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saffron

Isparta
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  1. Like
    saffron got a reaction from sarafa in Whose Book Is It?   
    In a website on Turkish (Suffix Dictionary) I read an arguement that a word like 'kitabını' is ambiguous and the meaning can be drived only from the context. So I think the topic deserves attention..
    A word like 'kitabını' may be confusing basically for two reasons..
    Let me discuss them below:A dialogue:A-Please give me one of the books on the tableB- Whose book do you want?
    A- Your bookA- L
  2. Like
    saffron got a reaction from MrsD in 'dir' Versus 'olur'   
    To find a perfect counterpart for the verb 'to be' in Turkish is not always possible. This topic cannot be covered with a few examples I wrote below, but, on the occassion of the proverb about foolish horses, I tried to shed some light over the issue. Now let's examine the examples first:Bu elma yeşildir: This apple is green. Bu elma ekşidir: This apple is sour. All the green apples are sour: Bütün yeşil elmalar ekşidir: Ok, there is nothing wrong in this sentence, but Turkish speakers never say ‘bütün yeşil elmalar ekşidir’, but say ‘bütün yeşil elmalar ekşi olur’, instead. (Actually, instead of ‘bütün yeşil elmalar, they simply say ‘yeşil elma ekşi olur’, because ‘yeşil elma’ alone represents all the green apples, in this context, where we don’t indicate a certain apple among others. If we were indicating a certain apple, the sentence would be like that: The green apple is sour and the red apple is sweet: Yeşil elma ekşi, kırmızı elma tatlıdır. But when we mean all the green apples, ‘yeşil elma’ becomes a group name representing all the apples). Now we can take a closer look at the difference between ‘dir’ and ‘olur’: As I said, there is nothing wrong in ‘bütün yeşil elmalar ekşidir’. Probably this is the type of sentence we would meet in a book on logic: ‘dir’ is the shortest of way expressing a fact. This is that, period. However, when we use ‘olur’, we express the strong likelihood of something. This likelihood is so strong that, we consider it as a rule. The green apples are expected to be sour, by the rule of nature or any other rule. Actually the tense of the verb shows this likelihood: ‘Herhalde akşama kadar gelir’: I guess he will come by the evening. ‘Eğer bunu yere dökersen annen sana çok kızar’: If you pour it on the ground your mother will be very angry with you. (As you know this conjugation also corresponds to the simple present tense, though not always).
    Now we can compare ‘olur’ with alternatives in English. To some extent, it can be considered as ‘to be’, because I can translate the sentence ‘yeşil elma ekşi olur’ as ‘all the green apples are sour’. I can also use ‘become’ : all the green apples become sour’, because, thinking Turkishwise, ‘olur’ implies a process and the process includes a rule. Actually I prefer this one. But neither one of these alternatives offers a perfect solution, unless this point is kept in mind: ‘olur’ is, first of, an expression of strong likelihood.(Comparing 'olmak' with 'to happen' is another point of discussion)
  3. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Abi in A Letter Of Goodbye   
    You are all very welcome yes, I will try to keep in touch..
    By the way, I don't check my e-mail box often, but Ken has my telephone number, you can contact him, if you think I would be somehow helpful in an urgent/important situtaion..
  4. Like
    saffron got a reaction from gracealanya in Hi Aussie Muslim 40 Yr Female Here Im Married To 26 Yr Turkish Man But His Parents Dont Know Yet.   
    Hi Nikemre, welcome to our forum..
    I'm a Turkish member, and would like to tell you something clearly: If your husband is a kind of person that needs the approval of his family for his marriage, you can expect objections to be brought. Those objections may be based on various concerns, age is only one of them. If the family of your husband is one of those families that are expected to say 'your choice, your happiness, make your own decision' then ok, age or whatever doesnt matter. A third possibility is that your husband doesn't need the approval his family, but for the sake of politeness or respect pretends that he needs their approval. In this case both of the parties know that this is only formality.
    Shortly, not your age, only the cultural background of your husband matters here.
  5. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Vic801 in Translation Works For Advanced Learners   
    Sarı öküzün (or kır atın) yanında duran ya huyundan ya suyundan. This is an incomplete sentence. Further,a literal translation will not make any sense. What is meant here is that if you have a close cooperation or social contact with somebody, you may copy some of his-her features.
    Koyunun olmadığı yerde keçiye abdurrahman çelebi (denir). When no sheep is available around, a goat is called 'abdurrahman çelebi'. Çelebi is one of the former ways of addressing. What is meant is that, if there is no person qualified for some certain position/task etc, a second best is appreciated more than s/he deserves.
    Körler sağırlar birbirini ağırlar: Blind men and deaf men entertain each other: this is used when two parties or a group of people speak on an issue though they are not qualified to speak on the subject matter, yet justify each other's ignorance.
    Ok, let's turn back to proverbs that you can try to translate..
    Eşek ölür semeri kalır, insan ölür eseri kalır.
  6. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Abi in Hi Aussie Muslim 40 Yr Female Here Im Married To 26 Yr Turkish Man But His Parents Dont Know Yet.   
    Hi Nikemre, welcome to our forum..
    I'm a Turkish member, and would like to tell you something clearly: If your husband is a kind of person that needs the approval of his family for his marriage, you can expect objections to be brought. Those objections may be based on various concerns, age is only one of them. If the family of your husband is one of those families that are expected to say 'your choice, your happiness, make your own decision' then ok, age or whatever doesnt matter. A third possibility is that your husband doesn't need the approval his family, but for the sake of politeness or respect pretends that he needs their approval. In this case both of the parties know that this is only formality.
    Shortly, not your age, only the cultural background of your husband matters here.
  7. Like
    saffron got a reaction from IstanbulWhiteboy in Turkish Jokes   
    Temel was seriously ill. He had almost no hope to recover. One day she asked his wife, Fadime:-Fadime, will you marry again after I die?
    Fadime, thinking that she would make Temel happy if she says yes, nodded:-Yes, I will marry.- Will you love him too, as much as you love me?- (crying) yes, I will-Will you let him come home?-Yes-Will you cook delicious things for him, too?-Yes, my dear Temel-Will you cook mantı with garlic for him, too?-No. He doesn't like it.
  8. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Vic801 in Geliyorum, Geliyum, Gelim ?   
    This is a very detailed issue, but I think I can summarize it, to give a proper idea..
    First of all, there is a standard Turkish. The formal Turkish and standard Turkish overlap. But even if you talk in an informal way with a friend, you still observe the rules of standard Turkish.
    There are local dialects. As such, they cannot be considered as 'substandard' because, although these dialects don't correspond with formal Turkish, they have their own standards.
    So when you speak Turkish in an informal way, what you do is not using a dialect. Not using substandard Turkish either.
    But when a youngster says 'afandim' instead of 'efendim', this is simply substandard Turkish, a trend.
    So keeping this classification in mind, 'geliyorum' is standard, and you say 'geliyorum' whatever the degree of 'informality' you use. 'Geliyom' (not geliyum), on the other hand, is rural, and part of some local dialect. Sometimes, the users of standard Turkish, including me, can use it for fun. Likewise, youngsters sometime imitate local dialects, though they don't know much about them. But they simply enjoy the absurdity they create.
    I never heard someone saying 'gelim'. However, if it is 'geliyim/geliim/, then it is the quick form of 'geleyim':1- let me come2- a tense that can be explained only within a proper context, as the tenses of Turkish and English don't correspond on ever occassion.
    Geleyim is formal and standard, geliim is colloquial. Except for written Turkish you can freely use it. Both are ok, in speech.
    Unfortunately I forgot the tenses of French, which I had spent years to memorize their conjugations, incuding irregular verbs. If I had remembered, I could be able to compare them with Turkish for you..
  9. Like
    saffron got a reaction from REDDERS in Geliyorum, Geliyum, Gelim ?   
    This is a very detailed issue, but I think I can summarize it, to give a proper idea..
    First of all, there is a standard Turkish. The formal Turkish and standard Turkish overlap. But even if you talk in an informal way with a friend, you still observe the rules of standard Turkish.
    There are local dialects. As such, they cannot be considered as 'substandard' because, although these dialects don't correspond with formal Turkish, they have their own standards.
    So when you speak Turkish in an informal way, what you do is not using a dialect. Not using substandard Turkish either.
    But when a youngster says 'afandim' instead of 'efendim', this is simply substandard Turkish, a trend.
    So keeping this classification in mind, 'geliyorum' is standard, and you say 'geliyorum' whatever the degree of 'informality' you use. 'Geliyom' (not geliyum), on the other hand, is rural, and part of some local dialect. Sometimes, the users of standard Turkish, including me, can use it for fun. Likewise, youngsters sometime imitate local dialects, though they don't know much about them. But they simply enjoy the absurdity they create.
    I never heard someone saying 'gelim'. However, if it is 'geliyim/geliim/, then it is the quick form of 'geleyim':1- let me come2- a tense that can be explained only within a proper context, as the tenses of Turkish and English don't correspond on ever occassion.
    Geleyim is formal and standard, geliim is colloquial. Except for written Turkish you can freely use it. Both are ok, in speech.
    Unfortunately I forgot the tenses of French, which I had spent years to memorize their conjugations, incuding irregular verbs. If I had remembered, I could be able to compare them with Turkish for you..
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