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saffron

Isparta
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  1. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Tarhana: some kind of magick!   
    No, tarhana is never used as a spice. The powder is used to make a tarhana soup, with additon of water and oil or butter. 
    The restaurants trying to look attractive for tourists use different things like curry..
    Turkish food culture has no familiarity with curry, but now you can see it served with chicken. It is a soft orange powder, and tangy. 
    Sumak or rhus has a red or dark red colour. It has a sour taste, and is used together with or instead of lemmon in some salads. When you order kebap, and if it is served with sliced onions, those tiny red particles on the onion slices are sumak..
    Considering only its color, maybe kimyon (cumin) is a candidate, but Turks never use it with chicken..it is for red meat and some legumes like lentil.
     
  2. Like
    saffron got a reaction from greenstein in Tarhana: some kind of magick!   
    No, tarhana is never used as a spice. The powder is used to make a tarhana soup, with additon of water and oil or butter. 
    The restaurants trying to look attractive for tourists use different things like curry..
    Turkish food culture has no familiarity with curry, but now you can see it served with chicken. It is a soft orange powder, and tangy. 
    Sumak or rhus has a red or dark red colour. It has a sour taste, and is used together with or instead of lemmon in some salads. When you order kebap, and if it is served with sliced onions, those tiny red particles on the onion slices are sumak..
    Considering only its color, maybe kimyon (cumin) is a candidate, but Turks never use it with chicken..it is for red meat and some legumes like lentil.
     
  3. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Tarhana: some kind of magick!   
    Probably anybody who  lived in Turkey for a period long enough to taste at least the basic Turkish foods has already heard of Tarhana..
    Yes, that powder, with a sweet soft orange tone, having a unique aroma..
    This  aroma is so unique that, you cannot confuse it with another food; if something smells like tarhana, yes, it is tarhana, yet, there is no standard way of preparing tarhana!! The only two standard ingredients are flour and yoghurt; to this material, you can add anything you like from a long list of vegetables, herbs, legumes, even fruits; you can add them raw and grinded, or boiled or fried,..but the result is always tarhana..
    The tradition of preparing tarhana does not differ from one region to another, as you may expect, but it can be different even from one village to another, neighbouring village..
    So what's the magick? It is fermentation.. The bacteria in yoghurt work on the flour; the dough made of these two and other ingredients  is spread on a cloth in the open air, wait for a special period, from a few days to ten, depending on the local humidity and temperature, and fermentation takes place..then it gets dry, and grined by hand..
    If you buy some tarhana form your local vegetable market, but you think that its taste is not rich enough, don't worry, add onion, pepper, tomato or paste of them, any spice you like, your soup will welcome all..
    But if you live in a coastal region, or upper/higher/colder areas of them, the chances are small for a plain tarhana to emerge on the market. The rich flora of those regions will make tarhana something special: you can even smell  fenugreek (boy otu/çemen otu) , the herb that is used for preparing 'pastırma', but this is another story! 
     
  4. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Vic801 in Coriander: A secret of Antakya cuisine   
    Turks seem to have  invented a peculiar way of using it! I read somewhere: if you have to drive after drinking some alcohol, chew a piece of kakule and don't worry about the breath-test ! how? Supposedly, it diminishes the amount of alcohol evaporating in the mouth!! the  poor breath-tesing device which doesn't know about the creative skills of Turks will tell the officer that the driver is sober
  5. Like
    saffron got a reaction from IbrahimAbi in Tarhana: some kind of magick!   
    Probably anybody who  lived in Turkey for a period long enough to taste at least the basic Turkish foods has already heard of Tarhana..
    Yes, that powder, with a sweet soft orange tone, having a unique aroma..
    This  aroma is so unique that, you cannot confuse it with another food; if something smells like tarhana, yes, it is tarhana, yet, there is no standard way of preparing tarhana!! The only two standard ingredients are flour and yoghurt; to this material, you can add anything you like from a long list of vegetables, herbs, legumes, even fruits; you can add them raw and grinded, or boiled or fried,..but the result is always tarhana..
    The tradition of preparing tarhana does not differ from one region to another, as you may expect, but it can be different even from one village to another, neighbouring village..
    So what's the magick? It is fermentation.. The bacteria in yoghurt work on the flour; the dough made of these two and other ingredients  is spread on a cloth in the open air, wait for a special period, from a few days to ten, depending on the local humidity and temperature, and fermentation takes place..then it gets dry, and grined by hand..
    If you buy some tarhana form your local vegetable market, but you think that its taste is not rich enough, don't worry, add onion, pepper, tomato or paste of them, any spice you like, your soup will welcome all..
    But if you live in a coastal region, or upper/higher/colder areas of them, the chances are small for a plain tarhana to emerge on the market. The rich flora of those regions will make tarhana something special: you can even smell  fenugreek (boy otu/çemen otu) , the herb that is used for preparing 'pastırma', but this is another story! 
     
  6. Like
    saffron got a reaction from IbrahimAbi in Coriander: A secret of Antakya cuisine   
    Turks seem to have  invented a peculiar way of using it! I read somewhere: if you have to drive after drinking some alcohol, chew a piece of kakule and don't worry about the breath-test ! how? Supposedly, it diminishes the amount of alcohol evaporating in the mouth!! the  poor breath-tesing device which doesn't know about the creative skills of Turks will tell the officer that the driver is sober
  7. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Coriander: A secret of Antakya cuisine   
    Turks seem to have  invented a peculiar way of using it! I read somewhere: if you have to drive after drinking some alcohol, chew a piece of kakule and don't worry about the breath-test ! how? Supposedly, it diminishes the amount of alcohol evaporating in the mouth!! the  poor breath-tesing device which doesn't know about the creative skills of Turks will tell the officer that the driver is sober
  8. Like
    saffron got a reaction from greenstein in Tarhana: some kind of magick!   
    Probably anybody who  lived in Turkey for a period long enough to taste at least the basic Turkish foods has already heard of Tarhana..
    Yes, that powder, with a sweet soft orange tone, having a unique aroma..
    This  aroma is so unique that, you cannot confuse it with another food; if something smells like tarhana, yes, it is tarhana, yet, there is no standard way of preparing tarhana!! The only two standard ingredients are flour and yoghurt; to this material, you can add anything you like from a long list of vegetables, herbs, legumes, even fruits; you can add them raw and grinded, or boiled or fried,..but the result is always tarhana..
    The tradition of preparing tarhana does not differ from one region to another, as you may expect, but it can be different even from one village to another, neighbouring village..
    So what's the magick? It is fermentation.. The bacteria in yoghurt work on the flour; the dough made of these two and other ingredients  is spread on a cloth in the open air, wait for a special period, from a few days to ten, depending on the local humidity and temperature, and fermentation takes place..then it gets dry, and grined by hand..
    If you buy some tarhana form your local vegetable market, but you think that its taste is not rich enough, don't worry, add onion, pepper, tomato or paste of them, any spice you like, your soup will welcome all..
    But if you live in a coastal region, or upper/higher/colder areas of them, the chances are small for a plain tarhana to emerge on the market. The rich flora of those regions will make tarhana something special: you can even smell  fenugreek (boy otu/çemen otu) , the herb that is used for preparing 'pastırma', but this is another story! 
     
  9. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Coriander: A secret of Antakya cuisine   
    The first time I tasted it was when an Iranian office-mate brought some desert from Iran, and served it to the office people..
    Following the Turkish traditon we all thanked or tried to look thankful for that too sweet, too fatty (even when compared with baklava) thing which had a totally unfamiliar aroma..
    Arabic or Persian cuisine does not sound like something from the space to Turks, but this much was really too much... The pieces of the desert somehow disappeared, but not in the normally expected way, for sure..
    It was only me, for the sake of politeness, who tried to swallow a small piece. It was then, I tasted kakule..
    Do you really want to know the rest of the story?
    That Iranian office- mate had an unfortunate habit of going to his home country, more frequently than we all hoped..and we were all  educated enough to look thankful when turned back with the package he was proud of..
    I really don't know for whom the shops stock it..
    I have not met anybody thus far, except for some Antakya folks, who knows it or likes it.. 
  10. Like
    saffron got a reaction from IbrahimAbi in Coriander: A secret of Antakya cuisine   
    The first time I tasted it was when an Iranian office-mate brought some desert from Iran, and served it to the office people..
    Following the Turkish traditon we all thanked or tried to look thankful for that too sweet, too fatty (even when compared with baklava) thing which had a totally unfamiliar aroma..
    Arabic or Persian cuisine does not sound like something from the space to Turks, but this much was really too much... The pieces of the desert somehow disappeared, but not in the normally expected way, for sure..
    It was only me, for the sake of politeness, who tried to swallow a small piece. It was then, I tasted kakule..
    Do you really want to know the rest of the story?
    That Iranian office- mate had an unfortunate habit of going to his home country, more frequently than we all hoped..and we were all  educated enough to look thankful when turned back with the package he was proud of..
    I really don't know for whom the shops stock it..
    I have not met anybody thus far, except for some Antakya folks, who knows it or likes it.. 
  11. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Leaving Fethiye   
    If you move to Fethiye, there will be no change in your electric bills, I guarantee that!!
  12. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Tolga Kagan Onder in Coriander: A secret of Antakya cuisine   
    Coriander is not known much..
    Only some local folks appreciate it, like the Southestern Anatolia people..
    But it occupies a very important place in Antakya cuisine, and let me share a secret with you: if there is no coriander in the famous Antakya dürümü (stuffed rolls), it is never an Antakya dürümü in the real sense! Sure, the paste of a local variety a red pepper shouldn't be ignored.
    Coriander, or Coriandrum sativum, is called 'kişniş' in Turkey: Kishnish. As far as I know, only its seeds are used. It has a unique and strong aroma. Maybe because of this, it is not so widely used as maybe expected, considering its health benefits. Yes, its essential oil has antibacterial and antifungal features..
    Other benefits are pronounced as well, and there is some literature about that, if you are interested in it, I'm sure you can find some reliable  material, as I found..
    As to its antimicrobial features, I guess this is why the Southeastern people use it, the region is hot, and local people love to eat meat..
    Coriander seems to protect the meat..
    But what is more important than this, its antimicrobial features help bowels keep the intestinal flora in balance..
    Where to find? If you cannot find it  at your local supermarket, try herbal shops, but try to find the product of the current season.
    How to use? if just for taste, you can add it into sauces, as seeds , when it was boiled , but for health benefits, grinding  and adding it into food or sauces as raw, small particles is better..
    You can even chew it, as I do..well, not much enjoyable but it worths..
  13. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Leaving Fethiye   
    Hi Çukurbağlı..
    I'm glad to hear that..
    I'd love to know what herbs and spices you use! ! ok, maybe I should start a topic in the Turkish cuisine page..
     
  14. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Leaving Fethiye   
    Hi Ken!! yes it's been a while..though sometimes I took a look at the boards without signing in, to check if there was an urgent need for Turkish..
    So you are looking for a new place to live in? If you are tired of the places too hot, even hotter than before, I have some good ideas!!
    Hi İbrahim Abi! sure I know the herbal shop at the 'Köy Garajı' .. I talked to the owner of the shop, himself, to see if he is in this business following the family tradition or is it just another trendy new shop..
    Yes, he has some traditional knowledge, that's good..this type of shops are rare now..
    But during all that time, I could have found the trace of a true herbalist only once..and , unfortunately I couldn't meet him..
    It is great that you have an organic garden!!
  15. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Leaving Fethiye   
    Hi there!! It's me again!!
    Years pass by running..
    I just read my message posted years ago..
    I was very enthusiastic about herbs and herbal medicine, and I had an intend to start a subforum here..
    But the amount of information available was quite limited..standardization of names was another problem..
    Yes, I studied a lot on the subject; though limited in number, I found some reliable sources as well, but when classified in terms of reliability, there is a huge body of information you can obtain but you cannot freely use , if you want to be sure of what you are talking about..
    So I'm sorry, a subforum was a good project but failed..
    By the way, now I'm living in a town of Isparta, I'm ok, and it seems I will be around again..
  16. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Leaving Fethiye   
    Thank you all, for your kind support..
    Yes, Dande, Burdur-Isparta is an interesting zone for those who are particularly interested in aquatic ecosystems..
    I too love the Lake Eğridir..
    Maybe I would spend a few days there before the winter comes..
    I'm happy to hear that my language posts are understandable, I think I will still have time to write about the Turkish language.
    Good idea, KKW! who knows? a herb for learning Turkish..
    If I were in Fethiye a herb called 'saffron' would be suggested..
  17. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Leaving Fethiye   
    Traditionally, many herbs are believed to cure many ilnesses. Naturally, some of these believes are baseless. The first task is to sort out the material..
    But there is an incredibaly large potential in the Turkish flora..
  18. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Leaving Fethiye   
    Actually I was thinking to write about herbs available at 'attar's , with Turkish and English names, but I just couldn't decide on the format:A whole subforum maybe? or different posts,or in an alphabetic list? Which format would be good enough for reference? After I decide on the format, I will start!
  19. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Leaving Fethiye   
    Thank you..
    I feel everything will go well..
    Yes, sure I will continue with TC ..and yes, I will definitely write about herbs: earlier I was writing about plants, vegetables, etc, only when a question was directed,now I hope I can compile an interesting list and write it with Turkish names..
  20. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Leaving Fethiye   
    Well, I'm not in Fethiye now..
    I lived there for almost five years..
    I liked that still-traditional town, despite all the money flowed into owing to tourism, it was a typical farming zone.
    I spent most of my time among farmers, actually I studied farming in Fethiye, hoping to grow tomatos in a greenhouse. Whenever I met a group of expats , at a cafe or somewhere similar, or on the road, I just felt like saying 'hey,do you know TC? maybe we already met there! But actually I never attempted to say something like that, I just walked away thinking that I would be passing by someone I know..
    I moved to a town of Burdur, to study herbs used in herbal medicine. Maybe one day I would turn back to Fethiye..
  21. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Coriander: A secret of Antakya cuisine   
    Yes, I didn't meet anybody who consumes coriander leaves, but so long as I move from one location to another, I should be ready to meet a different habit of food consumption..and a variety or a species  of a vegetable or a totally unfamiliar fruit,.this always surprises me..
    Cumin is more widely used than coriander.. Like coriander, cumin is believed to have carminative features. In the Southeastern region, where lentil is most commonly used, cumin is a 'must' for the meals made of lentil, as lentil causes intestinal gas and cumin is the cure! Once a friend of mine from Antakya was surprised to see me serving lentil soup without cumin and rushed to the kitchen to find some!!
    Cumin is kimyon, in Turkish..
  22. Like
    saffron got a reaction from greenstein in Coriander: A secret of Antakya cuisine   
    Coriander is not known much..
    Only some local folks appreciate it, like the Southestern Anatolia people..
    But it occupies a very important place in Antakya cuisine, and let me share a secret with you: if there is no coriander in the famous Antakya dürümü (stuffed rolls), it is never an Antakya dürümü in the real sense! Sure, the paste of a local variety a red pepper shouldn't be ignored.
    Coriander, or Coriandrum sativum, is called 'kişniş' in Turkey: Kishnish. As far as I know, only its seeds are used. It has a unique and strong aroma. Maybe because of this, it is not so widely used as maybe expected, considering its health benefits. Yes, its essential oil has antibacterial and antifungal features..
    Other benefits are pronounced as well, and there is some literature about that, if you are interested in it, I'm sure you can find some reliable  material, as I found..
    As to its antimicrobial features, I guess this is why the Southeastern people use it, the region is hot, and local people love to eat meat..
    Coriander seems to protect the meat..
    But what is more important than this, its antimicrobial features help bowels keep the intestinal flora in balance..
    Where to find? If you cannot find it  at your local supermarket, try herbal shops, but try to find the product of the current season.
    How to use? if just for taste, you can add it into sauces, as seeds , when it was boiled , but for health benefits, grinding  and adding it into food or sauces as raw, small particles is better..
    You can even chew it, as I do..well, not much enjoyable but it worths..
  23. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Ken Grubb in Coriander: A secret of Antakya cuisine   
    Coriander is not known much..
    Only some local folks appreciate it, like the Southestern Anatolia people..
    But it occupies a very important place in Antakya cuisine, and let me share a secret with you: if there is no coriander in the famous Antakya dürümü (stuffed rolls), it is never an Antakya dürümü in the real sense! Sure, the paste of a local variety a red pepper shouldn't be ignored.
    Coriander, or Coriandrum sativum, is called 'kişniş' in Turkey: Kishnish. As far as I know, only its seeds are used. It has a unique and strong aroma. Maybe because of this, it is not so widely used as maybe expected, considering its health benefits. Yes, its essential oil has antibacterial and antifungal features..
    Other benefits are pronounced as well, and there is some literature about that, if you are interested in it, I'm sure you can find some reliable  material, as I found..
    As to its antimicrobial features, I guess this is why the Southeastern people use it, the region is hot, and local people love to eat meat..
    Coriander seems to protect the meat..
    But what is more important than this, its antimicrobial features help bowels keep the intestinal flora in balance..
    Where to find? If you cannot find it  at your local supermarket, try herbal shops, but try to find the product of the current season.
    How to use? if just for taste, you can add it into sauces, as seeds , when it was boiled , but for health benefits, grinding  and adding it into food or sauces as raw, small particles is better..
    You can even chew it, as I do..well, not much enjoyable but it worths..
  24. Like
    saffron got a reaction from zainulabidin in Story Telling   
    The Turkish oral literature includes legends, mythology, verses, stories, tales, 'meddah' stories, jokes and other forms of oral literature. These forms survive to varying degrees, depending on the geographical zone. The Eastern Anatolia, for instance, is a region where stories are still told. In the long and cold nights spent by stoves , the stories and other forms of oral literature seem to have found more chance to be heard and passed to the next generation.
    The tradition of story telling is carried by special people called 'aşık' (sometimes halk aşığı). Though in modern Turkish 'aşık' means someone who fell in love, it is not always so. Aşık is a person who knows how to play 'saz', the Turkish string instrument as you probably know, which has the types like bağlama, divan, cura,..in different sizes.
    Aşık tells the story, plays saz and sings:the lyrics are the verses which are part of the story, or written by aşık, himself, or earlier poets.
    The stories are mostly about love or the adventures of heros. The most important heroic story is 'Köroğlu', which has many versions told in different areas of the Turcic world.
    Some of these aşık's has an interesting feature: While they are sitting by a river or a spring, they fall asleep. In their dreams a 'pir' (an old man considered as holy) appears and offers something to drink. This special holy liquid is called 'bade'. The holy old man asks him what type of a bade he wants: for love or for a heroic life. If the candidate asks for love, then pir shows him a picture of a girl, and disappears. He wakes up and feels desperatly in love with the girl. He spends his life to find the girl, and his experiences become the subject of another folk story, which, sometimes has a happy end and sometimes a tragedical one..
  25. Like
    saffron got a reaction from Silkroute in Catching My Local Bakkal Cheating Foreigners (me!)   
    Hi Laura, everybody has the right to talk to Kaymakam or even Vali -governor, as they are there for the people. This type of complaints, I mean, complaining about something at the office of Kaymakam or Vali happens when a citizen cannot solve his/ her problem, which may be personal or collective, through the usual ways. Let me give an example to show what I mean. If the tapu officer in Antioch had prolonged the formalities of my issue for another unneccesry period, and if the office director wouldnt interfere with the situation, I would be going right to the governor to complain. But this doesnt mean that I would be suing the tapu officer; taking action against a government employee is a different thing and has its own procedural rules. What I might have done would be just saying, ' sir, they are doing this do me, please take some action'..
    Or a collective issue: A group of local people can go to Kaymakam or Governor to seek a solution to their local problem which can only solved by the state. Shortly, referring the situation to Kaymakam or Vali is not a legal prodecure to follow, but a normal request of a citizen from the administrator representing the state, and people do this when they find no other solution..
    Maliye is the office monitoring business activities.
    When a shopkeeper violates trade law and prodecures, he is accountable for this before Maliye: For instance writing and giving the bill to the customer is an obligation of the shopkeeper, likewise, asking for the bill , too, is an obligation of the citizen. If he refuses to give it, you can report this immediately. As to overcharging, this is definetly misusing the trust of the customer and unfair competion. If you report this to Maliye, they would come to check what is going on. Most probably the shopkeeper would deny this, but just the fear from Maliye is enough for him to be careful next time, and if the dispute turns into a serious one, the bill will serve as evidence. How can you use it? You can ask a few friend to go and buy the same thing: on the bill the item purchased is specified, along with the brand name. If he, lets say sells a bottle of milk of this or that brand, at different prices to different persons when there is no acceptable reason for this price difference, his intend will be obvious.
    What are the standard priced items? many products with brand name are sold on the basis of a dealer agreement. The dealer is supposed to monitor the retailers for price standards and other trade standards of the producer. I cannot know and make a list of them, naturally, but if you check the shelves of 'supermarkets', you will notice that many things are sold following some trade policy. A supermarket can apply a special discount, probably as per the agreement with the producer, but, except for this, brand products are sold at consistent prices. I dont mean that bakkal has to sell an item at the same price with the supermarket, I mean, supermarket can be an example of more or less standard items like milk, yoghurt, soap, etc. A bakkal will be a bit more expensive than a supermarket, this is normal and usual. But again this doesnt mean that he is free to sell whatever he wants at whatever price he likes to different customers. If he does this only once, he can say 'oh sorry, by mistake' But if you can evidence what he is doing, with bills, he cannot simply say oh sorry and get rid of Maliye. What if you want to call Maliye and complain when you have no evidence of witness? They will still come, listen to you, understand the problem and most probably warn the shopkeeper and go. This alone is enough for him!!
    I'm editing this post later, to make a summary of this confusing issue..
    With standard priced items, I mean the goods sold under an agreement, like beer or many brands of icecream. The price consistency at supermarkets is not always the sign of a some standard price fixed by some agreement, but regular shopping from them will soon give an idea about standard prices. The guaranteed way to prove the mistake done to a customer is the bill, which is called 'fish' when it is printed by 'yazar kasa'. A 'yazar kasa' is a registered machine printing the bills, keeping the cash, etc, which is subject to inspection by Maliye when it deems necessary. Those 'fishes 'or bills are the only evidence of taxable income of the shop owner, so Maliye has a strict control over them. Therefore a shop owner cannot make joke on that. If you ask for the bill, which you are expected to ask, he cannot dare to refuse to give, and cannot play with it. Once in Antakya a pastry shop has the habit of refusing to give the bill, saying each time 'yazar kasa doesnt work now, it needs some repair'. Hearing the same excuse for the third time I called Maliye. Since then, their yazar kasa never fails.
    Naturally Maliye is not the only authority which brings rules and sanctions. A businessman or a shop owner, like any other citizen, will be prosecuted if he is involved in fraudulant acts in his business. But the petition will be filed with the public prosecutor- savcı-, then.
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