Jump to content

Fil

Member
  • Posts

    1,270
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    54
  • Country

    Turkey

Reputation Activity

  1. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in ESL/EFL Teacher in Turkey   
    You are well qualified for working in Turkey and you should have a good choice of jobs available.
    Your options are:
    University prep school
    Private High School
    Private primary or secondary school or even kindergarten.
    I think most people would say the university prep schools provide the best positions. They have been shedding foreign staff recently because of employment restrictions and  a new requirement for all prep school teachers to have a masters degree, which you have so great.
    Take a look around the istanbul univerisities to see who is recruiting. They all have websites in Turkish and English with vacancies listed. The best private universities in istanbul are koç and sabancı. There are many others of varying quality. There may be websites or forums that carry current vacancies, but I am not aware of any at the moment. There are many facebook forums for English teachers, greenlist, blackist etc
    You will find lots of job offers from different places, be selective, there are massive differences in the quality of education and management at different institutions.
    I teach in a state univeristy ELL department by the way.
    For this term all university classes are online. Depending on the pandemic situation that may or may not change when the second terms starts in February.
    Good luck in your search, best wishes, Fil
     
  2. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from IbrahimAbi in ESL/EFL Teacher in Turkey   
    You are well qualified for working in Turkey and you should have a good choice of jobs available.
    Your options are:
    University prep school
    Private High School
    Private primary or secondary school or even kindergarten.
    I think most people would say the university prep schools provide the best positions. They have been shedding foreign staff recently because of employment restrictions and  a new requirement for all prep school teachers to have a masters degree, which you have so great.
    Take a look around the istanbul univerisities to see who is recruiting. They all have websites in Turkish and English with vacancies listed. The best private universities in istanbul are koç and sabancı. There are many others of varying quality. There may be websites or forums that carry current vacancies, but I am not aware of any at the moment. There are many facebook forums for English teachers, greenlist, blackist etc
    You will find lots of job offers from different places, be selective, there are massive differences in the quality of education and management at different institutions.
    I teach in a state univeristy ELL department by the way.
    For this term all university classes are online. Depending on the pandemic situation that may or may not change when the second terms starts in February.
    Good luck in your search, best wishes, Fil
     
  3. Like
    Fil got a reaction from Karam in Private schooling costs in Fethiye region   
    Children start year one at 6-6. 1/2. Children aged five get registered in school but usually get sent to the anasinif (kindergarten class). Parents can choose a private kindergarten if they want. Statistics show that children who start when they are older tend to be more successful so it is better to delay starting. It would give you more time to get the reading started.
    Classes are big in state schools. Can be up to fifty.
    Qualifications well it is not true to say they are useless but it is not certain they are full equivalents. Individual cases vary. A university degree is a degree. But it is likely to be desirable career wise to do further study. I know of people who have taught in UK with Turkish certification, but a pgce on top would be better.
    If you are on good terms with the teacher and head they won't be fussy about attendance at all.
    It is important to find out as much as possible about the class teachers practices you need to ask around. Good teachers usually have the biggest classes.
    Think about all the nice kind decent people you know in Turkey. They have all been through the Turkish education system. The good doctors, bank staff, technicians etc. And you should be confident that you know or can learn enough to manage situations to your children's benefit.
  4. Like
    Fil got a reaction from Karam in Private schooling costs in Fethiye region   
    Private schools will set you back 10000TL to 35000TL a year for your older daughter. The younger one is kindergarten age, that will be 450TL per month up to 1000TL per month.
     
    Whether you choose state or private you will need to provide a lot of back-up and additional support.
     
    Speaking personally I do not think the private schools provide anything like value for money. The teachers are the same as in state schools. The curriculum is the same. The private schools' main selling point is teaching English, which presumably yours already have, so they will be wasting their time for 12 lessons a week. All you get for the extra money is cleaner toilets and facilities and smaller classes. We preferred to spend spare cash on educational support for the children, not on school fees.
     
    I feel that foreign parents are better off considering state school, home schooling or a combination of state and home schooling. At least state school will provide good opportunities for learning Turkish and meeting people.
    If your children have a Turkish parent then home schooling is probably not an option.
    If your stay is long-term and your children might want to attend university and work in Turkey, then state school is probably preferable.
    If your stay is short-term and the children will need to rejoin another education system later on, then home schooling is probably the best option.
     
    Our children went all through state school from start to finish, one is now at university in Ankara and the other starts university next year. It was quite tough for them (and their parents) at times, but they have gained excellent skills in writing and speaking Turkish, which couldn't really have been done without going through Turkish education. I also suspect their maths is better in Turkey than it would have been in UK, although there is no way of knowing for sure. And I think the gender stereotyping concerning subjects is worse in UK than in Turkey. Although not by that much, and both have ended up choosing languages at university (like their father), but at least they were not heavily channeled in that direction by the schools from age 14.
     
    If children have good Turkish language skills to start off with, then the shool experiences are less difficult. But it is never easy anywhere to be different, particularly for children. It also seems to be somewhat tougher for boys than for girls.
     
    You have a difficult decision, and it will never be easy, but try to focus on the many positive aspects, the unique experiences, the language skills, the insights into different types of people. It is important for parents to be very supportive, encouraging and flexible. Establish good channels of communication and keep them open no matter what, keep calm, don't get angry whatever happens. Help and encourage with homework, but don't let it get you or your child down. many teachers set too much homework, most of it pointless and intended to keep the children off the streets.
     
    Good luck.
  5. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Best IELTS Preparation Course in Antalya   
    You don't need a teacher for ielts, just go to their website, get to know what activities are in the exam and do the sample questions on the website.
    https://www.ielts.org/
    https://www.cambridgeenglish.org/exams-and-tests/ielts/
    If you want more practice questions there are plenty for sale online. That is a much more cost-effective way to take ielts.
  6. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Turkish Pensions for Foreign Employees   
    As far as I can see from various internet sources foreigners can receive sgk pensions.
    For example:
    https://www.dunya.com/kose-yazisi/yabancilar-da-emekli-olabilir-mi/381724 http://www.lebibyalkin.com.tr/mevzuat/haberler/2017/yabancilar-da-emekli-olabilir-mi.html http://www.resulkurt.com/?artikel,11068/yabanci-uyruklu-calisan-turkiyede-emekli-olabilir-mi/sezgin-ozcan http://www.sadettinorhan.net/yabanci_sosyal_guvenlik.html They all say more or less this, that foreigners now have the same rights as Turkish citizens in this respect.
    Sosyal güvenlik hakkından, yabancı çalışanların faydalanıp faydalanmayacağı konusunda bazen tereddüt yaşandığı görünüyor. Oysa ki hem Türk hem de yabancı çalışanlar için sosyal güvenlik hakkı anayasal bir hak olarak güvence altına alınmıştır. Bunun doğal sonucu olarak emeklilik açısından yabancı uyruklu kişilerin Türk uyruklulardan farkı olmadığından yeterli prim ödemesi varsa ve yaşı tamamlamışsa emekli olma hakkı olacaktır.
  7. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from IbrahimAbi in Turkish Pensions for Foreign Employees   
    In theory it is possible to see all your sgk contributions through edevlet.
  8. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in International School in English   
    There aren't any English-medium schools in Antalya. Private schools have a large number of English lessons (12 or more) but all the other lessons are taught in Turkish.
    Your child is young enough to learn Turkish really well, whichever school they attend.
    State schools can be quite a tough prospect depending on the area.
    Your child will encounter prejudice, coping has a lot to do with personality, reactions will vary a lot from great warmth and friendliness to hostitlity. Private schools may be more capable (but maybe not more willing) to deal with that.
    In my opinion none of the private schools in Antalya offer value for money.
  9. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Vocational school associate degree?   
    Associate degrees are vocational qualifications. There are currently two and a half million students taking associate degrees, including my daughter.  
    Associate degrees are the qualification held by many staff in hotels and catering, hospitals, kindergartens, government offices and many other places.
    Associate degrees require lower scores in the university exam than 4-year degrees.
    If you are not a Turkish citizen, I can't think of any reason why you would want such a degree, as the jobs they lead to are done by Turkish people and are not open to foreigners.
  10. Like
    Fil got a reaction from Star in Interest Rates, Inflation, and Investments in Turkey   
    It is internet banking so nothing to do with the branch. If you want proof that the money is where you put it you should be able to get a dekont for the initial transaction and some kind of a printout for the account balance. 
  11. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in 10 Romantic Things To Do In Istanbul   
    Oh, I beg to differ. Nothing could be more romantic than the unique atmosphere of the bars on the Galata Bridge. I don't mean the expensive restaurants on the side that faces the Bosphorous, I mean the other side that looks up the Golden Horn, which is mainly bars. Great for sundowners, the pollution creates amazing red and purple and violet sunsets as the sun sinks behind the Mosques of Suleyman and Selim, February or March the ideal time for a tryst there, huddling together for warmth whilst savouring the view and the smell of charcoal and burning rubber. In the old days the bridge used to shudder and judder as the lorries and buses went over the joints of the parts that went up and down.
  12. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Istanbul Metro Bus Advice   
    here are some good tips about travelling by metrobus in istanbul from some helpful local chaps.
  13. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Vegetarianism And Yoga In Istanbul   
    Ortaköy, great, one of my old haunts. Supper in the Çınar altı restaurant, then on to one of the live music bars, I fell down the stairs on the way out once. I hope Ortaköy is still fun. And as for Taksim, late night ayran and döner, dodging the sleazy geezers trying to show me pictures of their 'sister'. Those were the days. Have you considered that a yoga course in Turkish would be a very good way to learn the language? Good luck with it all.
  14. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Istanbul 1964   
    There is a series of excellent short French films in black and white showing istanbul in 1964 on facebook and youtube, not sure how to guide you to them, maybe this link will work, maybe not. But they are definitely worth locating. See those green Bosphorous hillsides, the caiques, the people...
  15. Like
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Visiting Cemeteries in Istanbul   
    There are lots of interesting cemeteries all over istanbul. Try to get a copy of Strolling through Istanbul by Freely and Sumner-Boyd, describes everything in fantastic detail. As I recall chapter 17 on the Land Walls gives a lot of interesting info about the cemeteries you pass.
    I think there are a couple of very large and interesting cemeteries, on Rum, one Jewish, by Belgrade Gate. The Church connected to the Greek one is also interesting, make sure you go down to the crypt where there is an ayazma (Spring) with fish swimming in the pool. The graves from late Ottoman times have the photos of the occupants engraved on the stone.
  16. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Summer Destinations From Istanbul   
    Assos seems very popular with the istanbul people. I went there once, it was pretty swish. Relatives have been to Marmara island and Erdek, I haven't been there, may be a bit down market, but I think there's a ferry from istanbul. Or how about the beach at Kilyos or Şile?
  17. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in City center from Istanbul Ataturk airport   
    For future journeys, it would have been better to arrive at the other airport, Sabiha Gökçen, as Tuzla is close to that airport. Tuzla is a long way from Taksim.
    If you want to travel as cheaply as possible from Ataturk airport it should be possible to get to Tuzla by public transport, but I'm afraid I don't know the way. There is the metro from the airport of course, maybe to Yenikapı, then I think you need the new marmaray and transfer to the Kadıköy to Pendik metro line. But you need to ask someone who is more familiar with istanbul travel.
    You can find information about the public transport system in istanbul from iett, http://www.iett.istanbul/en
  18. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in City center from Istanbul Ataturk airport   
    According to taxifarefinder.com the fare from taksim to tuzla is 111TL (43kms 44 minutes) and from Ataturk airport 152TL (59 kms and 54 minutes).
  19. Like
    Fil got a reaction from Star in City center from Istanbul Ataturk airport   
    According to taxifarefinder.com the fare from taksim to tuzla is 111TL (43kms 44 minutes) and from Ataturk airport 152TL (59 kms and 54 minutes).
  20. Like
    Fil got a reaction from Star in City center from Istanbul Ataturk airport   
    For future journeys, it would have been better to arrive at the other airport, Sabiha Gökçen, as Tuzla is close to that airport. Tuzla is a long way from Taksim.
    If you want to travel as cheaply as possible from Ataturk airport it should be possible to get to Tuzla by public transport, but I'm afraid I don't know the way. There is the metro from the airport of course, maybe to Yenikapı, then I think you need the new marmaray and transfer to the Kadıköy to Pendik metro line. But you need to ask someone who is more familiar with istanbul travel.
    You can find information about the public transport system in istanbul from iett, http://www.iett.istanbul/en
  21. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Renouncing Foreign Citizenship for Turkish University Entrance Examination   
    Also there is or at least used to be something called a blue (might be another colour) card which records the individual as having many of the rights of a Turkish citizen (residence, education, health) and full citizenship can be restored. I am not sure if this still applies. Meral is the one who knows all about this.
    When my older daughter was at school the teachers had all kinds of weird ideas and assumptions concerning here rights as a foreign citizen. Some thought that foreigners had special advantages over Turks (totally incorrect) and others refused to see her as Turkish, despite the fact that she had attended school Turkey since 3rd grade.
  22. Thanks
    Fil got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Renouncing Foreign Citizenship for Turkish University Entrance Examination   
    Both my daughters went through the education system as dual citizens and were treated by the system the same way as single nationality citizens. One has just graduated from university and the other is in the first year. They took the ygs/lys same as the other students. There is a way into university as a foreigner taking the yös, but as far as I know it is only open to people who have had most of their primary and secondary education abroad.
    To enter university with yös students have to demonstrate some proficiency in Turkish, the level required is intermediate, not advanced.
    Has there been some miscommunication somewhere along the line, or the school head does not know the rules well enough?
  23. Like
    Fil got a reaction from Star in Are Jobs Without Insurance Legal?   
    I think you may have gained a false impression about tourists working. As far as I know, few tourists work and those that work in visible jobs, especially cafes and restaurants, are often picked up by the authorities quite quickly. There may be people on tourist visas working in less visible jobs such as in workshops or as day labourers. But if they have enough money to enable them to get a residence permit, why would they be working for little money?
    People who are refugees or are applying for that or have some permission to be in Turkey  other than a regular residence permit seem to have a different status and that may be how they are able to work.
    In general in Turkey the authorities are clamping down on the employment of people without insurance. Last year all work places were required to submit the names and tc numbers of all people working there. The fines for businesses employing unregistered staff, TC citizens and foreigners, are very high.
    Another interesting point, not relevant to the ilegals you are asking about, is that anyone who is entitled to work but does not have their sgk paid by the employer, or whose income declared by the employer is less that the actual amount, can complai to the sgk and the employer will have to pay up the rest of the amount and pay a large fine. 
  24. Like
    Fil got a reaction from IbrahimAbi in Turkey today   
    No it wasn't busy just us and our 24 children.
    Not being busy is another bonus. Just being in the cold air was like taking a long cold drink.
    And yes, I skated but unfortunately there is no photo of that because taking a selfy while skating was too wobbly.
  25. Like
    Fil got a reaction from FenerEniste in Turkey today   
    Temperature in Antalya below zero-
    in the new ice rink.
    Not far from the Meydan stop on the new tram.
    Çaybaşı Mahallesi, 1364. Sk., 07100 Muratpaşa/Antalya
     

×
×
  • Create New...