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Earthquake

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Any member did feel the earthquake this morning at 08.05 in Alanya?This one was more stronger then the last one (3.4 Richter) in June this year.Everything was moving, coffee over the table.1 of our guests was coming out of his bed, thinking we were shaking his bed :rolleyes:

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..if you go to www.sondepremler.com you can find out were the eartquakes in turkey are ..also the magnitude.felt a small one here in kusadasi on saturday :D

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..if you go to www.sondepremler.com you can find out were the eartquakes in turkey are ..also the magnitude.felt a small one here in kusadasi on saturday :D

Thanks, Steve, I tried, but I see something else? 'araba, elektronik, internet, lifestyle,bilgisayar, randevu' :PGlad you are okay ;)

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Didn't feel a thing. I was walking to work at that time, no sign at ground level. Noone in the house (6th floor) felt it either. Maybe the geology in this part of town stops it.

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..if you go to www.sondepremler.com you can find out were the eartquakes in turkey are ..also the magnitude.felt a small one here in kusadasi on saturday :D

The correct URL is www.SonDepremler.info

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      Some areas in Turkey lie on or near fault lines, and even in the coastal resort cities it is not unusual to feel a tremor from time to time. In August 1999, an earthquake in Izmit, some 50 miles south of Istanbul, suffered a 7.4 magnitude earthquake which resulted in 17,000 deaths. The same earthquake in Japan would have caused far less casualties. Many of the deaths in Izmir were caused by shoddy construction, including the substitution of beach sand for industrial-quality sand in concrete (beach sand is smooth and unsuitable for construction), as well as the use of cheap, un-knurled reinforcement bar which pulls out of concrete easily when under stress.
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