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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/12/10 in all areas

  1. Source: Time Out Istanbul, by: Santiago Brusadin 1. You automatically take off your shoes when entering a house. 2. You’ve tried all the types of street food Istanbul offers: corn, stuffed mussels, chickpeas on rice, nuts, pomegranate juice, popcorn... 3. Not a day goes by without drinking at least one çay (tea). If it does, you feel weird about it. 4. Friends don’t invite you to their homes for dinner, but for breakfast. 5. You know the name of the guy at the bakkal (corner store) on your street. 6. Everything is çok (very): çok güzel, çok iyi, çok ayıp... 7. You have started to answer questions by repeating the answer (evet, evet; var, var; hayır, hayır; yok, yok). 8. You’ve forgotten what it means to recycle. 9. You no longer hear the honking of car horns. 10. You know there is always traffic in Istanbul: the question is whether there is traffic or A LOT of traffic. 11. You know you’ll find a portrait of Atatürk everywhere you go. 12. You have learned to accept yogurt as something salty you drink with your food rather than something sweet you eat for dessert. 13. You hardly hear it anymore when the mosques issue the call to prayer. Five times a day. Starting at 05.30. 14. You have drunk çay when it’s 35 degrees Celsius outside. 15. You know the only way to cross the street is kamikaze-style, with the cars passing just a few centimetres away. Traffic lights? What are those? 16. You know the first rule about Atatürk is: you do not say anything bad about Atatürk. 17. And the second rule about Atatürk is: you do not say anything bad about Atatürk. 18. You ask for a student discount or try to bargain for almost everything. 19. Remember when you used to notice how there was always a smartass jumping the queue without anyone complaining? Now you’re that smartass. 20. You go to the Tarlabaşı market every Sunday to buy fruits and vegetables at extremely cheap prices. And you still try to bargain for a better deal. 21. You know where all the happy-hour places are. 22. You always drink the biggest beer because "it’s just one lira more." 23. You’re still looking for the cheapest kebab in the city. 24. You have a nazar boncuğu ("evil eye") in your house or your room. 25. You do not say "ok"; you say "tamam." 26. You kiss both cheeks with your close male friends. 27. It doesn’t surprise you anymore to see two macho guys walking together with linked arms. 28. The entrance to your house looks like a shoe store. 29. You have accepted olives and cheese as part of your breakfast. 30. You have accepted that there will always be soup and yogurt with your food. 31. You have a favourite brand of rakı. 32. You have accepted yogurt as a sauce. 33. You are thinking about growing a moustache to look cool. 34. You think it’s normal to "drink a cigarette," "close the phone" or having it be "raining snow." 35. You call older neighbours "aunt" and "uncle." 36. You say "allah allah" to complain or express anger. 37. You don’t get surprised when some people still give prices in millions of liras. 38. You compare the price of an alcoholic drink to the food you could eat for that same amount. 39. You now expect to get a wet-wipe soaked in lemon scent at the end of a restaurant meal. 40. When you need groceries, you call the shop on the corner and have them sent up to you in a basket. 41. You know that kahvaltı means "under or after the coffee" – and that there is never coffee after breakfast. 42. You have eaten an islak (wet) hamburger after partying. 43. You have eaten midye dolma (stuffed mussels) after a night out. And you’ve stopped asking yourself where they come from or how they’re prepared. 44. You know you’ll always find the sugar served in cubes 45. You’ve stopped expecting sauce in your döner kebab and know it is normal to find French fries in it instead. 46. You expect to climb a ton of stairs to reach a bar or nightclub. 47. You only go to the historic part of the city when your friends visit you. 48. You think it’s normal for motorcyclists to ride in the wrong direction, without a helmet. 49. You know every building has a name of a person on it, and usually two numbers: the old one and the new one. 50. You have learned to play tavla (backgammon). Better yet, you’ve spent a whole afternoon drinking çay, smoking nargile (hookah) and playing tavla.
    6 points
  2. Tell him you want to spend some time with him and ask him to lend you the airfare.
    6 points
  3. First of All I strongly recommend not to buy from the Development stage construction. If you want be hassle free, only go to finished properties which already have ISKAN document... İSKAN BELGESİ (document) is the main document which construction companies has to show this construction has been completed regarding its architectural plans and debt free to receive it. And if the construction does not have İskan document, means you strongly will be faced off problems in near future. But still you can say I want to buy a property from a project, I warn you this means %50 less price maybe but also %50 risk. Most of the construction companies does not have money to complete all construction at the beginning of the project in Turkey, They get the land from the land owner without paying any money, they made an agreement with land owner to pay with finished flats when they finishes the construction. They receive credit for initial expenses from banks and the start sales from the project, and they make money if they can make a sale. So which means if there is no sufficient sales from project, they will never have money to finalize construction. (please do not make a choice trough shinny presentation books) So it means you will hardly get your flat finished. we have a lot of clients who suffers from construction companies, which delivers the flats half made, or do not deliver the title deed even after they receive full amount of sale, and because they did not made sale the banks could easily show those real estate to banks to get loan and show them as an ipotek ( escrow) and banks sells the properties... And also, its not a rule but if the construction company or real estate agent refer you a lawyer, be careful a bit. Do not forget, generally lawyers who referred by agents or construction companies are also bounded with them.... But if you still insist to buy from the project you should ask your your right to be written at title book in tapu.. Which should made trough notary, and registered to title deed book it cost a bit money but saves you. Do not trust pre sale agreements, if the title deed does not transferred on your name, those agreement signed between parties will not force construction company to deliver the title deed on your name.
    6 points
  4. My tongue firmly in cheek article regarding marrying a beautiful Turkish girl http://maninantalya.blogspot.com/2013/03/so-you-want-turkish-wife.html
    6 points
  5. I had such a good laugh reading through some of the threads in this section. There were so many times where I was like omg that is so true haha I thought I was the only one who thought this. I thought I would just share some of my ideas on things I found different here. I live with my bf and his fam for over a year now and there have been many things I noticed different lol. - Cleaning! Omg do Turkish women ever stop cleaning I feel so dirty?? I am usually known to be really clean back home but here I feel like I am not up to standard lol. Wearing those house slippers all the time! Making the bed and shaking the sheet out the window! I really hate that because sometimes back home I leave the house and don't make the bed but here its like you don't just make the bed you remake the bed. - Those white embroidered cloth things that Turkish women put everywhere in their house that look so 1980s! - Not knowing some family members names because you have to call them eniste or hala. It was really hard for me to adjust to the name thing at first calling people by their name followed by teyze or amca - I really felt like it made my communication awful because I barely called people by these names I just tried to catch their eye and then talk with them. I am more relaxed with it now though. But I definitely prefer how in english we call people just by their names. And oh when I get married and I have to call my parents in laws anne and baba - that is gona be so hard for me. - When you arrive at someones home or people arrive at your home and there are so many people you have to kiss. God I just wana say hello and sit down lol. -Being a guest in someones home and knowing you have to eat something you don't like out of respect - many awful memories of that but its good when your hungry and the food is nice - saw the thread about turkish children haha so true why are children always awake so late. I was going crazy firstly when all my bfs little cousins would be here until 11 at night it was too much! They even had school the next morning and they would be doing their homework at 9. There is no routine at all. Am used to it by now ha. - turkish men always sitting on the streets outside their shops etc like they seem like women gossiping on the streets. and at the pazar its mostly turkish men who work this but usually back home women work at the markets. oh and they always have those prayer beads in their hand. - when you go shopping and the people who work there follow you around - leave me alone I just wana shop! Obviously in the tourist areas its worse as they know you are foreign but even here in Istanbul in the big supermarkets they follow you although they don't talk. -turkish women gossiping - well lets be honest all women gossip haha but I mean they always have something to say about someones relationship or marriage. and the amazing power that turkish women have over their childrens lives. Thankfully I get along with my MiL but I wouldn't wana imagine if we didn't she would make my life hell. - cats! everywhere ..omg -summer time and people having mangal (bbq) everywhere, and those floppy plastic thing they use to get the mangal going lol - security guards everywhere - when you go to the shopping centre and they check the boot of your car, when you have to get your bag scanned before you enter the shopping centre - it seems so unnecessary and a waste of the states money. - the way old people are so respected - love that and its something definitely we lack in western culture I think haha well there are lots more I just can't think now. I love it here though! If I think of more later I will post them.
    6 points
  6. This was my first time to visit Ankara. Compared with other cities in Turkey, Ankara, despite the fact it is the capital city, is less well-known for some reason. (At least to me). Many of my friends actually believed Istanbul is the capital of Turkey. One thing that impressed me about Ankara is that the streets are very neat and clean. The whole city is pretty quiet. I loved the small mansions along the little streets. And the roads are twisted and sloped, which are attractive to me. Unfortunately, I was in Ankara to meet Chinese counselor and ambassador, so my exploration of the city was limited to the embassy area. I don't know if other areas are the same. Also the whether was nice and cool. The sun was shining brightly, yet I could barely feel the heat. In Adana, gosh, I could get myself burnt in the sun. Loved the city. Wish I had more time to stay. Maybe next time.
    6 points
  7. Thank you for that, that's a very nice post and we will help if we can. As I am over 65 I am now confined pretty much to my house and garden so helping others online will be a pleasant distraction from my normal day to day activities.
    5 points
  8. For those of us interested in learning Turkish, I highly recommend the program DuoLingo. It's free, and available on your desktop or as an app. I have just started a Turkish club through DuoLingo, so if anyone is interested in joining just download the app or find it online, and use the code P25XNW! Cheers!
    5 points
  9. IbrahimAbi

    Turkey today

    Where in Turkey were you today? What did you see? let's add one photo to share the moment and encourage others to get out and about. Yesterday we were walking the dogs around Lake Eğirdir in Isparta province
    5 points
  10. I see bars, cafes, restaurants and various stores open and close all the time. So it is risky, and there are much safer places to invest money. Often, opening a small business is basically giving yourself a low-paying job with very long hours and a lot of work! So I don't have a high opinion of starting a business in Turkey. The first thing to do is write a business plan. This is not something one should do in their head, it needs to be written. There are plenty of resources that can be found in Google about how to write one, as well as examples. Writing a business plan will also force one to do their homework, and market research. Many businesses worldwide fail because they had no business plan, or they didn't follow it. One interesting note. If a business in Turkey is successful, someone will copy it. And probably open a copycat business right across the street. There's a street in Izmir we used to call "potato alley." A guy opened the first business selling stuffed potatoes. Now the whole street is populated buy businesses who copied him. A Turk once told me "If you open a bar and it is successful, after two years, sell it!" He was referring to the fact that if a business is successful and word gets out, everybody will start doing the same thing in the same place. If they buy a business, this is not a good idea. Chances are the previous owner will grossly exaggerate the income, and not tell them anything about the problems or expenses. This is so common that it can be expected. Also, if they buy a company, they will incur any liabilities of that company (including pending lawsuits) that they may know nothing about. So if they want to run it as a company, they should open a new one instead of buying an already-existing one. Me, I would avoid doing it completely. I have said this in another topic... it is much safer and secure to invest in the stocks and bonds of already existing companies with a successful outlook, in a mutual fund which pools clients' money, run by a fund manager who is educated to know good businesses from bad ones.
    5 points
  11. From what I am reading, it doesn't look like the situation for the Turkish Lira is going to improve for a while. I think any country which has a coup, not to mention the other problems Turkey has right now, is going to be considered a risky place to invest. And if you invest in a country, you have to invest using their currency. When investments drop, demand for the currency drops, then the price drops as investors find safer places to put their money. I remember back in 2000 when Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit had an argument with another government official, which indicated that the government was going to do nothing about corruption and graft. It was on TV. Just that alone caused investors to pull their money out overnight. The Lira dropped to what, at the time, was something like 2.5 to the US dollar. In fact, you couldn't even exchange money at the currency exchange place because nobody even knew what a Turkish Lira was worth. And now it's dropped to 3.7 or so. And my rent for a three-bedroom apartment is now less than $200 USD.
    5 points
  12. Cukurbagli

    Snow in Antalya

    Had it here in Çukurbağ too.
    5 points
  13. Ken Grubb

    What should I believe?

    Love scam artists, and other scam artists I have met in Turkey, never ask for money right away. They work multiple people at the same time, who pay off at different times. So they are patient. Not only that, but a lot of the love scammers really just want to go somewhere other than Turkey, so you might be his ticket. So meet the parents or not, it still doesn't mean you're not being scammed or that there is no hidden agenda. I hope you're not being scammed, and it would be wonderful to hear later that you got married and lived the rest of your lives together in total happiness. I'm just saying that many times, it doesn't work out that way. If you want to play it safe, find somebody else. If you want to take your chances, then go for it. But I don't think you will find anybody here, who has lived in Turkey for a while, who could in good conscience confirm what you wish to believe in your situation. Oh. And you will also hear "that is what everybody says about Turkish men. That is why I cannot find a nice girl to marry. Everybody thinks we are all trying to take advantage of women." They all say that, stuff, too. And before long they will have you feeling ashamed that you even thought such a thing about them. This is not our regular thing, although we try to help women in such situations (especially after the heart break and much money has been lost). I would suggest searching Google (and even Facebook) for "turkish love rat." Connect with women who have been in your situation, read about what happened to them, and ask them for advice as well. Here's one story: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2653975/My-Turkish-love-rat-left-pregnant-heartbroken-A-models-tale-holiday-romance-gone-horribly-wrong.html You may dislike what you are reading here, but what we are telling you may very well spare you from a huge heartbreak. I have seen enough of those already. If you lived in Turkey, got to know the guy really well, learned from the context of his life that he really is a great guy, and knew him for a year or so, on a daily basis, that would be different. You could be much more sure about him. Otherwise, you're taking a huge risk with a small probability that he is what he says he is.
    5 points
  14. Your evisa would have expired,it's only valid for 6 months [ Jan to June ] ,so when your student residency ran out,you were in effect here illegally. You should now contact the Turkish Embassy in your home country & ask them to contact Immigration in Turkey to find out your situation.
    5 points
  15. I've had a Turkish credit card with every bank here i've been with, the only restriction is that it's capped standard at 1k tl. Never asked if the ceiling figure can be raised, i assume it could be if asked and there were funds to cover it. I've never been refused on any Turkish buying site with it. In fact many sites won;'t accept my UK visa credit card & will only accept a Turkish credit [not debit ] card.
    5 points
  16. Hello Roro, welcome to Turkey Central. As you are aware there has been an attempted military coup here in Turkey. As a result of that thousands of army men have been arrested. I would imagine that the rest of the men in the army are now under very strict discipline so even if your boyfriend has not been arrested he may not be allowed access to a computer or phone. Try not to worry too much and trust that he will get in touch with you when he can.
    5 points
  17. A dumb thing an American (or maybe Canadian) tourist might say: "Turkey's too dangerous. Let's go to Mexico!"
    5 points
  18. Fil

    Moving to Turkey

    Hello Gemfamily, Please excuse the brevity of my response last night, I shall try to be more helpful now. It is difficult to see from your posts the underllying assumptions and reasons for considering moving to Turkey. I can understand that London is the opposite of quiet, peaceful and living and working there is certainly stressful, but so is living and working in Turkey. It is debatable which is more so, but it will be extremely hard to find peace and quiet in any big Turkish city, especially in Antalya. That is why I am wondering how much experience you have of life in Turkey, and if your experience is very limited I am wondering how you can be considering a move here. Is it a case of the other man's grass is always greener? Or familiarity breeds contempt, in terms of life in UK. As far as I can see there are 4 types of people who leave UK to live in Turkey. 1- people with a Turkish spouse or partner. 2- people of Turkish heritage who wish to make contact with their roots. 3- English language teachers who want to live somewhere with a rich cultural heritage, probably for a short time. 4- retired people who want to live somewhere warmer and more economical than Europe. Of these 4 groups only the retired people have a lifestyle that could be described as calm, peaceful and stress free. In addition to these groups, recently 3 more groups have arrived in Turkey. 5- refugees mainly from Syria, 6- students, many from Africa, or Iraq, supported either by their own governments or the Turkish government. 7- economic migrants, most working at or below the minimum wage in carer jobs such as looking after children or disabled people. None of these groups find living in Turkey easy, expecially at first. I am sorry, I have to go now, I shall continue later.
    5 points
  19. Private schools will set you back 10000TL to 35000TL a year for your older daughter. The younger one is kindergarten age, that will be 450TL per month up to 1000TL per month. Whether you choose state or private you will need to provide a lot of back-up and additional support. Speaking personally I do not think the private schools provide anything like value for money. The teachers are the same as in state schools. The curriculum is the same. The private schools' main selling point is teaching English, which presumably yours already have, so they will be wasting their time for 12 lessons a week. All you get for the extra money is cleaner toilets and facilities and smaller classes. We preferred to spend spare cash on educational support for the children, not on school fees. I feel that foreign parents are better off considering state school, home schooling or a combination of state and home schooling. At least state school will provide good opportunities for learning Turkish and meeting people. If your children have a Turkish parent then home schooling is probably not an option. If your stay is long-term and your children might want to attend university and work in Turkey, then state school is probably preferable. If your stay is short-term and the children will need to rejoin another education system later on, then home schooling is probably the best option. Our children went all through state school from start to finish, one is now at university in Ankara and the other starts university next year. It was quite tough for them (and their parents) at times, but they have gained excellent skills in writing and speaking Turkish, which couldn't really have been done without going through Turkish education. I also suspect their maths is better in Turkey than it would have been in UK, although there is no way of knowing for sure. And I think the gender stereotyping concerning subjects is worse in UK than in Turkey. Although not by that much, and both have ended up choosing languages at university (like their father), but at least they were not heavily channeled in that direction by the schools from age 14. If children have good Turkish language skills to start off with, then the shool experiences are less difficult. But it is never easy anywhere to be different, particularly for children. It also seems to be somewhat tougher for boys than for girls. You have a difficult decision, and it will never be easy, but try to focus on the many positive aspects, the unique experiences, the language skills, the insights into different types of people. It is important for parents to be very supportive, encouraging and flexible. Establish good channels of communication and keep them open no matter what, keep calm, don't get angry whatever happens. Help and encourage with homework, but don't let it get you or your child down. many teachers set too much homework, most of it pointless and intended to keep the children off the streets. Good luck.
    5 points
  20. Ken Grubb

    Turkish Men

    There have been some disastrous relationships between foreign women and the Turkish men they've met on holiday. It's the women who end up suffering as a result, even after the "relationship" has gone on for some time. Yes, some of these romances work out well, and I'm definitely not trying to paint all Turkish men with the same broad brush.Remember this, ladies: The learned (and practiced) skills which make a man a good barman, animator, or waiter, the skills which enable him to convince passers-by to eat their restaurant are the same skills which make him good with women.Turkish Men – Why Your Holiday Romance Is Doomed
    5 points
  21. Hi. I am a Turkish man in his fifties who has lived most of his adult life abroad in English speaking countries. General Turkish education system produces a certain type of person. When that is coupled with a traditional family background, the result is a certain type of person which makes up roughly 90 to 95 percent of the Turkish population. However, there is a small percentage of Turkish population which follow a path outside this system (educated abroad or having a family outside the typical). If your Turkish boyfriend/girlfriend/lover/partner/husband/wife is in this 10%, then things are going to be very different than being with a Turkish person who is in the 90%. So really, rate your Turkish person. Is the person in the 10% or in the 90% ? The differences are huge. If the person is in the 10%, he/she is very much like an American person in the mind. But if the person is in the 90%, then everything will be very much traditional Turkish. If you have found someone who is in the 10%, your chances of being happy with that person is as high as a western partner and maybe even more. But if the person is in the 90%, then you'll face the challanges of the traditional way of Turkish thinking. Living as a Turkish man for decades in the west, I have had my share of negativity about the Turkish and suffered from it. Things like women declining to date me as soon as they find out my Turkish roots. But their basis is that 90%. What about the 10% that is being burnt out because of the reputation of the 90% ? In the western countries, it is almost like a curse having Turkish roots. Most people and especially the opposite sex would dismiss you based on your background. That is the ugly reality. If you are on this forum, you obviously are a lover of Turkey and its people. If you have made such an unconventional choice, I firstly would congradulate you because I think you are not in the 90% in your home country either and you can think outside the box. If you have found a Turkish man or a woman who is in the 10%, you may have a jewel in your hands who will make you very happy for the rest of your life.
    5 points
  22. sue

    Our Kids At School

    We've been in Istanbul for 15 months now, and here is some of our experience of putting English speaking kids into school. As we arrived here in September, and it took us a month to be able to move into our new flat, and then another month to be full up and running, it was November before the kids were ready to go to school. At that point I was working in a couple of part-time jobs, so the only option, as we don't have the finances for an International School, was to send the kids to the local state school. State SchoolProsJust at the end of the streetSmall classes (although this is unusual)Wonderful teachersFinishes at 2.30pmConsReally dirty environmentNot exactly Health and Safety risk assessed! Our kids got treated as though they were aliens by some other kids, as they had NEVER met foreignersNo extra help with Turkish literacySo they were only there for half a school year, but they did make friends, and the manager and teachers were very supportive. However, my husband cringed on a daily basis having to leave them in such a dirty place! Then I got a few job offers from some private schools, and took into consideration the scholarship offers and the type of schools ie. run by religious organisations, size, my salary and conditions etc. I decide to work for a new school that didn't have religious leanings, and was keen on the cultural benefits of teaching English, not just the exam results, it is also a small ilkokul, they also offered me 1 full and 1 half scholarships, plus transport, food, some books and some uniform thrown in! So the kids started in September. I've got 1 in 2nd grade and 1 in 4th grade. Private SchoolProsNice teachersSmall classes (although as the school grows the numbers will increase)Cleaner than the state schoolLessons in chess, dance, music, clubs, French, German etc. The other students are welcoming and tolerant of our kidsOther students from other countriesKids who try to speak English to our kidsCons40 minutes travel time (this is quite normal for a lot of school children in Istanbul)9 'lessons' a dayHome at 4.45pmHomeworkNo extra help with Turkish literacyConsidering they've just been thrown in the deep end without much extra help, they're doing really well. They are picking up Turkish from their friends, and the older students are like big brothers and sisters to them, and help them if they are upset. My OH does the homework with them, as my Turkish isn't up to it, and sometimes he is exasperated with the type of 'test' questions they get. He's even been to school and asked them "Who WRITES these questions?" They are tests they 'have to give', from the education council. He says they are pointless, convoluted for no apparent reason, especially for a 2nd grader. He thinks they are trying to 'teach' common sense, but they do it in this convoluted manner. The teachers he's spoken to agree with him, but say the 'have to give' the work, and agree that the system is based too much on 'ticking boxes'. It's less about the process and more about the result. But it's an ingrained attitude which I find even in Kindergarten, where the teachers don't let the children work their own way through an activity - they will take over and complete it for them, so it 'looks' good for the parents - a bit like a controlling 'helicopter parent'!! It's like the emphasis on neat cursive writing in 1st grade....... Is the content important? Is the creativity important? No, the 'correct' script is important!! Our biggest concern is the Turkish education system as a whole when considering their futures. Parents who have the option the send their children to other countries for university, don't even consider sending them to Turkish universities. Although they agree that socially Turkey is better for teenagers than UK or USA. My husband says "Turkey doesn't want thinkers, it wants workers."I'd say "The Turkish government doesn't want thinkers, it wants workers, but Turkey NEEDS thinkers."I really don't think the education system produces thinkers. And people who have been through the system and are thinkers (that WE know of) are frustrated and demoralised here. Ultimately we're viewing this as an experience for them. And will continue to try to keep them interested in 'learning' in a broad sense.
    5 points
  23. Apartment Shopping If you don't speak Turkish, the first thing to do is to find a friend or a property agent who does. Turks generally go out of their way to help foreigners, and many business owners at least have someone nearby who speaks enough English to get the job done. Internet Listings By using the Turkish property listings, you'll find better deals than you would on English-language websites directed at foreigners. See the External Links section for websites which have property listings. Some have English versions, and some don't. You can use our Guide to Turkish Property Terms (see the links at the bottom) to understand what you're reading. If you check the listings daily, you may find a great place to live before anybody else does. And by printing out the listings you like, you'll have handy information in hand for your apartment shopping trip. National and Local Newspapers You can go to a local newsstand and find out what hard-copy newspapers are circulated in the area, both national and local papers. Find out on what day the new property listings are published. On that day, pick up a paper early, and be ready to start making phone calls at 09:00 AM. Good properties go fast. Property Agents Property agents, or emlak, are plentiful in Turkey, and they come in all sizes. They are a handy resource to find quality properties. Visit several of them, since there is no central directory of properties for rent, and each agent will have different apartments available. Turkish property agents get a commission for the properties they rent, equivalent to one month's rent, paid by the renter. If an agent doesn't have what you need but knows of another agent who does, and if you rent from the other agent, the two agents split the commission. For that reason, property agents will first show you their properties (sometimes including properties with characteristics you said you didn't want) before they show you those of competitors. Using All of the Above If you find in the internet or newspaper listings that an attractive apartment is being advertised by a particular property agent, you can also ask that agent to show you the properties of other agents which you found in the listings. This can save you the time of making appointments and finding addresses. Walking Around Walking or driving around a neighborhood where you would like to live ls also a good way to find a place to live. Look for a sign which says kiralik (kee-rah-look), which means "for rent." You'll also see signs which say satılık (sah-tah-look), which means "for sale." Another important term is sahabinden (sah-ha-been-den) which means "from owner." The name and telephone number of a property agency or the owner will be on the sign. The Inspection Have a good look around the property to make sure everything is in good order. Include every detail in the contract, so the landlord can't claim compensation from you when you move out. Some landlords can be very picky, and will look for any excuse to retain part of the deposit. If there is anything in the apartment you don't want to stay and don't intend to turn over to the landlord at the end of the lease, have the landlord remove it. Do not discard anything thinking the landlord will be okay with it. An old rickety set of shelves that you remove while occupying the premises may be later claimed by the landlord to be an antique given to him by a some beloved deceased relative, and used to extort your deposit from you. Previous Owners Will Have Removed Everything Which Was Not Nailed Down, and also Some Things That Were You will find that any former Turkish tenants have taken everything but the kitchen sink (they do, however, sometimes take the faucets). Even light fixtures may be removed, leaving a bare wire protruding from a hole in the ceiling. The water heater and other such fixtures will likely have been removed. Apartment Layout In cities, all apartments have a similar layout. The kitchen and salon (living room) face the outside, and the bedrooms are on the inside. Typically there is a large master bedroom with the other bedrooms being smaller, sometimes much smaller. The washing machine goes in the bathroom. Use of electric clothes driers is rare but gaining in popularity, so there might not be room for a washer and a drier in the bathroom. Stacked washer and drier combination units are available for this purpose, if the water heater (normally attached to the wall in the bathroom) doesn't get in the way. Turks like balconies (who doesn't?). You might find that even your kitchen and bedroom have a balcony. Balconies are usually where clothes are dried, either on lines attached to the building walls or on collapsible clothes drying racks that are widely available. Turks sometimes sleep on their balconies during warm weather. Closet Space Many Turkish apartments don't have closets. So you will have to buy a wall unit to store your clothes. Curtains You will also have to buy curtains. See our article on furnishing and equipping your home for ideas on how to get set up in your new place. The Landlord Some landlords in Turkey will do little or nothing to repair anything that needs repair or upkeep. They will expect you to pay repairs, of everything, including sinks, toilets, plumbing, and electrical wiring and fixtures. One option to deal with this is to deduct the cost of any repairs you have to make from the rent, and provide the landlord with a fatura (invoice), for the cost of the repairs. Your landlord may object to this, but it is doubtful that he or she would ever go to court about it, because of the amount of time court cases take in Turkey. Besides that, the judge involved would be unlikely to side with the landlord. To be on the safe side, though, it's a good idea to have a clause for this placed into the rental contract. Important! When you apply for a residence permit, the immigration office will require a copy of your landlord's identification card as part of the documentation you need to prove you have an address. So make sure the landlord understands this and is willing to provide one. Negotiation Once you find a place that you like and can afford, try to negotiate the rent to a lower price. A few minutes of haggling may save you a lot of money. Once you reach an agreement, you will sign the rental contract. The Rental Contract Property rental contracts in Turkey are rather standard, and can be bought in a stationery store. But make sure you have someone translate it for you so you know exactly what you are signing. The typical Turkish rental contract is a four-page document (one large page folded in half). On the contract's pages are the following: Page 1: Landlord and renter personal information and the terms of the rental, such as duration and the amount of rent. Pages 2 and 3: Covers the terms of the rental agreement. Page 4: A record of payments. Each time you pay, you record the payment amount and date, and sign it with your landlord. If you deposit the rent into the landlord's bank account, have the bank add a note that the payment is for rent (kira). Save the deposit receipt. This bank deposit receipt can also serve as proof of payment. Additional Agreements: If you make any additional agreements with the landlord, make sure they are in the contract, because your friendly and amiable landlord may not be so lenient later. Terminating the Contract According to the Turkish code of obligations, you must provide 15 days notice, in writing (translated to Turkish) before the anniversary date of the contract if you want to terminate it. If you don't do this, the contract will automatically renew for the period set in the contract (as in another year) and you will be legally bound to pay the extra year's rent whether you are living there or not. When you deliver written notice, take two copies. Sign both and also have the landlord sign both. Keep one copy as proof of notice. Some tenants think they can just forfeit the deposit and vacate the property any time they want. This is not so, and a landlord can take you to court, if he or she wants to go through the trouble, and successfully sue you for the remaining balance due on the contract. If you think you might need to vacate the property some time in the middle of the contract, have a "get out early" clause written in to the contract to protect yourself. If you want to renew the contract on a monthly basis, make the new contract so it expires in one month. In that case it will automatically renew every month (instead of every year). The Deposit Although the deposit is often the equivalent of one-month's rent, its purpose is to cover the repair of any damages, and not non-payment of rent. While legally it is limited to a maximum of three month's rent, it can be negotiated, and you should never pay any more than reasonably necessary. Important! If you do decide to hand over cash to your landlord, beware of any request for an excessively high deposit. Some landlords ask for a high deposit amount because they intend to keep it when you vacate, using any excuse to not refund it, assuming that you are at a disadvantage and unlikely to sue them to get it back. The proper way to pay a deposit is not by handing cash to the landlord. According to the most recent version of Turkey's Code of Obligations (Turkish law), you and your landlord should go to a bank and put the deposit into a kira depozito ortak hesabı (rent deposit joint account). If you do it that way, then the bank, by law, must return it to you upon request after three months of the date you vacate the property, unless the landlord informs the bank, in writing, that there is an active lawsuit against you for damages. If your landlord balks at this, don't rent from that landlord. Rent Increases If you pay your rent in Turkish lira, your landlord cannot legally raise your rent more than the yearly increase in Turkey's wholesale price index. Aydat, the Kapıcı, and Yönetici Aydat (pronounced like "eye-dot"). It is a monthly payment which covers common area lighting, cleaning, elevator maintenance, and the salary of the kapıcı (kah-puh-juh), if there is one. The kapıcı (literally translated "door man") looks after the building and maintains it. He will almost always live on the ground floor of the apartment. He may also do additional duties like paying your utility bills, getting you a loaf of bread and a paper in the morning, and even fixing things in your house for a small fee. The main thing you would need to be careful of when dealing with the kapıcı is asking him to do things which are beyond his expertise. For example, your kapıcı is not a car mechanic (if he could fix cars, he wouldn't be a kapıcı!). For work which requires a professional, such as electrical work, hire a professional. The yönetici (yuh-neh-tee-jee, manager) is a resident who collects the aydat and makes the required payments. Utilities The landlord will sometimes keep the utilities in his or her name, since there is no penalty or impact on one's credit rating for non-payment. The utility is simply shut off, and a fine is paid to restore it. If you get the utilities in your name, you can pay them at various banks or at the Turkish post office (PTT). On the back of your utility bills is a list of places where you can pay them. Some of the banks only take these payments in the morning or afternoon hours, depending on their policy. The water bill needs to be paid at the water department at the belediye (beh-leh-dee-yeh), or municipality. You can have your utility bills automatically paid by your Turkish bank account. To do this, go to your bank and take your utility bills with you, so they can arrange for automatic payments. You can also give the bills and the required cash to your kapıcı and have them pay them for you-this is a common practice in Turkish apartment complexes. Most every city and town also has a consolidated bill-paying shop. For a small fee, you can pay all of your utilities there, at one time. Other Notes If you're single, you may find that some Turkish landlords won't rent to you. Don't take it personally. Some Turks are rather traditional, and don't want to rent to anyone but a married couple or a family. See Also Furnishing and Equipping Your Home: A guide to finding white goods (appliances), furniture, and other helpful equipment for setting up your home in Turkey. Renting in Turkey Forum: Our forum devoted to renting apartments or properties in Turkey. If you have a question, please ask it there. Guide to Turkish Terms for Buying or Renting Property External Links www.sahibinden.com (sahibinden means "from the owner," but you'll also see property companies advertising there as well. Look for "Emlak" (real estate, or property) and "Konut" (Residence) www.hurriyetemlak.com: Look for "Konut" (Residence). It has English listings. www.milliyetemlak.com: This one has English listings also. www.turkstat.gov.tr: Here you can find the Producer Price Index (PPI) for Turkey. If your landlord wants to increase the limit, it cannot exceed the percent change in the PPI by law. Ken Grubb As a special investigator for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and teacher for the University of Maryland, Ken Grubb has lived and worked in Turkey since 1997. He now lives in Antalya, where he researches and writes guides to help others live skillfully in Turkey.
    4 points
  24. as012a2568

    Moving to turkey soon

    Just like Ibrahim Ali we live in a village location. Not far from Bozcaada island our house overlooks the sea with a main town 22 km away and Canakkale around 70 km away. It means that we can get a flight to either Ankara or Istanbul fairly easily if we want to travel overseas but we have settled her permanently so we don't have to worry about visas or residency permits etc. One thing that Ibrahim Ali has already pointed out and something which is very important. You really do need to speak Turkish if you want to live in a Turkish village. Our village is a bit remote and if we have Turkish friends from Canakkale come to visit us for the first time they are a bit surprised to find that when they park up in the village square all eyes are on them and they are watched with interest until I turn up to meet them. The one big upside about living in a village is that you are much more readily accepted as one of the locals if you live there, adopt a local name, speak the language and integrate with the community. This level of acceptance is unlikely to take place in a big town or city in the same way as it does in a small community. Although the village we live in might seem a little remote we are near the very touristic island of Bozcaada but we also have our own wonderful sandy beach at the bottom of the hill which gets local tourists from Istanbul and we live in an unspoiled area of Turkey in a region which is much cheaper than the tourist resorts. This has already been mentioned but you will need a car if you live in a Turkish village. We bought a new car when we first arrived but we hardly use it now. We have acquired one of those BMC ( Leyland Sherpa van - A la Turkish style ) flatbed pickups ( Kamyonet ) for around £2000 ( 2200 Euro or $2500 ) and then spent another TL2000 bringing up to tip top condition ( New tyres all round, new radiator, service, cv joint, track rod ends, etc etc - basically changed anything that was not in good condition ). Parts and insurance are cheap for these vehicles since they are made in Turkey and we bomb around everywhere in it. They are robust and ideal for village life which is why almost every village in Turkey has them. Anyway, some great advice from Ken, JustinM and Ibrahim Ali - Take a look at Ayvacik and Cunda Island as mentioned - You might find that is more to your liking albeit as Ibrahim has mentioned the water is colder than the south coast.
    4 points
  25. academylin

    Turkish Mythology

    Thanks Aston and Cayaholic for your comments on our dog Asena! We knew we were on our way here and bringing the new puppy, so wanted a Turkish name, there was nothing more appropriate:FYI: she is named after this myth...... NOT the belly dancer, although she is quite nimble!?:)AsenaIn the mythology of the Turkic and Mongolian peoples, the wolf is a revered animal. The shamanic Turkic peoples even believed they were descendants of wolves. The legend of Asena is an old Turkic myth that tells of how the Turkic people were created. In Northern China a small Turkic village was raided by Chinese soldiers, but one small baby was left behind. An old she-wolf with a sky-blue mane named Asena found the baby and nursed him, then the she-wolf gave birth to half-wolf, half-human cubs, from whom the Turkic people were born. Also in Turkic mythology it is believed that a gray wolf showed the Turks the way out of their legendary homeland Ergenekon, which allowed them to spread and conquer their neighbours.[6][7] In modern Turkey this myth inspired extreme-right nationalist groups known as "Grey Wolves". As with most ancient peoples' beliefs, the wolf was thought to possess spiritual powers, and that parts of its body retained specific powers that could be used by people for various needs.
    4 points
  26. TURKS HAVE A SAYING FOR EVERY OCCASION. These expressions serve as bookends to each conversation, providing a handy and automatic beginning and end to every human interaction. They’re adages that serve as social glue, meaning you’ll never find a Turk who’s lost for words, even in the most unexpected circumstances. http://matadornetwork.com/abroad/30-awesome-turkish-expressions/
    4 points
  27. Just want to clarify that burglary is stealing from a dwelling, either while occupied or unoccupied, whereas robbery is stealing from a person by force or threat of force. When I lived in Izmir burglaries were more common. In some cases the burglars would use the very bars and cages on balconies to reach unprotected balconies above, where in summer the doors were unlocked or open. A friend of mine once awoke in his bed to find a man reaching over him for his wallet. The burglar ran and scrambled over the balcony and climbed down as fast as he could. Unfortunately for the burglar, my friend's gravity-assisted toolbox made the descent a lot faster than he could. I remember walking past a building with an apartment on like the fourth or fifth floor which had been burgled, with people looking up and saying "how in the world did anyone get up there?" I've heard of other similar cases. I always live on the top floor and have a steel door which I keep fully-locked. Yet the burglars have even found a way to deal with that. They go to a floor and ring the bells with a pretense. Once the find nobody is home they start working on one of the doors. Whenever the elevator moves they watch the numbers to see if the elevator is coming. If it is arriving at the floor they're on the run down the stairs. Then there is the "door swarm." Some nice lady rings your bell, and when you open the door she and two other ladies rush in. While one distracts you the other two go in other directions swiping whatever is handy, then they run out in a flurry. One of the main reasons a security guard at the gate and one doing random patrols is a good idea. That and cameras record who is coming and going, and anyone who seems suspicious is noticed, and questioned. It increases the probability of being identified and arrested. Security is like this old story. Two campers were suddenly awaken by a ferocious bear. Both campers were barefoot, and one of them started putting on a pair of running shoes. The second asked, incredulously, "what are you doing? We have to outrun the bear!" And the first one said "I don't have to outrun the bear. I just have to outrun you." There is no "100% security," but the harder target you are, the more likely a burglar, or any other criminal, will go for an easier target. I think having security present, with entry control, goes a long way to make a place a harder target. I wrote a few articles about crime and safety in Turkey if anyone is interested.
    4 points
  28. While I was staying in Adana, I went to Incirlik Alley, which is just outside Incirlik Air Base. It's normally a very busy place, with local Turks selling anything that can be sold to military personnel. It also has a lot of bars, discos, and restaurants. The Alley currency is the US Dollar (Turkish Lira is also accepted, of course). It its heyday, the shops, bars, and restaurants were open until 2:00 AM, and were sometimes quite crowded. Unfortunately because of the recent threat condition, Incirlik has been in lock-down for about a year and a half now, so the local merchants' customers have completely disappeared. I wanted to see what the Alley was like these days. Practically everything is closed. Most of the old places were there, like Incirlik Coin, Copper Ali's, Smiley's Disco, Falcon Bar, Moonlight and Royal Restaurants, Great Wall Chinese Restaurant, and Woody Woodpecker Furniture. All closed with their interiors collecting dust. Here are some photos I took of The Alley as it is today. The Entrance. Pop's Leather and Abe's Carpets. I remember Blue Angel Bar, Paris Leather World has appeared since I was there. Spent a lot of time at Cheers myself. Everybody who has ever been to Incirlik knows Copper Ali's! Deja Vu Bar, which appeared a few years after I left Incirlik back in 2006 or so. Deja Vu. I could swear I have seen this before. Falcon Bar. One of my other hangouts. They had fantastic chicken wings. The Chinese restaurant, Great Wall, had a chef from China. The food was excellent. I heard they relocated to Adana. I couldn't find it, my friend said he thought it had closed. If you're in Adana and see it's still open, go there for the best Chinese food around. The Huğlu Shotgun Shop. Military people would often buy fine Turkish shotguns, often engraved with their names on them. The shop also has a partner in Texas which has a federal firearms license, so they can mail the shotgun to them, and have them forward it to the customer. A great shop with a great reputation. And they're still open. And serving tea. If you're interested in buying a shotgun in Turkey, here is their contact info: Çukurova Av ve Spor LTD. ŞTI Yeni Mahalle Atatürk Caddesi No: 39/A Incirlik/Sarıçam/ADANA Tel: +90 322 346 7182 Web: www.curkurovaav.com.tr Here are some shots (no pun intended) of the interior. Not much going on at Incirlik. Now there's a supermarket there for those living in the apartments in the village. Great Wall Chinese Restaurant. All the military guys used to get their unit "challenge coins" made here. They also make fantastic plaques and shadow boxes for retiring military personnel. I am sure they still do that, it's just their walk-in business that has suffered. The door was still open and there was somebody there. I ate many a meal at the Moonlight Restaurant. They were popular for hail and farewell lunches. Rooster! Rooster's patch shop is still open, and Rooster's still there. He remembered me as soon as I walked in. The Turks have an incredible ability to remember someone they've met before, it's uncanny. Rooster's patch shop interior. He can make any kind of patch imaginable. The Royal Restaurant was also a great place to eat. If you needed any kind of furniture made, Woody Woodpecker could do it. You could just show them a page from a catalogue and they could reproduce it at a much lower price. Because of the relatively high weight allowance US military personnel had, they would often have furniture made at Woody Woodpecker and then ship it back to the states when they left. And for carpets? Go to Yellow Star. Well, not now of course.
    4 points
  29. I recently stayed with a friend in Adana, in a downtown area called Cemalpaşa. It's here: It was a very nice, upscale shopping district, which reminded me of the Alsancak district in Izmir. My friend had a two-bedroom apartment there, and said he was paying 750 TL a month for it. Just a regular apartment with nothing fancy. Here are some photos of the district: While there, we also went to the M-1 Shopping Mall which is here: They had expanded the M-1 Mall a lot, it was huge! Here are some photos: Enjoy the photos. For some of my older ones, including the local sights like the archaeological museum and the Sabancı Mosque, see the Adana Photo Galleries.
    4 points
  30. You seem like a smart girl. I think you should take our advice & RUN....don't walk away from that situation. Ken has lived/worked many, many years in Turkey...including touristy areas. This is a common scheme used for many years. No matter how sad the sob story. As stated...no self-respecting Turkish man will ask a woman for money...especially a Turkish girl. That's a trick reserved especially for foreigners. 99% of the time its a scam, although not all the guys are bad news. I have many Turkish friends who are honorable & rather spend their last lira trying to impress a girl than asking a girl for money. Besides, do you really want a guy w/all those personal issues? Broke. Paying alimony for many years to come? No funds to take care of you, take you out to dinner? If your Dad knows what up...he'll (hopefully) tell you the same. Many Turks don't make much monthly money...you will be paying for everything....aka relationship suicide. I just returned from Turkey 2 weeks ago...while on holiday I got laugh after laugh watching the local guys hit on the foreign girls. That's just a game & they have been playing it for a long time. Don't get played/fooled by their tactics! Avoid at all costs. -Phil
    4 points
  31. I don't think any of us can tell you the average age of buildings in Istanbul. Maybe the IBB has that information. As to your other questions, provided a person legally owns (has a tapu in their name) an apartment in a building that is to be knocked down and rebuilt, they will be paid an agreed amount by the developer for moving expenses and rent for the period it takes to rebuild. How much and for how long will be determined in negotiations made and specified in the contract. Usually owners don't need to pay more money for the new apartment, unless of course this is negotiated with the developer because, for example. the new apartments will be bigger. However, if an owner doesn't agree to having the building knocked down and redeveloped, and they are in the minority, their apartment will be offered for sale to the other owners. If the other owners don't want to buy it, TOKI takes it over and auctions it off. This only happens if a person absolutely refuses to agree to the redevelopment but the majority of home owners want it.
    4 points
  32. Coriander is not known much.. Only some local folks appreciate it, like the Southestern Anatolia people.. But it occupies a very important place in Antakya cuisine, and let me share a secret with you: if there is no coriander in the famous Antakya dürümü (stuffed rolls), it is never an Antakya dürümü in the real sense! Sure, the paste of a local variety a red pepper shouldn't be ignored. Coriander, or Coriandrum sativum, is called 'kişniş' in Turkey: Kishnish. As far as I know, only its seeds are used. It has a unique and strong aroma. Maybe because of this, it is not so widely used as maybe expected, considering its health benefits. Yes, its essential oil has antibacterial and antifungal features.. Other benefits are pronounced as well, and there is some literature about that, if you are interested in it, I'm sure you can find some reliable material, as I found.. As to its antimicrobial features, I guess this is why the Southeastern people use it, the region is hot, and local people love to eat meat.. Coriander seems to protect the meat.. But what is more important than this, its antimicrobial features help bowels keep the intestinal flora in balance.. Where to find? If you cannot find it at your local supermarket, try herbal shops, but try to find the product of the current season. How to use? if just for taste, you can add it into sauces, as seeds , when it was boiled , but for health benefits, grinding and adding it into food or sauces as raw, small particles is better.. You can even chew it, as I do..well, not much enjoyable but it worths..
    4 points
  33. My wife and I have been using Duolingo for about 4 weeks and thoroughly recommend it. there are a few issues with it requiring American English replies but all in all it is excellent.
    4 points
  34. I would also advise caution. Too many stories of heartbreak out there. I think that dialog is required about specific details of a possible visit, especially where he would have to put himself out a bit.
    4 points
  35. Near the sea of course, but of course that would depend on the height of the building too. So it could probably be most anywhere, since Alanya kind of stretches out along the sea shore. I like Alanya and I always look forward to visiting it, the beach is always nearby, and are fantastic, with sandy beaches instead of pebble beaches. I would recommend renting first, because what seems like a great place might not seem so great after you've been there for a few months. Plus it will give you a feel for the city. I think the best way is to get to know some of the local expats, and get recommendations. Typically in any town, certain estate agents develop a good reputation with the foreigners there. The only thing to look out for is those who are helping you to get a commission from the agent, since estate agents will often pay a commission even to a foreigner who brings in a customer who buys. It will take some time to get around and get to know the local expats, so don't be in too much of a hurry. If you rent for a year, you'll have plenty of time to learn who is who, and which agents are trustworthy.
    4 points
  36. In 2007 I was stuck in a rut in a nicely paid but stressful job working for a huge American company in France. On the outside things looked good - good pay, stock options, company car, etc. On the inside I was bored, stressed and fed up with EBITA, ROI and quarterly earning reports - money is not everything. To cut a long story short I threw in the job, we sold the house, sold off all of our belongings which wouldn't fit in the car, stuffed everythng into my partner's old Xantia, the dog on top and we set off for a new life in Turkey! My parents were appalled and bewildered when I announced that we had bought an old cave house in Cappadocia and were moving to open a guesthouse (I think they still haven't come to terms with it yet and I do admit it was a wild move but sometimes you have to throw caution to the winds and take risks. And sometimes you get burnt as we found out! But heck, life is short). More in the next thrilling episode (if it interests anybody).
    4 points
  37. Mersin has now 14 private fully licensed Arabic school where Arabic is the main teaching language for kids from kindergarten until high school. These schools teach Arabic, English and Turkish and mainly they serve Syrian students and other Arab students. These schools were set up by Syrian businessmen who moved to Turkey because of the civil war raging in Syria nowadays, they started new life in Mersin and with it new schools, shops , restaurants and other related businesses. * Pictures are from Success Way private school in Mezitli / Mersin
    4 points
  38. Any type of RP, except student RP, can be used to accrue your 5 yrs towards an application for citizenship. You do not have to be a property owner either.
    4 points
  39. Sarah

    Talked Online...Mistake?

    Sorry but 98 percent of mens allways make trouble!! ken and greenstein are right.. What can he able to do with you!!?nothing at all! So don't worry ..but remember this experience for your future ..being friend in net and fall in love in this virtual environment is FALSE..so be carefull you don't know who's his parents..who is he exactly..these kind of connection aren't safe at all actually in the real world and around yourself you'll be find a person who will loves you honestly ..you don't need to this kind of loves!that's it ..all of them are just a lie.. now just smile and back to your life and be happY honey
    4 points
  40. I would say this sounds something exactly out of Turkish TV series or you have to give him credit for having a wild imaginary mind to come up with this story. I would not believe him one bit but that is just me. I am sure what happened what his family liked you because they knew you were just temporarily and he had his finance in Turkey. Sorry to have this happened to you but I am glad you only invested in him 7 months and not years.
    4 points
  41. Hi everyone. I'm gonna keep this brief - some of you may already know my story but basically. I met my other half in Marmaris, yes the typical English girl meets barman/manager falls in love and wants to leave on the next flight to Turkey for good. Well life isn't that simple is it! Almost 3 years on and no permanent UK visa (whoever says it's easy to get one is lying!) 2 years to get a Turkish divorce after being told several different things. Not being able to give notice of marriage after being told you can't on a visitor visa (another misleading comment). Then finally finding a registry office that will accept it and booking a wedding less then 3 weeks ago! Me and my lovely man tied the knot! It was the best day ever!! and to make things even better our little boy is due in less then 4 weeks! Finally get to be a family! I'm now a Danış (which means information haha!) Visa issues still going on but we are now husband and wife!! Fight for the things you love, follow your heart but use your head! Lindy xx
    4 points
  42. Excellent and Good Turkish Websites to learn Turkish There are several excellent and very good websites to learn Turkish. My favourites are as follows: www.turkishteatime.com EXCELLENT WEBSITE www.turkishbasics.comwww.turkishfree.webs.comwww.onlineturkish.comwww.princeton.edu/~turkish/reading1.htmlwww.turkishlanguage.co.uk EXCELLENT WEBSITEwww.ielanguages.comwww.worldstories.org.uk (click on TURKISH)www.turkishclass.comwww.totally-turkish.com
    4 points
  43. Fil

    parenting tv programme

    Number 1 calf and her student friends found this little programme about UK/Turkey teenagers. Thought you might find it interesting.
    4 points
  44. Look at this with your head not your heart - easy to say I know. He is 45, that means he was born in 1968, his mother is Indian let us assume she was 20 when he was born, this means she was born in 1948 - India was coming to terms with their Independence. It was a poor country and undeveloped - not a lot of people travelled abroad , only 'privileged' people could afford to to travel. Let us assume his father married a 'privileged' Indian woman - now Indians are very particular about education and I am sure that if he had an Indian mother (or father) education (of their children)would be paramount. he would NOT be working as a 'restaurant manager' Incidentally I am ethnic Indian
    4 points
  45. I was with an abuser years ago and he was American. I'm now married to a Turk and he loves, respects and honors me. So don't put it on the ethnicity of the guy to control you.
    4 points
  46. The following is quoted from the British Embassy in Ankara facebook pages posted today 2 July 2013: "Changes to SGK regulations: It is no longer compulsory for foreign nationals to join the SGK health scheme. Those wishing to join may do so after one year of residency in Turkey with a residence permit. All foreign nationals who have been residing longer than a year will also be eligible to apply and payments will start from the date of application. Payments will not be back dated. The only time when a foreign national will be able to cease membership, or withdraw their application from SGK, is when they decide to leave Turkey to return to their country or if they join an official health scheme (e.g. NHS). If leaving Turkey on a permanent basis an individual must surrender their residence permit to the Foreigners Police Department and write a letter to their SGK office informing them that they are leaving the country. On joining an official health scheme a letter proving membership of the scheme must be submitted to the SGK office."
    4 points
  47. Jim--This is my first experience with a Turkish woman, and I am sure they are all not the same. However, from what I have seen from Seda and her friends, they will usually have good core values as far as Marriage, being faithful and taking care of their husbands go. Seda is wonderful in every way possible, in the limited time we had together she showed her absolute love and loyalty. Of course it is nice that I think she is absolutely beautiful. I am truly a lucky man. The best part is she is her own independent, smart, and strong woman. She is very sweet and warm but will not hesitate to keep me behaving well . If you are looking for a woman who you can kind of control (in a bad way), a Turkish woman is not the one for you. Apparently women from the Black Sea Region (my girlfriend) are notoriously STRONG women--not like physically strong--but confident and independent. Of course I show her the utmost respect, but she is not shy to scold me about something (I think it's good to be challenged by someone). The best part? I am visiting Turkey in January!!!!!!!!!!! This will be the first time that Seda and I have been together since October of 2012. I don't know if we would have made it without Skype every day and Whatsapp. It's amazing that I trust her more than any of my previous girlfriends, and she is in a different continent! I will be flying on Turkish Airlines into Istanbul. We will visit Istanbul and her college city of Izmir, as well as some other attractions. I am so excited, I almost can't contain myself. A quick note about your "not being very religious" comment--I was raised Christian (but never felt very religious); I had no idea about Islam. I am very interested in religion too and by the time I graduated college, Islam was pretty much the only one I hadn't explored. Without getting into too much detail-- I have never been this happy and I strongly recommend you look into Islam--just be careful the source where you get your information. Also, check out Turkish girls =) They are the best, in my opinion =D Also--I have lived in America my entire life and I am of Scottish, Welsh and English descent. I don't know my exact genealogy though. How about you--are you pursuing a Turkish woman? What is your nationality?
    4 points
  48. Hello all, This is a very interesting handbook I've found online written by the National Middle East Resource Center. It contains advice on learning Turkish. It's some common sense advice but it's also one of the most well thought out and clear guides that I've read before. It takes you through the thought behind how best to learn Turkish in many different settings, though it's really for people taking Turkish in a class structure for the most part. It doesn't necessarily provide new information, just a really new way of looking at how you're learning and how you approach Turkish. I thought I would share it with you all since it was rather helpful for me and made me think about what I was doing and how I could make my study of Turkish more effective and fun at the same time. Here's the link: http://nmelrc.org/documents/Handbooks/TurkishHandbook.pdf (Note: It's a PDF so it might take a bit to load, though it's only 34 pages so it's not one of those massive things.)
    4 points
  49. Meral

    GBP & USD up against TL !

    Just noticed the value of both GBP & USD has shot up against the lira. GBP currently worth 3.0040 TL & USD is up to 1.9424 TL. This is good news for those members with income sourced from those countries ! Unfortunately no change in AUD -- still 1.7847 TL ...... it's been a bit higher in the past, even higher than USD, but things have changed. These figures are from http://www.exchange-rates.org/ & may vary of course.
    4 points
  50. Vic801

    Lord Of The Dance

    Just thought I would share this funny experience with you. We have a friend who has a guesthouse in Urgup just next to a school. Her guesthouse has a lovely shaded flowered courtyard where it would be very pleasant to sit out were it not for the repeated metallic renderings of "Für Elise" from the school opposite, at various intervals of the day. However we were having lunch with her and a Turkish friend when suddenly the crackle of the loudspeakers made me anticipate the dreaded mind-grating "Für Elise", but to my surprise we were treated to a 30 second burst of some sort of Turkish folk song. I asked our friend what that was and she told me that now there were different excerpts of various music throughout the day. This sounded like a major improvement to me and had apparently been imposed by our AKP mayor. Throughout our lunch we had several of these outbursts, each with different selections of music, although none of us could work out what sort of timimg or class change this could correspond to (13.00, 13.20, 13:45 ?????) It was the 14:10 song that killed me - suddenly we got a full blast a full minute and a half of "Lord of the Dance"! And after I had finished choking and snorting out my red cabbage (I don't recommend snorting red cabbage through the nose), I sang along to my fellow-guests' delight: Dance, dance, wherever you may be I am the Lord of the dance, said He And I lead you all, wherever you may be And I lead you all in the dance, said He I danced in the morning when the world was young I danced in the moon and the stars and the sun I came down from heaven and I danced on the earth At Bethlehem I had my birth and further verses go on with bits like: I danced on the Sabbath and I cured the lame The holy people said it was a shame They ripped, they stripped, they hung me high Left me there on the cross to die Unfortunately my audience was unforgiving since the irony of this was lost one them - 1 Swiss, 1 French, 1 Turkish, so I wiped the remains of the red cabbage off my T-shirt as I pathetically tried to translate some of this joyous moment but was force-fed fed yoghurt and pekmez (apparently the panacea for this type of red-cabbage-induced hallucination). But I swear it was "Lord of the Dance", I'll hang out afternoons until it plays and I'll tape it for you because it really was!
    4 points
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