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  1. 3 points
    as012a2568

    Moving to turkey soon

    Just like Ibrahim Ali we live in a village location. Not far from Bozcaada island our house overlooks the sea with a main town 22 km away and Canakkale around 70 km away. It means that we can get a flight to either Ankara or Istanbul fairly easily if we want to travel overseas but we have settled her permanently so we don't have to worry about visas or residency permits etc. One thing that Ibrahim Ali has already pointed out and something which is very important. You really do need to speak Turkish if you want to live in a Turkish village. Our village is a bit remote and if we have Turkish friends from Canakkale come to visit us for the first time they are a bit surprised to find that when they park up in the village square all eyes are on them and they are watched with interest until I turn up to meet them. The one big upside about living in a village is that you are much more readily accepted as one of the locals if you live there, adopt a local name, speak the language and integrate with the community. This level of acceptance is unlikely to take place in a big town or city in the same way as it does in a small community. Although the village we live in might seem a little remote we are near the very touristic island of Bozcaada but we also have our own wonderful sandy beach at the bottom of the hill which gets local tourists from Istanbul and we live in an unspoiled area of Turkey in a region which is much cheaper than the tourist resorts. This has already been mentioned but you will need a car if you live in a Turkish village. We bought a new car when we first arrived but we hardly use it now. We have acquired one of those BMC ( Leyland Sherpa van - A la Turkish style ) flatbed pickups ( Kamyonet ) for around £2000 ( 2200 Euro or $2500 ) and then spent another TL2000 bringing up to tip top condition ( New tyres all round, new radiator, service, cv joint, track rod ends, etc etc - basically changed anything that was not in good condition ). Parts and insurance are cheap for these vehicles since they are made in Turkey and we bomb around everywhere in it. They are robust and ideal for village life which is why almost every village in Turkey has them. Anyway, some great advice from Ken, JustinM and Ibrahim Ali - Take a look at Ayvacik and Cunda Island as mentioned - You might find that is more to your liking albeit as Ibrahim has mentioned the water is colder than the south coast.
  2. 3 points
    mamish

    Köyceğiz

    We also ran away from Bodrum after experiencing it for 18 months! And we looked for anywhere off the Bodrum Peninsula! We live in one of the small villages about 10km from Koycegiz and find it perfect. Koycegiz itself is growing fast - mostly Turkish escaping the cities - and becoming more crowded, although for many it is still considered a quiet small town. In actual fact, Koycegiz does not have a large expat population - probably not as many as Dalyan which I consider very touristy in summer and too quiet in winter, with many places closed. And nowhere near the level of Bodrum, or even Fethiye and Marmaris! Koycegiz is a market town that is active all year round and we go there for shopping or a meal out by the lake - there is also a beach if you want to swim in the lake or go caneoing, etc. One of the benefits of being in this area is that we are away from the main tourist areas and yet within easy reach if we want the "city" - one hour to Fethiye in one direction, or Marmaris in the other, and one hour from the capital Mugla, 40 mins to Dalaman airport. We have the beauty of the lake, which I swim in all year round, many close by beaches, and the thermal pools and mud baths which we visit at least once a week throughout the year. And I haven't noticed too many mosquitoes! We have been here five years now and wouldn't consider moving - even though we're a bit off the beaten track (the more off the better as far as I'm concerned!) Good luck to you in your search!
  3. 3 points
    The Daily Sabah featured one of our members in their "Legendary Expat Series." His name is Martin Redman. He goes by the name of "REDDERS" on Turkey Central, but he is more widely known as "Doc Martin" because of his Facebook group, "Doc Martin's Surgery for Expats." Martin is widely known for his work in sorting out those things expats need to know in Turkey, and his ability to explain complex issues in terms people can understand. I can personally attest to his painstaking attention to detail when it comes to providing correct information. And I am grateful to have Martin as a member of our community. You can read more about Martin in this Daily Sabah article: Legendary Expat Series: Meet Martin Redman Congratulations, Martin, for being recognized as a Legendary Expat. You truly deserve it!
  4. 2 points
    IbrahimAbi

    Buying meat

    You can save quite a lot of money (and, some would say be more healthy) by adding up to 20% (moist weight) soya eti to your kıyma if making Köfte. You really cannot tell the difference in taste and you will get more Köfte for your money. I used to buy it in Migros, but have not seen it for a while. https://urun.n11.com/gurme-urunler/gdo-suz-naturel-soya-kiymasi-1-kgsafir-gidaucretsiz-kargo-P225500481
  5. 2 points
    as012a2568

    Buying meat

    Selam Star, Nice to see someone from Azerbaijan in the forum. You won't have any problem with Turkish obviously :-) I hope to visit Baku next year. I am guessing that I should be able to converse normally in Turkish over there. I heard that a few words might be different but that essentially it is the same. Anyway, the meat. I don't think there is such a thing as a standard price for meat in Turkey, not one that is adhered to anyways. The good stores like Migros and Kipa or Uysal in our area probably offer the best cuts but tend to be a little more expensive. It is pretty much trial and error in finding a good butcher or the person who sells the best chicken etc. Certainly kusbasi at 55 lira and Kiyma at 48 lira would be a bit expensive where we are but then we are not in Istanbul. Hoscakalin Ingiliz Hamdi
  6. 2 points
    as012a2568

    Shipping all my goods to Turkey?

    We brought all our personal goods into Turkey 3 years ago. We shipped it from the UK but we were careful not to include any electrical items. Also we labelled each box carefully and had a packing list which listed all the contents of each box in both Turkish and in English. Suffice to say that we had absolutely no problem at all with customs. We paid no import taxes. I think the trick is to avoid electrical items. Our personal effects included some quite large items of furniture without any issues at all. However, when it comes to cars I seriously would buy one here rather than import one. Also electrical goods and white goods in general are reasonably priced and not much different to what you would pay in Europe.
  7. 2 points
    JustinM

    Buying meat

    Star, I agree with everything Ken said. However, your butcher depends on the economic status of your neighborhood. If in a working class neighborhood, the butcher will only carry certain types and of a certain quality to ensure his profit. If you go to Sazeli in Florya you will have a hard time not having some of the best meat you've ever eaten. Now, it does come at a price, but you can get American cuts of dry aged Prime Beef. Etiler, Besiktas, Yesilkoy, and other affluent neighborhoods will offer these types of offerings. I will add though, that if you are looking for Ground Beef (Dana Kiyma) or Ground Lamb (Kuzu Kiyma) these working class neighborhoods are the best. The fat to meat ratio is a little higher, and that's what lends its traditional flavor. Here is a link to Hurriyet Newspaper with a list of Turkey's Top 10 Butchers. Open in Google Chrome and Set page to Translate. It won't make a lot of sense, but you can at least get the address and try a couple out if you wish. http://www.hurriyet.com.tr/kelebek/hurriyet-cumartesi/turkiyenin-en-iyi-10-kasabi-36920484 Lastly, I've found that you just have to search and try for yourself. Because everywhere you go you will hear "bizim et daha iyi" meaning our meat is better. I had a Chef friend in New York tell me one time, don't go to a French Restaurant and order Italian and don't go to a Chinese Restaurant and order a steak, you'll be disappointed. Stick to what they do best. Same with the butchers shop, find out what they do best and go there for that alone. Probably more than you needed to know, but hopefully it helps! Cheers, Justin
  8. 2 points
    Ken Grubb

    Who is responsible for repairs?

    Let us know how it goes. It isn't like the USA. Many landlords, for anything inside the apartment, will do nothing and expect the tenant to fix it. However, I'll echo what has already been said... If it is part of what you are renting, like the electrical fixtures, or something outside of the apartment and part of the structure, like the solar water heater, they are supposed to fix it. In reference to the notification letter, if you need legal proof that the landlord has been notified, this is done by a noter (notary). According to your instructions, they draw up a letter of notification about the problem and that they need to fix it. When they notarize it, it becomes part of the official record. Then the noter puts the letter into an envelope and sends it to the officially-registered address of the landlord, by taahhutlu posta (registered mail). In this way, both the delivery, and also the contents of the letter in the envelope, can be legally proven. That is why the noter mails the letter and not you. It makes it impossible for the landlord to say they weren't notified of the problem. Hopefully it won't come to that. I mention it because if you just make a phone call or send them a regular letter yourself, the landlord may say that they never got a phone call or a letter. I recall that when I was working at a military base in Turkey, the Turkish lawyer there was of the opinion that, if the landlord has been legally notified of the problem and fails to take action, you can then send copies of your receipts to them and deduct the amount of your expenses from the rent you are paying. In my (non-lawyer) opinion this wouldn't require another legal notification since you will have the original receipts if there is any question about the lower amount of rent that month. I hope that helps... good luck in straightening this out.
  9. 2 points
    IbrahimAbi

    Who is responsible for repairs?

    It is up to the agent to chase the landlord. Go to see the agent and be assertive. If this fails I believe you can serve the landlord a letter which has been notarised, to request the repairs within a reasonable time.
  10. 2 points
    JustinM

    Who is responsible for repairs?

    Baje, If this an issue internal to the home and was not created by you, then it is the homeowners responsibility. It may take some assertiveness and working through the agent to get it resolved, but my experience is to have the landlord send their own person out and fix. Otherwise, they will claim you hired someone who was doing it dishonestly, that there was not a problem, and they are not paying. There are Turkish Tenant Laws, but Turks rarely pursue through the courts and therefore many landlords are not concerned with the basic rights of the tenant. Stick to your guns, tell them to send their own electrician, work through the agent, and if all else fails contact an attorney. Rates are rather affordable compared to US standards. A simple notification should be enough to get them to act. It's sad, but this is all too common, that's why you see most Turks buy at all costs necessary.
  11. 2 points
    JustinM

    Shipping all my goods to Turkey?

    Lastly, I would consider buying products locally. Furniture can be purchased rather cheaply here in Turkey and many US Electronics will not function unless you have a converter. Even then, the possibility of damaging those items for good is high. Not to mention shipping costs, transport in Turkey, customs, and the stress and headache that goes along with it. In fact, if you are looking at Antalya, many of the homes in the region will be acequately furnished for beginning life in Turkey. Your choice, but if I were to do it again, I would start fresh.... Long response, but it's always better to have enough information to make the proper decision. All the best and Turkiye Hosgeldiniz!
  12. 2 points
    JustinM

    Shipping all my goods to Turkey?

    If you are planning to stay in Turkey for more than 90 days within a 180-day period, for any reason, including tourism, you must get a Turkish residence permit. In order to obtain a residence permit, please schedule an online appointment at Directorate General of Migration Management’s website before you contact Provincial Directorates of Migration Management Office in your area. You can obtain sworn affidavit notarials for original U.S. birth certificates for the purpose of getting residence permits by scheduling a notarial appointment. There is no need for the minor to appear, one parent with the original copy of the US Birth Certificate with the parent’s ID will suffice for a sworn affidavit . The U.S. Embassy strongly urges U.S Citizens not to overstay their visas and to maintain valid residence permits at all times. Turkish authorities do enforce the laws, including those stipulating fines, deportation, and bans on future travel to Turkey for people who overstay their visas or do not maintain valid residency permits. If you stay beyond the date your visa or residence permit expires, even if only for a few days, you will be fined at the port of exit and will be subject to a travel ban preventing you from re-entering Turkey for a period between three months and five years (depending on the length of your overstay). Monthly fines for overstaying Turkish visas or residency permits add up quickly. Travelers are encouraged to check with local authorities to ensure compliance with all Turkish immigration regulations. U.S. citizens who have overstayed their visas, residence permits, or visa exempt periods and are subject to a fine can also benefit from the residence permit procedure as long as they pay the related fines. If you are a tourist and want to stay longer in Turkey U.S. citizens who enter Turkey with a tourist visa obtained at a Turkish Embassy or Consulate or who buy a tourist visa stamp at an airport or other port of entry or who are exempt from getting tourist visas, and who wish to stay in Turkey for tourism purposes longer than 90 days, are able to get a tourist residence permit for a maximum period of six months by scheduling an online appointment for e-residency applications at e-ikamet.goc.gov.tr for Provincial Directorates of Migration Management Offices. The six month residence permit plus the 90-day initial entry permit will allow U.S. citizens to stay legally in Turkey for up to a total of 9 months. Obtaining U.S. criminal records for residence permits Information on how to obtain U.S. criminal records can be found here. Do I need health insurance to get a residence permit in Turkey? If you are obtaining residence permit, you will be required by the Turkish government to get health insurance that has coverage in Turkey. The Turkish government implemented a general health insurance law called the Social Insurance and General Health Insurance Law (GHI). You can find below some useful information and updates about the General Health Insurance Law (GHI) if you are applying for GHI in Turkey.
  13. 2 points
    JustinM

    Shipping all my goods to Turkey?

    Bringing your car into Turkey Cars in Turkey are still seen as a luxury and the prices of vehicles, taxes and fuel can seem extortionate to most foreigners. The cost of an average second hand motor can be as much as three times the price you would expect to pay in the UK or Europe. While foreigners can bring their car into Turkey for up to two years, there are rules regarding the import of foreign vehicles and, after two years, the vehicle must leave the country for at least 6 months or you face paying hefty taxes and risk the car being taken and impounded. Bringing a car to Turkey As of October 2015, visitors can bring a vehicle with a foreign number plate into Turkey for 730 days (two years). This applies to anyone (foreigner, or Turk) who resides abroad for more than 185 days in a year. If you have a residence permit, this won't apply to you as the offer is tailored to those who reside overseas. However, providing residents have spent the required number of days abroad they won't be denied entry with their foreign plate vehicle. What documents are required to bring a car to Turkey? The car's papers must be presented, and you must show that you have insurance, and a valid warrent of fitness. If the driver isn't the owner of a vehicle they will need a power of attorney. Initially, you'll be presented with a six-month permit. However, you can apply to have this extended to 730 days. Who can use the vehicle? Immediate family members are permitted to use the vehicle, provided they also live abroad. What happens if the vehicle overstays? Vehicle owners are liable to hefty fines for cars that overstay - especially after three months overstaying. Blue-plate and tax free cars We have come across exceptions to this rule with regards to those with a Turkish work permit issued by the Ministry of Labour, NATO staff, retired foreigners, diplomats and foreign press. In these cases it may be possible to either purchase a tax-free ‘blue-plate car’ or import your foreign owned car tax-free for use during your stay in Turkey. There are a number of laws and regulations surrounding this issue that are changing so please check with authorities if you believe you fall into one of the categories. We currently believe that these drivers can bring their foreign car, have it officially registered against their passport and permit providing they are the only drivers of the vehicle, and that they pay a touring tax (warranty to ensure that the car is returned to its country of origin when its touring visa has expired). These cars are often referred to as ‘blue plate cars’. If you do fall into this category do keep in mind that you may face difficulties when looking to sell your blue-plate car in Turkey as these cars can only be brought by others meeting the strict criteria. Buying a Turkish car For many ex-pats buying a Turkish car is only viable option. A foreigner with a valid license and residency should be able to buy a second hand or new Turkish car relatively easily from a dealership or privately. There are legalities and paperwork involved so, unless you have sufficient language skills, have a trusted Turkish speaker on hand to help out. You can buy most makes and models of car in Turkey. The main dealerships tend to be in the larger towns and cities so travel to these for the best car prices. Do keep in mind that parts for fancy cars and those manufactured outside Turkey can be expensive and often difficult to find, most expats choose to buy Fiats, Fords, Dacias and Renaults to keep running costs to a minimum. Once you have found your car you need to register the paperwork legally into your name. If buying from a dealership, they should walk you through the process. If buying privately you need to get the paperwork transferred legally and notarised. A check should be done on the vehicle to ensure that there is no outstanding debt registered against it, and you also need to ensure the all compulsory government taxes and insurances are paid up to date. Note: Laws in Turkey change frequently, this information was correct at the time it was published, please only take this information as advice and seek out correct information at the time.
  14. 2 points
    JustinM

    Moving to turkey soon

    Mav, Straight from the US Embassy in Ankara website. https://tr.usembassy.gov/u-s-citizen-services/local-resources-of-u-s-citizens/living-in-turkey/ If you are planning to stay in Turkey for more than 90 days within a 180-day period, for any reason, including tourism, you must get a Turkish residence permit. In order to obtain a residence permit, please schedule an online appointment at Directorate General of Migration Management’s website before you contact Provincial Directorates of Migration Management Office in your area. You can obtain sworn affidavit notarials for original U.S. birth certificates for the purpose of getting residence permits by scheduling a notarial appointment. There is no need for the minor to appear, one parent with the original copy of the US Birth Certificate with the parent’s ID will suffice for a sworn affidavit . The U.S. Embassy strongly urges U.S Citizens not to overstay their visas and to maintain valid residence permits at all times. Turkish authorities do enforce the laws, including those stipulating fines, deportation, and bans on future travel to Turkey for people who overstay their visas or do not maintain valid residency permits. If you stay beyond the date your visa or residence permit expires, even if only for a few days, you will be fined at the port of exit and will be subject to a travel ban preventing you from re-entering Turkey for a period between three months and five years (depending on the length of your overstay). Monthly fines for overstaying Turkish visas or residency permits add up quickly. Travelers are encouraged to check with local authorities to ensure compliance with all Turkish immigration regulations. U.S. citizens who have overstayed their visas, residence permits, or visa exempt periods and are subject to a fine can also benefit from the residence permit procedure as long as they pay the related fines. If you are a tourist and want to stay longer in Turkey U.S. citizens who enter Turkey with a tourist visa obtained at a Turkish Embassy or Consulate or who buy a tourist visa stamp at an airport or other port of entry or who are exempt from getting tourist visas, and who wish to stay in Turkey for tourism purposes longer than 90 days, are able to get a tourist residence permit for a maximum period of six months by scheduling an online appointment for e-residency applications at e-ikamet.goc.gov.tr for Provincial Directorates of Migration Management Offices. The six month residence permit plus the 90-day initial entry permit will allow U.S. citizens to stay legally in Turkey for up to a total of 9 months. Obtaining U.S. criminal records for residence permits Information on how to obtain U.S. criminal records can be found here. Do I need health insurance to get a residence permit in Turkey? If you are obtaining residence permit, you will be required by the Turkish government to get health insurance that has coverage in Turkey. The Turkish government implemented a general health insurance law called the Social Insurance and General Health Insurance Law (GHI). You can find below some useful information and updates about the General Health Insurance Law (GHI) if you are applying for GHI in Turkey.
  15. 2 points
    JustinM

    Moving to turkey soon

    Mav, I have been living here for a little over a year, and there has not been any sharing of bank/financial information between Turkey and the US. If you are living here in Turkey, unless you have an earned income, you will be fine. Earned is the key term. Not retirements, 401k, SS, etc. That was the interpretation given to me, and I have had no issues. Now, would I call up the IRS and say here is the scoop? Doubtful, but I have yet to and don't forsee any issue in my future. You won't be able to work unless you have citizenship or a special work permit (Which is hard to obtain), so if you are only going to be here for 6 months out of the year, you will be fine. I am a property advisor here in Turkey, but I am not trying to sell you or endorse my business, but here is a link to why we have seen a rise in property investment in Alanya. https://www.propertyturkey.com/blog-turkey/why-alanya-is-popular-with-foreign-house-buyers Alanya offers a multitude of options for home buyers. Most importantly, it is one of the more affordable areas in the region to buy outright. If you have any questions, please feel free to start a thread and I'll do my best to answer whatever you've got. Ken has great experience to share as do many others. Hope this helped a bit!
  16. 2 points
    IbrahimAbi

    Moving to turkey soon

    Have a swim before you decide. We stayed in a place called Ören, somewhere near Ayvalik (not the one near Bodrum), in fact we were there when Iraq invaded Kuwait, and the water is freezing. ( We had left Kuwait 1 month earlier so it was a bit of a shock). I seem to remember it was also freezing in Teos outside Izmir.
  17. 2 points
    Ken Grubb

    Moving to turkey soon

    I've visited Köyceğiz before, it is a lovely and quiet town. As I recall there were plenty of shade trees, which I liked a lot. Plus the promenade along the lake. I understand it isn't a touristy place like nearby Dalyan. I love Ayvalık. And the nearby Sarımsaklı Beach. It is very charming and there were few tourists. I was also considering moving there. I told a Turk about this, and he said the water is much colder there. A friend of his had gone there, supposedly even during the tourism season, and found the water too cold to swim in. Of course this is third-hand information, and I never went and stuck my foot in the water, but it's something to check on if you like to swim. Another town I love, north of Izmir, is Foça. It might be too small for a lot of people, but wow, it is a very pretty town. Ayvalık and Foça are also on the İzban route. The İzban is Izmir's metro. I don't know how long it takes to get from Izmir to Foça or Ayvalık, but it might be nice to take the train into the center of Izmir whenever you want. Besides the towns around Marmaris, I was also considering some of the towns on the peninsula near Izmir, such as Seferihisar. Seferihisar is a designated citaslow, or "slow city," where the pace of life is intentionally relaxed. Plus it's not far from Izmir. I used to live in Çeşme and I liked it a lot, but I've heard from the locals it gets incredibly crowded with tourists in the summer these days.
  18. 2 points
    Hi Ken My Turkish stepson who has had experience of working at an emlak office dealt with the buying of the apartment. He confirms what JustinM said about getting signatures and written statements for every transaction along the way. We bought the apartment in my wife's name, since she is Turkish it apparently saved on the need for bureaucratic checks on myself.
  19. 2 points
    When you are talking to an English person and they look at you blankly and you realise that you've been talking to them in Turkish. When you no longer wonder at being able to sit outside comfortably in the middle of winter. It no longer seems strange to order a new bottle of gas for your cooker. When you are calling people abi, abla, taser etc instead of using their names. When you are used to to travelling hundreds of km by coach for around 50tl (£7ish) Turkish relatives turn up at a days notice to stay a few days. You were expecting 5 but eight turn up and they stay a fortnight. Actually, I don't think I will ever get used to this one! Your Turkish visitors take over the kitchen and cooking cos they prefer it to your foreign rubbish. First time it horrified me but after that, whey hey, carry on. When you are used to seeing little children running about until the early hours of the morning.
  20. 2 points
    Sunny

    Marrying Older Women

    Sorry walter, but this isn't a dating site. Good luck with your hunt.
  21. 2 points
    raminturkey

    Moving to Turkey from the USA

    Awesome questions and answers-thank you both.
  22. 2 points
    Actually the USD/TL exchange rate will certainly work in your favor, especially if you decide to buy property. I hear some Turks saying it will get worse, that is, up to 10TL to the dollar! But who knows. It seems to me that this should correct itself over time, since if the dollar is that strong, it makes it a good time, not a bad time, to buy in Turkey. Or even just go go out to dinner. My three bedroom apartment now costs about 200 USD in rent. I'm not saying that to minimize the problems Turks are going through because of this, I am just pointing it out as fact. I have moved to a lot of foreign places, some of them not necessarily considered totally safe, and each time I had this certain feeling of foreboding. It's the fear of the unknown. And it's probably a good thing since wherever you go, you need to pay extra attention for a while until you get more familiar with the place. I mean familiar, not inattentive. Even for things like making sure you look both ways even crossing a one-way street, which is a good idea in Turkey! Just to help you isolate this, is this an overall fear you have, or do you fear something specific? What, specifically, do you think is going to happen? You may find yourself coming up short on an answer for that, so in that case you may just be feeling the normal sense of fear that comes from the unknown, and what may or may not happen in the future. I was talking to a Turkish friend of mine today. He was talking about how bad things are getting. I asked him, in what way? He started talking about politics, the government, the governments, Donald Trump, etc... I ask him how much of this affected his daily life. Like, when he woke up in the morning, went to work, did his work all day, went home, had dinner and went to bed, which of these things affected his daily life. "None of them," he said. I'm not saying that you should stop keeping track of what's going on, but I do think "the news" should be called "the bad news," since that's what it mostly is. It's also going to depend on where you live. If you live in downtown Istanbul, you're going to have the same threat of crime you have anywhere else. If you live in Kaş, you probably won't need to worry much about crime. Or if you live in a place like Fethiye with a large foreign population, you may feel a lot more at home than you would in a place where there were no foreigners. The only incidents I have heard of directed towards Americans were against American military. There is a nationalist group who got access to Incirlik Air Base during a community day. A group of them tried to put a bag over the head of one of the military members. It was a symbolic act which stems from something that happened back during the Gulf war. In Antalya, this group tried to throw some sailors into the sea shouting "Yankee go home," or something like that. Nobody died, nobody got hurt. They didn't shoot at or try to stab anybody, it was a symbol of protest. But this was directed against the US government (military). The incidents ended with nobody getting hurt. However, the carriers won't be returning to Antalya again. This kind of thing would not happen to a regular American just living in Antalya. I was thinking today, while talking to my friend, what would happen if somebody were to attack me in such a way. I can tell you that probably a dozen other Turks would run out of their shops and attack the attackers, in my defense! But even in saying this, I am magnifying these two incidents beyond what they deserve. Other than what I mentioned above, which more more symbolic in nature than anything else and resulted in no harm, I have not heard of any attacks or even any ill-will directed towards US citizens in Turkey. Antalya is a nice place to be. It's quite hot in the summer. I live in the downtown area. I don't need a car, I can get everywhere on public transportation, and everything I need is generally in walking distance. Then you have Lara and Konyaaltı, which are pleasant suburbs which are more spread out, and both have beaches, a sandy beach in Lara and a pebble beach in Konyaaltı. What would you think of this... come to Turkey for a while, to the place you are thinking of living. Experience it in person. Walk around and get to know people and drink some tea with them. Talk to some other expats there as well. Then you would have a clearer picture in your mind about what you want to do, and be able to act on that, rather than jumping in all at once. If anybody knows of anything different from what I've said here, please reply!
  23. 2 points
    Firstly, I'm an American who has lived in Turkey for around 20 years. Yes, it is true that the Turkish government has rounded up thousands of people. That's because an organization, whose leader is living in Pennsylvania, tried to overthrow the government. And it involved thousands of people. This organization killed a lot of people trying to overthrow a democratically-elected government. So personally, I can't blame the Turkish government too much for their reaction. What would the US government do in the wake of an attempted coup, where the military was also involved, in which military jets were used to attack government buildings in Washington, DC? Probably much the same thing the Turks have done. I just bring that up to put things in a little better perspective. In all of this, yes, there were a few US citizens involved. That's inevitable. It doesn't mean they are persecuting US citizens. They are not. I can say this with a high degree of confidence. Turks don't look at Americans and judge them because of their nationality. They may have big problems with the US government, but they don't judge the individual for it. And what is an "American" anyway? Our population is so diverse in culture, religion, national origin, and personality that it would be silly to put us all in a box and label it. The Turks know this. In a lot of cases, when I tell a Turk that I'm an American, they are rather delighted. They want to talk to me. They often tell me about a relative or friend of theirs who lives in the USA, or they have been to the USA. And the conversation is quite positive. Right now there are some tensions between the US government and the Turkish government. There's always going to be something. It is seldom that two countries have zero issues of contention with each other. I don't hide the fact that I am a US citizen, and I never have. I am surprised at how alike we are as people and as a culture. If they have problems with the USA, it's with the government. Heck, lots of US citizens have a problem with the US government. So personally, I really don't think you need to worry about anti-Americanism. It isn't focused on US citizens. It's about the US government, and I think it will have zero effect on you. If I may ask, what brought about the possibility of your moving to Turkey?
  24. 2 points
    FenerEniste

    Move to Izmir

    Hey also...Pegasus (PGS) Airlines, still fly from Adnan Menderes Airport to to S. Gokcen Airport in Istanbul...I'm sure a few other domestic carries do the same as well.
  25. 2 points
    FenerEniste

    Move to Izmir

    Mavisehir/Karsiyaka (KSK) are close to highway (which gets you to the airport in a reasonable amount of time), that area has an amazing (in my opinion) city layout when compared to Alsancak, plus lots of things to do. A very nice hospital (Medical Park) is within close reach & if you ever have a need to go across the bay, there are many daily ferries & a car ferry as well. Developers have started to build housing areas in the Cigli district which is slightly north of the KSK area & a bit more country. A bit further north is Foca....not far, but not close either. Best bet is really to take a few days and just explore.
  26. 2 points
    Here's a few of mine, compiled over my 20+ years in Izmir: 1. When you still check the taxi meter after midnight to see if it's on "gece" rate (habit from the past). 2. When you no longer automatically assume the older men with young girls in the bar are daddy and daughter out for a beer together. 3. When you need to leave the country every 4-6 months for a break to get your head screwed back on straight / go back to reality. 4. When you seek out the "expat" bars in the resort towns for something "different". 5. When you are no longer surprised when the bank teller asks for ID when you are DEPOSITING money. 6. When you automatically stand right on someone's rear at the ATM to avoid anyone cutting ahead of you. 7. When it no longer seems strange that no one ever pushes their chair in when they get up. 8. When you have forgotten what it's like to drive because you haven't had a car for years. 9. When you notice the LACK of the call to prayer when in some other countries. 10. When it seems normal that Christmas or Easter are just another day.
  27. 2 points
    Hi Raven! I saw your question about IELTS preparation course. I m a Turkish girl. On the other hand ı could give some advice and my experiences in Antalya. I went to Artı (Plus) Language school on Isıklar street many years ago. I advise that a teacher. His name is Fatih Şen. He is the best english teacher in Antalya. You should meet him about your target. I had some experience with the other language courses when ı tried to move to Canada as a physiotherapist. My life changed. I will not go there. Anyways, you could prepare the IELTS exam yourself or with private lessons from this teacher. Hope that this answer is not late :-) Goodluck. (Baron's IELTS Book, Collins IELTS book is good, too)
  28. 2 points
    Ken Grubb

    Move to Izmir

    I have been considering moving to the Izmir peninsula as well. I need to take a trip though, I'd like to see the towns along the northern shore of the peninsula. I went there many years ago, I wonder how much they have changed.
  29. 2 points
    you must wait and see the expiration date on the card. Usually if the first application is for turistic reasons only 1 year is given but who know ...
  30. 2 points
    Goreme1990

    Difference between kargo and ptt

    That's good to know. Good luck and let us know if you get your parcels.
  31. 2 points
    Goreme1990

    Difference between kargo and ptt

    You will have to ask at the PTT. In the past you could send things to any post office, anywhere, poste restante. The item would be held by the post office and you would have to go and pick it up. With this method they don't tell you when it arrives, you just have to guess and ask them. Poste restante is postrestant in Turkish. If you have enough Turkish you can go and ask them Postrestant var mi? and if they say yes ask, Postrestant adres beni yazabilir mi? (Can you write the poste restante address for me). However the most secure way is to give your home or work address.
  32. 2 points
    Goreme1990

    Difference between kargo and ptt

    22 April is not a holiday in Turkey so the PTT and Banks will be open. Please note that 23 April is a holiday. At the PTT you can send items like letters and envelopes by normal mail or boxes and larger things by cargo. How much it costs depends on the weight and dimensions of the item and who fast you want it delivered.
  33. 2 points
    Like Redders said, if you are a foreigner in Turkey and you want to use a phone, wherever it's from, you need to register your yabanci kimlik number with the service provider.
  34. 2 points
    You also have to register if you have a pay as you go SIM card. I successfully added my TC Kimlik number using the Digital Operator link provided by Turkcell.
  35. 2 points
    It appears that the Turkish Telecommunications Authority are having an update of all Internet & mobile phone details for all foreigners. ALL foreigners with a contract with these companies must re-register so the system can be updated. Other providers of home internet/phone & mobile phone will follow suit over the next few days, so keep an eye out for a text message from your Turkish home internet & mobile phone service providers. TURK TELECOM This morning i went to my area Turk Telecom office and re-registered my account for home internet & phone. The documents required are: Passport Residence Permit Customer (Abone) number I wrote my name & signed a new form of registration & that's it all done. Also regarding Turk Telecom & the text many subscribers received. The date of 2nd May to re-register by is just a ''hurry up'' date so you don't drag your heels. As with many Turkish Citizens, if they don't give a date & also threaten restrictions to their service, then many TC's would probably not bother or forget to do this. So as long as it's within May /early June there should be no problems. VODAFONE Just fill in the form from the link given in the mobile phone text message sent. TURKCELL Are the latest to send messages (my wife received hers this morning). Again stating that re registration is required. Passport & Residence Permit needing to be shown by 2nd May 2019. This can be done either by calling into a MAIN Turkcell phone shop or via the "Digital Operator" via the link shown in the text. Now Turkcell actually states in their text that if you do not have a Foreign National Identification Number (99****) your sim will effectively be closed, allowing for just emergency calls. Again, as with Turk Telecom giving this date may be for the same reason stated above, but you definitely have to have a Yabanci Kimlik Number to keep your sim open. It appears that anyone who originally bought a sim solely with their passport & no Residence Permit, may lose their sim & phone number, unless a Yabanci Kimlik Number (99****) can now be shown. The Digital Operator link given in the all texts seems to be causing problems for many folks ,so it's suggested that you simply go into your local service providers shop or office and complete the re registration there. I see by scrolling around some expat pages that some main service provider phone shops are trying to charge for this service. Please be aware THIS SERVICE IS OFFICIALLY FREE. Always use the service providers MAIN shop or area office.
  36. 2 points
    Alijane

    New Biometric Kimlik

    I’ve just come back from the Consulate in London. Easiest thing I’ve ever done there. All they needed was my old Kimlik card & a photo measuring 50 x 60mm. Took my finger prints. It’ll take about 3 weeks so now I await the email to collect the new biometric card. I’ve been told no appointment needed to collect, just go in between 14.00 & 16.00 to collect.Cost was £6. By they way even though I had a mountain of paperwork with me they didn’t require any of it, maybe I was just lucky.
  37. 2 points
    REDDERS

    How to get a Police Certificate!?

    This can be obtained from the e-devlet website if you're registered on it ...... your local courthouse,issued free and within 15 mins....take passport & RP with you.
  38. 2 points
    If I am correct this certificate is "adli sicil kaydı" which is available on E-Devlet. If you don't have E-Devlet, probably Foreigners Branch may provide this.
  39. 2 points
    Then i suggest if your FRP was refused ,when you return,just apply for a normal STRP rather than a Family one,this will save you waiting 6 months to make the same type of RP application [FRP] again. Hopefully ,fingers crossed] if you pay your overstay fine you won't be banned & you could return in a few days asking for the Sartli Giris letter at passport control on entry where you agree to make an RP application within 10 days of the entry date. ;-)
  40. 2 points
    Wael Ayoub

    Lost resident card

    I got my new residence card through mail, I sent the needed documents to prove it was stolen, They agree to do the new one. Documents include 1) photo copy of the residence card.2)Police statement translated to Turkish and approved by the Turkish consulate. All the best guys
  41. 2 points
    Yes you do a great service to us foreigners living in Turkey and deserve all the recognition you can get for that help. Thank you Martin, from the bottom of my heart. x Angela in Side x
  42. 2 points
    Thank you Ken,much appreciated my friend.
  43. 2 points
    REDDERS

    Share in buying a property

    Hi Lisaz,it is possible to have more than one name on a Tapu for a property. If for example three names were on the tapu,they would all own and be responsible for one third of the said property. It doesn't matter if it's a 70sqm apartment or luxury villa. As everyone has to have individual Residence Permits,the joint owners and their spouses can individually apply for their RP's as property owners, [as opposed to Touristic RP's] with the spouses if not named on the Tapu needing to show they are married to one of the owners by showing their apostilled ,translated & noterised wedding certificate.
  44. 2 points
    IbrahimAbi

    Liver!

    Yes, be careful to make sure that he knows you want karaciğer and not akciğer (lungs)
  45. 2 points
    IbrahimAbi

    Liver!

    Most butchers work to a pattern, possibly to have meat in when the town is busy for market day etc. Ask the butcher when he will have some in. Yes, we have bought it from a local butcher before.
  46. 2 points
    Thank you! It is indeed the first application i mean and not an extension. i guess it was a bit ambiguous. Great info and thanks again.
  47. 2 points
    Hi MLG, you can tell he official that you intend to purchase a property,but it won't make any difference to your Touristic application,as you won't have bought it by that time...so just make your application, By the way you stated you'll make an extension application,thats incorrect you need to make a 1st application if presently holding a 90 day visa. As for the length of validity given for Touristic Residence Permit applications, most offices are now using the following... many GOC offices are starting to apply the following….. . Non Property owners, [ie tenants & taahhatname holders]….. Europeans and Canada and USA will get 1 year making a first application, renewals can be up to 2 years. . Non property owners [ie tenants & taahhatname holders]…from, Middle East and Asian countries will get 6 months residence for first applications and renewals will be a maximum of 1 year. Apologies for the large text,i copied & pasted the above from my files website.. As Ken said above,when you do move you must inform the GOC & Nufus office within 20 working days.. Here's the form you need for the GOC office to show regarding a new address,please download,print off then fill in to take with you. loss.name change.p.port form.xlsx
  48. 2 points
    Eglegal

    Child Maintenance & Changes

    Hi, There might be a little delay in the beginning since the court will send the official letters to him. But then it is fine, written notification would no longer be necessary during judgment. Regards,
  49. 2 points
    Eglegal

    Child Maintenance & Changes

    Hi Katyirir, According to your reference above, I assume that he has been making the payment not on the ground of a court ruling but only a verbal agreement between two of you. For this reason, you unfortunately cannot enforce the law for your interest if he stops or reduces the amount of financial support. However, you still have a right to claim child support before the family court. As we are talking about "child support", it is not a consideration point for judge whether you have a partner or not. Your children are entitled that just because of they are the children of your ex husband. Wish you and your family the best, Regards,
  50. 2 points
    What REDDERS said is correct, what I said was incorrect. I have crossed out my previous comment concerning this (Thank you, REDDERS!). So then, if I am understanding this correctly, you will have to leave the country for 90 days (paying a fine as you are leaving) because you are over the limit for the number of days in Turkey. After 90 days, you can re-enter with a new visa. Then you can reapply immediately for a short-term touristic residence permit (and not have to wait for 180 days), because a short-term residence permit is a different type of residence permit. Then later, when your short-term residence permit is within 60 days of expiring (assuming that you get one for one year), you can apply again for a family residence permit.
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