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cayaholic

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Everything posted by cayaholic

  1. Being American (albeit with a Turkish background) will win you lots of brownie points with some Turkish girls. I know a lot of foreign guys in Turkey who married beautiful, lovely Turkish girls and had none of those houses/cars pointed out as essential before. You're young, right? Why be so fixated on finding a Turkish girl? If you want to come and stay here for a while, come, work, study (maybe you could study here?), make friends, improve your Turkish and if you happen to meet someone, then great. If not, you can have a great time anyway.
  2. I really couldn't agree less. In the UK there are so many facilities for children - great libraries, parent and toddler groups, sure start centres, free nursery places, cheap council swimming pools and wonderful free museums with special events for children. I see very little evidence of such things in Turkey apart from expensive sessions for the middle/upper classes. Government health care in Turkey is nowhere near as good as the NHS. Private is a different matter of course.
  3. Yes he can but be aware of the implications of that - ie military service obligation.
  4. I have several friends who had bad experiences with that company and have read numerous complaints about them all over facebook. I would recommend the original poster gets a job directly with a school without using any organisation that will cream off part of the monthly salary.
  5. Teach to Travel is not a company with a good reputation. Do you have experience and qualifications? If so, I would not use them to get a job.
  6. It's going to be really hard...she might be able to get a tourist visa but even those are hard to come by. Being an English teacher won't help much, even if her English is completely fluent - there are already plenty of qualified teachers in the UK not even including all those from the EU who are allowed to work there. Sorry not meaning to put you off, just being realistic. I know many couples, even married ones with children, who live in Turkey because it's become so difficult for people who aren't from the EU to move there.
  7. Yes, it totally depends where he is. Ask him in a roundabout way.
  8. I have no idea about the nutritionist thing but it's hard for foreigners to work here. Private schools are very expensive but government schools are seriously lacking in facilities. There are areas in every city which are more conservative than others and cities which are considered more conservative than others. So really you should choose a city and then narrow down the neighbourhoods. This sounds like a really huge move for you. I'm not sure I would do it myself with young children - do you know that many middle class Turks would love their children to have the opportunity to
  9. Well it can vary a lot depending on your expectations and your job. Most jobs provide free transport and lunch. Public transport is cheap anyway. You can eat very cheaply if you buy food that's in season and don't have meat every day. However, if you prefer to eat non Turkish food or imported food, it will be expensive. I have no idea about the job. It's not easy for companies to hire foreigners.
  10. Yes that is plenty. It's more than double what the average person in Turkey earns. Rent starts from 1000, going up to many times that.
  11. The whole facebook thing would really put me off. There are lots of Turkish guys who have multiple facebook accounts and it's nearly always related to having different girlfriends and playing them all. I mean I wish you all the best but what future do you actually see for this relationship? He's not going to be able to move to the UK. Are you considering moving there? Are you in education?
  12. Where do you really expect this relationship to go? Butterflies are really powerful, even more so when you're on holiday and it's more exciting, but sometimes it's best to leave it at that. I don't mean to be negative but it's hard enough to make any relationship work, but when you're in different countries it's even worse. As a Turk he's not going to be able to come to the UK easily, and do you really want to give up your life to go there? I know some girls do do that, but it always makes me sad...back in the UK, they could be getting higher education, learning skills, basically enjoy bei
  13. I find that rather a rude term and just because someone lives in a village, doesn't mean they would expect a gift. I have visited people in a village and while I did take some play dough for the children to play with, nothing extravagant, and their hospitality was amazing. They actually gave me gifts and made the most delicious food for my friend and I.
  14. I don't know. I would have thought so, if they're going to government schools. Is their father not the Turkish fiance? If he is, it will be easy to get them citizenship. What sort of job do you want to do? If you have the qualifications to work as a teacher, and you got a job at a private school, some of them allow your children to attend for free, or at least for a discounted price.
  15. Do your children have Turkish citizenship? Turkish state schools really lack a lot of things, I'd recommend taking extra educational materials over with you such as English books or maybe even some stuff from the national curriculum. Children don't start school until they're 6 or 7 in Turkey.
  16. You haven't met him, yet he's your boyfriend? Isn't that a little strange?
  17. I'm glad Ram benefited from some good advice and Ken, I really appreciate your comments. So unusual these days as many people seem to enjoy arguing on the internet. Of course everyone has had their own experiences, myself included, but I get fed up of hearing over generalisations about people from the East of Turkey.
  18. I wish you luck ram. Personally, I'd stay away. The market is saturated in places like Kusadasi and it's hard to be successful. Ken I found your comments rather rude. Ok, some of the seasonal workers are problematic, but many of them work incredibly hard for very low wages, while living in pitiful conditions provided by their boss. Many "typical" Turks (I'm thinking of my ex here), on the contrary, would be too stuck up to lower themselves to waiting tables or work seven days a week, even if they are students or unemployed.
  19. Go and enjoy your holiday and try to forget him. I have known many Turkish guys who have more than one facebook and it is a big warning signal for me. They might have facebooks for different girls, or one for their family and one for their friends (not really necessary as you can use filters/groups) or one for friends and one for girls. In any case, it's not really the sign of a mature and reliable person.
  20. What a story! Your ex sounds awful so you're well shot of him. I wish you luck with your new boyfriend, I think you're going to need it. I don't mean to sound funny but do you ever wonder whether the way you got together will cause you issues in the future? I mean with him possibly not trusting you.
  21. I was in the airport a few days ago and saw a little dog walking around, so yes, it's possible
  22. I don't know how you expect strangers on a forum to predict whether your marriage will last. You know better than us. Do you love each other? Are you willing to adapt to life in the UK, or are you going to expect things to be the same as in Turkey?
  23. I think if you want to make friends in a foreign country you should be more open to being friends with people of different ages and backgrounds. Back in my home country, my friends tended to be the same age as me as we had met at school, university or our first job after graduating. Since moving to Turkey, however, I have made friends who are up to 60 years old. If we both speak English and get on, why not? I've found it really rewarding to have older friends. Good luck!
  24. I don't think so. Didim doesn't have such a high hill as in the second photo.
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