day of the strike and beaten up in front of his family, Adana was off-limits. People then tried to order food from the alley restaurants and brought on base by taxi; only to have the taxi stopped by forces unknown and ground glass put in their food. So ordering food off base was stopped. The BX, commissary and Shopette were all closed as any facility that wasn't mission essential and had Turkish worker striking there were not allowed to open. So there wasn't anyway to buy food on base. Additionally, air conditioning units and emergency generators all over the base were also being vandalized. This was just by day two of the strike. I have no problem with workers striking, but when they break the law and threaten children with harm and attempt to cut off all attempts to feed our people; this is war. I could go on for pages about the strike, but I would bore most of the readers to this site. The strike ended at after almost three months and they accepted basically the same terms offered the first day. Most of the workers didn't want to strike, as they were stuck outside at their assigned post in the hot/humid Adana summer weather. The more radical members of the union were easy to identify and were fired afterwards for breaking the law.
  2. The Red Onion never completely recovered from the strike of 1998. As the restaurant was right across from the main gate to the base, the union made it their strike headquarters. One of their classier actions was to throw eggs at the DODDs teachers returning for the first day of school. To be fair, it was never proved the union members did this, just like all the other "misfortunes" that happened during this time. Those of us that lived through the strike boycotted the restaurant since and told all newcomers about their role in it.
  3. Vegasturk

    Turkey Quiz

    I just completed this quiz. My Score was 86/100 and my time was 319 seconds  
  4. Vegasturk

    Early 70's In Izmir

    Yes the Eko pub was there in the early eighties, however, I didn't frequent it until the nineties. Our haunt was the Kaylon pub across the street. As for reading Scotch and Holy Water, we all read it, in fact my daughter has my copy now. In the early 80s, many of the stories in the book I could relate to, even though over 20 years had pasted.
  5. Vegasturk

    Early 70's In Izmir

    What a small world, from 87 to 90 while assigned to JSSG (later JSG) I lived at Talatpasa Blvd 45/5. The car dealer lot next to the apartment building was turned into a 8 story building in late 1989. I first came to Izmir in 1982 as a 21 year old E-3, over the next 20 years I spend almost 16 years stationed in Turkey, finally retiring as an E-8 in 2002 from Incirlik AB, Adana. Like most old timers I have many stories about Izmir and Turkey and how it has been transformed over the last 35 years. If I won't be boring folks, I'd be happy to talk about the "old" days.
  6. Vegasturk

    Travel for Dual Citizenship

    Greetings, my wife is a dual US/Turkish citizen. She hasn't had a Turkish passport in years. At passport control, she goes to the Turkish Citizen section and shows her US Passport with her nufus card. All her friends do that also. Hope this helps.