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canpak

Istanbul
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canpak last won the day on August 29 2017

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About canpak

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  1. I found this article which basically says women have the right to use their surname alone in Turkey (due to a supreme court case that sets precedent), but you need to file a suit. The registry office needs to follow the the law pertaining to surnames which hasn't been changed, so can only accept a women using her husband's surname or her maiden name followed by her husband's surname.Here's the article: http://www.turkeylawconsulting.com/corporate-individuals-law/married-women-in-turkey-may-use-their-maiden-name-without-husbands-surname-hereinafter/ On a side note, I had a professor in Turkey that got married. She attached her husbands first name onto her maiden name and filled out important or legal documents in that way, but in her personal and professional life she continued using her maiden name alone.
  2. Thank you everyone for the information and links. I have a feeling it won't be an issue. I recently got my Pakistani national identity card renewed and even though Pakistan doesn't allow for dual-citizenship, I'm still a Pakistani and Canadian citizen. I feel like this is a rule not many countries enforce. I don't think I have any restrictions on obtaining Turkish citizenship when the time comes, and it is highly unlikely Pakistan or Canada would force me to renounce citizenship.
  3. I've heard that Esenyurt is mostly a slum area, though there are some new developments there. Certainly budget friendly, but not the most convenient place to live. Many refugees have flocked to the area because of its low cost, but with any city that has a concentrated area of low income immigrants you see ghettofication and problems like poverty, limited education, and crime get compounded. You can see examples of the same phenomenon having occurred all across North America and Europe both in recent history and in the more distant past. It can take communities decades to push past this socio-economic phenomenon. Unless you work or study nearby, I would suggest not living in that area. I would even advise against having investment property over there (though it is tempting cause of the low prices), you won't get much on rental income and the value will not increase much in that area. Küçükçekmece is quite nice and close to the airport. Avcilar is next to that disctrict and also not too far from the airport. Avcilar is also not too overprice (cheaper than Küçükçekmece) and it's a really nice residential area with lots of parks and next to sea(Avcilar is way too underrated in my opinion). But if you're thinking of purchasing an apartment, keep in mind that airport will close down in about 11 years or less when the new airport is fully operational, and in those 11 years airlines will gradually transfer to new airport.
  4. Hello, My partner will be coming to Canada in a few months and we are debating as to whether it will be simpler to legally marry in Canada then register our marriage in Turkey afterward or wait until our actual wedding in Turkey and legally marry over there. I've looked up the marriage process in Turkey and it appears I will need to get my birth certificate sent back to Pakistan for authentication then get a notarized translation of that, a statement-in-lieu of notice which must also have a notarized translation (to prove I have no impediment to marry) from the government of Canada which additionally requires I provide a certified true copy of my citizenship card, landing document, and a statutory declaration to the Canadian government, medical check up results from a doctor in Turkey, passport and photocopy, and 6 passport sized photos. In Canada he and I just need to provide our passports as ID in order to get married, he has no extra requirement despite being a foreigner/visitor in Canada. What I'm curious about is if he and I legally marry in Canada (which seems so much simpler), what do we have to do when we go to Turkey to have our marriage legally registered there as well? What do we need to do to get our marriage recognized/registered in Turkey? He's a Turkish citizen and I have dual nationality in Canada and Pakistan if that provides any useful information. Also, since I'll be moving to Turkey I will need to apply for a family residence permit, so do I apply for that before getting our marriage recognized in Turkey, or after? Additionally, he will be going back to Turkey a year before I come there for the wedding. Would he need to register it as soon as he gets back? And if he does, do I need to take further action once I get there? I can't seem to find any information about this scenario in English online. If anyone can provide some information I would be grateful.
  5. Hello, I am wondering if anyone with dual citizenship has applied for a third Turkish citizenship and if you've run into any issues in doing so. I have both Canadian and Pakistani citizenship and am curious if there is anything important in the citizenship process I should know in regards to this fact.
  6. My fiance and I often talk about baby names. I grew up in Canada but I'm actually Pakistani so I really want our future children to have Pakistani names, especially since they will be raised in Turkey. I think it is important for them to carry with them something that reminds them of their Pakistani identity. Sadly some of the names I like have sounds the Turkish language doesn't have like the throaty "kh' growl sound and Ws But we've got a good 4-5 years before it's deciding time.
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