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Wish I Never Started This .....!


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#1 alibertiz

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 10:27 PM

Has anyone got any advice for me.I bought a plot of land on the same hill that the company who Ricky Hatton bought from has their land. It was one of very few plots of land that was bought up on this hillside before they come on the scene.The property is now built (very well by all accounts) - it is two 2 bedroom apartments on their own land with their own large swimming pool. As the recession hit last year, the building works slowed down in Turkey and I have been advised by my builder that there is no access to water or electricity as our side of the hill has not been developed by the developers as yet and therefore they have not applied for electricity cables and transformers etc on that side of the hill. He has given us a quote for obtaining the same ourselves. He has paid out for artesian well (which will be shared with another property), its pump station and the 300m water connection pipe. He has also paid for the electrical engineers project plans, and permission of connection of power but cannot afford to pay out for the rest of the cabling and transformer etc. I am now in a situation where "I think" I wait until the hillside is developed or I pay for the rest of the works to be done myself. It is a lovely property and we have been advised by two builder friends that it has been built well but we are so frustrated about having to plough more money into this property. The roads are yet to be developed as well so it is very much dirt track. How can someone build a property on some land and not ensure that there will be electricity and water - it is effectively uninhabitable without the same. Any ideas anyone?Trying to get information of someone to contact, i.e. the council or planning department to see when the developers are thinking of asking for the electricity and water mains to be run up and connected is like trying to draw blood from a stone. Do I leave this property sitting waiting as an investment and get someone to manage it to ensure that it is not broken into or do I pay out to have the works done which in this climate is a very risky thing to do with your savings as noone knows what is round the corner with their jobs.Help please .......!

#2 Meral

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 10:58 PM

Hi Alibertiz, you are certainly in a dilemma here ! I agree builders ought not build where utilities are not ensured, but of course this is Turkey (no disrespect intended) ! Effectively uninhabitable without ? Well, not in the olden days ! :) ! However,, these days such luxuries are necessities, and so more to the point is you probably wouldn't be able to get a habitation certificate without them (surely not ?). Your artesian well also requires power to operate it, so you are stuck ! :doh[1]: To make good use of the property (now that it's beautifully built), and failing any hints from authorities about future development, it would make sense to bite the bullet & go ahead with paying for it yourself. You might recoup some of this expense by charging future neighbours for tapping into your privately-owned resource. But of course you don't want to leave yourself short in the meantime, need to keep something for a rainy day !But these are things to think of, and you will have to make the final decision............. Good Luck ! :rolleyes:
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#3 brianmwatts

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 11:10 PM

All of the sites the other side of the lake: Flamingo Country Club, Royal Heights, Turquoise and Lakeside Garden all have no mains water, therefore this has to be shipped in by tankers, that is over 1500 properties where the developer has failed in the basic essential of water, luckily there is electricity when there are no power cuts! These are not the only sites without services either, it appears that there are no building regulations with regards to provision for services in Turkey, or if they are they are brushed under the carpet.Before any further investmant, you need to ask yourself the bhe big question of why did you purchase i.e. Lifestyle (you'll move there or keep as your private holiday home), investment (quick sale) or rental return/invetament. If the former I would say buy a generator that would be adequate for the property to provide the electricity, if the latter two, you carefully need to weight up the current climate for resales and also rental returns in Turkey before making a decision. And you should also remember that you will be assisting the services to the area if you pay for them, but will not get a return, from the developers, for your generous contribution, when the rest of the area is developed.Having said that there are areas where there are clearly electricty services installed for developments that will happen in the future, one good example is on the Milas -S

#4 Karyn

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 11:13 PM

It's pretty difficult to advise on situations like this because I can't tell from your post exactly what happened when you bought the land and what you were actually buying into.I'm guessing but it sounds like you bought an individual plot amongst a large number of other plots and so far your plot is the only one that has been developed although the other plots have been bought.Turkey sort of plans ahead for future population growth and allocates areas for residential development and puts them on the imari plani with room allocated for roads and services and then waits for the areas to be developed by individuals and companies. It is normally up to the buyer of the individual plot to seek advice on utilities and road access as part of their decision to buy process. It is usually the first thing you look at when considering a plot - how much to bring in utilities? how easy is access? at what stage during building can I get power and water? - because these have an impact not just on the decision to buy but on the cost of building.If the other plots around you remain undeveloped and basically land banked by a developer then your options are quite limited. Personally I would try speaking to the developer who owns the other plots and see if he would contribute to the cost of bringing in the power as this would increase the value of the plots he holds and the speed with which he can build should he decide to break ground. Alternatively you could consider a solar off grid system, this gives your property a certain unique selling point and it may be cost effective compared to running in power and buying Aydem a nice new transformer, though it would require some adjustment to the electrical project.A property without power cannot be signed off as completed and a habitiation certificate granted and so you have a limited time to get this done within the terms of the planning permission. Also, on a purely practical basis you can't be sure that the house actually is well built if the electrics haven't been checked! Sorry I can't suggest anything more useful, your builder sounds like a decent guy if he has already provided you with well water, and if there is a way to get this done cheaper he will probably have the contacts to make it happen.Karyn

My Website and Blog - Being Koy about life in Kirazli Village near Kusadasi


#5 alibertiz

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 06:23 PM

Thanks all for your comments. You are right that we bought a plot of land on a hillside and in fact the developers (when they bought the hillside) went to the trouble of finding out if we had bought the land legally as we have prime location. There are only a handful of plots that got sold prior to them buying the hillside. I never thought of solar power to be honest but this might be an easier way. Yes our builder has advised us that we would have to bring in the transformer and then people would have to pay us to connect to us. He has already had the electrical engineers project plans, and permission of connection of power completed but cannot afford to obtain the transformer and cabling etc. I think the best way forward would to be to find out how much the rest will cost or to find out what the cost of solar power would be. To be honest when we bought the plot and signed the contract we were maybe a bit "green" to the way things are done in Turkey and over the past 3 or 4 years we have established that it is nothing like the UK! We just assumed that once we had signed the contract and once the Council had given permission to build that there would be electricity and water available to us. Our solicitors are a nightmare. They have had our money for 1 year to apply for military clearance but have only just confirmed (via our builder) that this has come through. I have made investigations about making a formal complaint about them once this is all finished but to be honest with you I have been advised that all solicitors in small areas know each other and nothing will come of the complaint. Can anyone shed any light on - now our military clearance has come through, what now happens. If we agree that the snagging has been done to our expectations, do the Deeds now go into our name and then the dealings with the solicitors are finished. Can we apply for our own habitation certificate once we are ready to turn it from a stone building into our holiday home. Does anyone have any experience of what would be the chances of selling the property at this point in time?I know I have a lot of questions but it is very difficult not knowing how things go out there.Thanks again.

#6 Karyn

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 05:03 PM

HiActually the Turkish building system is very similar to the British system just in the UK you aren't really aware of the steps that you go through because your solicitor just does most of it and very few people actually know about it because they don't build their own houses. It's only the words that are really different. If you have built a house from bare land in the UK you would seem the similarities.Here you buy bare land, building land, called arsa - essentially this is a piece of land that can be used for residential development. At that point the deeds can go into your name, and you own a building plot. You then seek planning permission, here this is slightly more complex than the UK because of the geological issues but other than that it is straightforward. At this point your plot is a building plot with detailed planning permission.You build your house, or you have a builder build your house, in accordance with the plans and in accordance with building regs (yes we do have them!). When the house is completed it is registered on the land and your plot becomes land with house. As part of the final registration process you have to obtain the habitation certificate, this shows that the house was built to code, matches the plans, is in the correct place on the plot and the men who built it were legally employed and insured workers.When the house is registered on the land your deed is changed from arsa to ev or meskin, either is fine, and the job is done. You have a legally registered house on your land.Utilities are a different thing and, as in the UK, their control falls under the water board and the electricity board and they are not compelled to provide them to you if you are a long way from the main supply, you have to contribute. And as the first one to build on the hill you are naturally going to bear a higher cost than those who come after you. Incidently, normally if you buy a transformer, and a single transformer won't be enough to manage the supply of a whole hillsides worth of houses unless it is the size of a small truck, that transformer normally becomes the property of the power company and whilst you have provided it, it isn't yours, per se.So essentially, the deeds could have been transferred into your name and should have been at the earliest opportunity, you didn't need to wait until the house was complete, so get the deeds transferred into your name asap. Also, your builder is the best person to apply for the habitation certificate for you, he built it, he needs to prove that his staff were legally employed during the course of the build and he is best placed to obtain it for you.Once you have the hab cert ensure your builder takes these to the authorities and has the house "mapped" onto the land and your deed classification changed to from land to house on land. Without these you cannot get domestic rate power anyway and you will get problems in the future.None of these things are in themselves expensive, providing all has been done correctly, but they are fiddly and they are an essential part of building a house and the need for them should be accounted for in time and the budget when you plan a build. Hope this makes sense.Karyn

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#7 alibertiz

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 04:06 PM

Thanks - you have been a big help. I think personally that our builder is doing what is best for us (he used to live in the UK) and I sincerely believe that he thought that the land would have been developed by now and we would not have the need to apply for utilities from down the bottom of the hill on the roadside. I think at this point I will need to have a meeting with the other people involved in this property and see what the best course of action would be for us. Obviously we would like to see it up and running but if this has to be put on hold for a while then c'est la vie. There is a property just along from ours (never anyone there) but their pool is filled with water and I am assuming they have utilities - not sure what they have done though as whenever my husband has been to the property, their property is empty. Thanks for all the information though - it helps a great deal. Alibertiz