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Ken Grubb

Antalya
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Ken Grubb last won the day on September 6

Ken Grubb had the most liked content!

About Ken Grubb

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    Male
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    Antalya
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    Ancient history, Turkey, science.

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  1. Hey, that's a nice car! And in white... I would assume that would reflect a lot of that hot Mersin sun and keep you cooler. Not to mention making it easier to see by other drivers at night, which is always a good idea!
  2. An apostille is an internationally-recognized certification attached to a government-issued public document. It can also be a stamp or seal on the document itself. An apostille makes the document it's attached to legal for use in Turkey and in any other country which has signed the international apostille convention. The Apostille Convention The Apostille Convention (Hague Convention of 5 October 1961 Abolishing the Requirement of Legalisation for Foreign Public Documents) established an agreed-upon, standard way of legalizing documents between countries. It also required each country to designate one or more "competent authorities," as the convention calls them, to issue apostilles.You'll find a list of participating countries on the Hague Conference on Private International Law website. What To Do If Your Country Isn't On the List If your country isn't on the list, then it isn't participating in the Apostille Convention, and you'll have to contact your country's embassy, consulate, or foreign ministry for instructions on how to legalize your document. And you can go directly to "Step 3: Get the Document and the Apostille Translated." The 3-Step Legalization and Translation Process Step 1: Learn Who the Competent Authority Is and How to Send Documents to Them Go to the list of competent authorities here: HCCH Authorities (per Party) Find your country on the list, and click on the link which has the words "Competent Authority (Article 6)." That will take you to a page which explains how to contact the competent authority, including a link to a website which should give you information about where to send your document, what the fee is, and how much time it will take. Note: There may be one, or more, competent authorities for each country. For example, in the UK the competent authority is the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), while each of the UK's overseas territories each has its own. In the USA, each state has its own competent authority, and so does the federal government in Washington, DC). Step 2: Send Your Documents Create a cover letter which includes your e-mail address and telephone number, as well as your return address, the name of the document you are sending and its date and document number. Send the cover letter and document by registered mail or cargo delivery service to the address listed on the competent authority's website. What the Competent Authority Does Each competent authority has a file containing the signatures of government employees who are authorized to issue public documents. After receiving your document, they'll check the signature on the document against their signature exemplars. If everything is okay, they'll attach the apostille to your document (or stamp or place a seal on it), and send it back to you. How Much it Costs and How Long it Takes Each competent authority has its own fees, so the cost will vary. The time it takes will also vary according to your choice of delivery method. But once it gets to the competent authority, turnaround time is usually just one or two business days. Step 3: Get the Document and the Apostille Translated After you receive the document with its apostille (or other legalizing document if your country isn't part of the convention), both must be translated into Turkish by a yeminli çevirmen (sworn translator). The translator will then have the translation notarized. For a typical document, this might take as little as one or two hours. Your Foreign Document is Now Legal in Turkey You can now give your document to the Turkish authorities and it will be accepted. It is now as legal in Turkey as it is in your home country. Important!: The notary will stamp both the original document, the apostille, and the translation on the back with his or her stamp. That stamp will include a document number. Photograph or write that number down and keep it for your files. If later you need those same translated and notarized documents, you can simply take that number back to the same notary and ask them to pull it from their files. It will be a lot cheaper than going through the whole process again. Finding a Sworn Translator The Yeminli Çevirmenlik Federasyonu (TURÇEF, or in English, Federation of Sworn Translators) Has a website here: https://www.turcef.net/ At the bottom of the home page is a menu of the regions of Turkey. You can use this to find a listing of sworn translators for your area, which include their contact information and the languages they are authorized to translate to and from. Another way to find a translator is to find a notary first. Noters work with a specific group of translators who have offices nearby. Finding a Notary You can find all notaries public in Turkey here: http://www.tumnoterler.com/ You can also just walk around the center of town and look for their signs. A Note on Private Companies which Arrange Apostilles There are numerous private companies which charge for getting an apostille for your document. They are not "competent authorities" under the Apostille Convention. They simply do everything that I have written above, which you could just as easily do, and charge you for it. Questions? If you have any questions about apostilles or other legal issues, please post them in our Turkish Law Forum.
  3. Congratulations, Pete! I'll be buying a car next year (saving my money now), so I'll go through that process as well. I hope it's okay to send you a PM or two about it.
  4. That article is currently being re-written. The information about the ID card is old. Thanks for noticing that, I have removed the part about the landlord's ID card. You should only need a notarized copy of the rental contract. In Istanbul, the immigration specialists may also ask for a copy of the tapu (property title deed) of the owner of the place you are living, but that depends on the foreigner involved and the immigration specialist. In my case in Antalya, every year, the only thing I provide is a notarized copy of my rental agreement, and that is all. There is one other thing in that article which was outdated (and has been changed). There is no need for you to go to the Nüfus ve Vatandaşlık İşlleri Genel Müdürlüğü (Directorate of Population and Citizenship Affairs, or Nüfus). It used to be that foreigners also had to register themselves at their address in a separate process. This is no longer necessary, since the immigration specialist handling your application will enter you into the Nüfus central address registry at the address on your rental contract. Also, when you extend your residence permit, there is also no longer any need to go to the Nüfus and get an address verification document. Farris I apologize for that outdated information being there... I am re-writing all of the articles right now to improve and update them. But thank you for catching that problem, both of the above issues have been corrected in the article.
  5. Fada, I'd also recommend you join the main Turkish government portal, called E-Devlet, at www.turkiye.gov.tr. You just need to go to a local PTT (post office) with your mobile phone and your residence permit, also your passport. Then tell them you need a password for E-Devlet. They'll set you up right there and a temporary password will be sent to your mobile phone. Then you can change it and log in. It has a huge amount of helpful information. One of them is the ability to check any tax debts you have, and also an option to pay them online, here: https://www.turkiye.gov.tr/gib-vergi-borcu-sorgu Of course when you go to that link now you will need your password to log in. Once you get the password use that link and you'll be able to see all of the taxes you owe.
  6. It's not in the current citizenship law. The only way you can become a Turkish citizen by descent is if you have either a mother or father who is a Turk by birth. I haven't heard of any laws being passed giving citizenship to people in countries of the former Ottoman Empire, and I don't see any reason why they would do that. So it sounds like just a rumor to me.
  7. If it's savings, I'll repeat what Redders has recommended in his files in Doc Martin's Surgery for Expats. Take the amount of savings and divide it by 12, and you can offer that monthly amount for what you will have to live on. And if it is savings, you can't just put a lot of money into an account. Unfortunately a lot of people did that by borrowing the money, getting their permit, then taking the money out and repaying the loan. Then, having no money to live on, they went to work illegally. So the Directorate General of Migration Management (DGMM) is going to want to make sure the money you say you have is really yours, and they're going to want to see where it came from. At minimum you're going to need to have the last six months of your bank account statements showing the deposits and withdrawals. It doesn't have to be from a Turkish bank account. A regular copy of this is enough. Take that to your appointment. If they want more documentation, they will tell you either by SMS message before your appointment, or during your appointment. Other things they might want to see is a letter from an employer, or from your bank. If they do ask for additional documentation, they will give you time to get it.
  8. I seriously doubt it. But you can always ask. The international phone number for the 157 helpline is +90 312 157 1122. Yes. Since your current residence permit is expired, you would have to get a short-term residence permit as a first-time applicant. Then you can transfer to a family residence permit.
  9. What form was that? Was it a rental contract? Look on that document for an expiration date. You're legal in Turkey until that date or until your residence permit card comes. The expiration date should be 90 days after your appointment date. If the police came and got what they needed and left, then you are probably okay. But you could go to the Göç İdaresi and ask to see the immigration specialist who handled your application to see what happened. You don't need an appointment. If you do that, I hope you'll let us know what the problem was. Although it isn't very clear, the YellAli article is referring here to people who are cancelling their residence permit, not to someone who has received less time than they paid for. You can still get a refund, though, with the advice from that article, because it still works the same way. Just take your application, your residence permit card, and your tax receipts to show that you paid for two years and only got one year, for example. As I understand it, they will only refund with a payment into a Turkish bank account. But you could always ask!
  10. You can get a refund. You just need to take your application, your tax receipts and your residence permit to tax office and fill out a claim form. They will refund the payment for the year you didn't get. They only pay it in to a Turkish bank account, so you'll need to have one.I don't know of anybody who's done it but that's the procedure.
  11. This is a tutorial published by the Göç İdaresi Genel Müdürlüğü (Directorate General of Migration Management, or DGMM). It shows how to use the residence permit application website at https://e-ikamet.goc.gov.tr/ to apply for a short-term residence permit in Turkey. This video is the first in a short series of step-by-step videos explaining the whole process, so watch this first video to the end and the next one will start automatically.
  12. This is a tutorial published by the Göç İdaresi Genel Müdürlüğü (Directorate General of Migration Management, or DGMM). It shows how to use the residence permit application website at https://e-ikamet.goc.gov.tr/ to extend a short-term residence permit in Turkey. This video is the first in a short series of step-by-step videos explaining the whole process, so watch this first video to the end and the next one will start automatically.
  13. This is a tutorial published by the Göç İdaresi Genel Müdürlüğü (Directorate General of Migration Management, or DGMM). It shows how to use the residence permit application website at https://e-ikamet.goc.gov.tr/ to apply for a family residence permit in Turkey. This video is the first in a short series of step-by-step videos explaining the whole process, so watch this first video to the end and the next one will start automatically.
  14. This is a tutorial published by the Göç İdaresi Genel Müdürlüğü (Directorate General of Migration Management, or DGMM). It shows how to use the residence permit application website at https://e-ikamet.goc.gov.tr/ to extend a family residence permit in Turkey. This video is the first in a short series of step-by-step videos explaining the whole process, so watch this first video to the end and the next one will start automatically.
  15. This is a tutorial published by the Göç İdaresi Genel Müdürlüğü (Directorate General of Migration Management, or DGMM). It shows how to use the residence permit application website at https://e-ikamet.goc.gov.tr/ to apply for a student residence permit to live as a student Turkey. This video is the first in a short series of step-by-step videos explaining the whole process, so watch this first video to the end and the next one will start automatically.
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