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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/02/19 in all areas

  1. That sounds like me. I think I just have to study harder than most people. The private courses have helped a lot, I never get left behind and can ask the teacher to stop and clarify things, and I often give him a list of questions we go over the first part of the class. I think for people like me private courses are a must... with the right teacher. And wow, it does take a lot of determination. My Turkish friends often say "you need to go out and find Turkish people to speak with." But I don't think even that will help much, the Turks are very polite and tend not to correct mistakes! My teacher definitely does, then shows me the correct way of saying what I want to say. I am hoping that after the next course (the final one), watching Turkish TV and reading Turkish will be easier, and a lot less like work, not to mention the conversation.
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  2. I could not just read and leave without thanking you Fil. I also, thank you WizWooz for starting this thread, and you spoke of my concerns as well. Thank you both.
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  3. You're an absolute angel Fil , thankyou so much
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  4. Children start year one at 6-6. 1/2. Children aged five get registered in school but usually get sent to the anasinif (kindergarten class). Parents can choose a private kindergarten if they want. Statistics show that children who start when they are older tend to be more successful so it is better to delay starting. It would give you more time to get the reading started. Classes are big in state schools. Can be up to fifty. Qualifications well it is not true to say they are useless but it is not certain they are full equivalents. Individual cases vary. A university degree is a degree. But it is likely to be desirable career wise to do further study. I know of people who have taught in UK with Turkish certification, but a pgce on top would be better. If you are on good terms with the teacher and head they won't be fussy about attendance at all. It is important to find out as much as possible about the class teachers practices you need to ask around. Good teachers usually have the biggest classes. Think about all the nice kind decent people you know in Turkey. They have all been through the Turkish education system. The good doctors, bank staff, technicians etc. And you should be confident that you know or can learn enough to manage situations to your children's benefit.
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  5. Private schools will set you back 10000TL to 35000TL a year for your older daughter. The younger one is kindergarten age, that will be 450TL per month up to 1000TL per month. Whether you choose state or private you will need to provide a lot of back-up and additional support. Speaking personally I do not think the private schools provide anything like value for money. The teachers are the same as in state schools. The curriculum is the same. The private schools' main selling point is teaching English, which presumably yours already have, so they will be wasting their time for 12 lessons a week. All you get for the extra money is cleaner toilets and facilities and smaller classes. We preferred to spend spare cash on educational support for the children, not on school fees. I feel that foreign parents are better off considering state school, home schooling or a combination of state and home schooling. At least state school will provide good opportunities for learning Turkish and meeting people. If your children have a Turkish parent then home schooling is probably not an option. If your stay is long-term and your children might want to attend university and work in Turkey, then state school is probably preferable. If your stay is short-term and the children will need to rejoin another education system later on, then home schooling is probably the best option. Our children went all through state school from start to finish, one is now at university in Ankara and the other starts university next year. It was quite tough for them (and their parents) at times, but they have gained excellent skills in writing and speaking Turkish, which couldn't really have been done without going through Turkish education. I also suspect their maths is better in Turkey than it would have been in UK, although there is no way of knowing for sure. And I think the gender stereotyping concerning subjects is worse in UK than in Turkey. Although not by that much, and both have ended up choosing languages at university (like their father), but at least they were not heavily channeled in that direction by the schools from age 14. If children have good Turkish language skills to start off with, then the shool experiences are less difficult. But it is never easy anywhere to be different, particularly for children. It also seems to be somewhat tougher for boys than for girls. You have a difficult decision, and it will never be easy, but try to focus on the many positive aspects, the unique experiences, the language skills, the insights into different types of people. It is important for parents to be very supportive, encouraging and flexible. Establish good channels of communication and keep them open no matter what, keep calm, don't get angry whatever happens. Help and encourage with homework, but don't let it get you or your child down. many teachers set too much homework, most of it pointless and intended to keep the children off the streets. Good luck.
    1 point
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